Journal archives for June 2018

June 07, 2018

Section Nummulariopsis

There are five taxa of sect. Nummulariopsis in the United States. Out of these, three are restricted to Florida.

Euphorbia inundata var. inundata
Differs from var. garrettii by its geography and broader leaves. iNaturalist observations.

Photo credit: Lillie

Euphorbia inundata var. garrettii
Differs from var. inundata by its geography and narrower leaves. Restricted to the west-central part of the Florida peninsula. Photos and additional information can be found at Atlas of Florida Plants.

Photo credit: Edwin Bridges

Euphorbia floridana
Leaves narrow like E. inundata. Differs from E. inundata by its errose gland edges, shorter pedicels, and seed characteristics. iNaturalist observations.

Photo credit: Andy Newman (left), Alvin Diamond (right).

Euphorbia rosescens
With E. telephioides, characterized by broad leaves less than 6 times their width. It differs from E. telephioides by its larger cyathia and geography. According to FNA, "...a narrow-endemic, gap-specialist known only from the southern portion of the Lake Wales Ridge in Highlands County." Photos and additional information can be found at Atlas of Florida Plants. Also see a picture of the the Holotype, which have leaves that strongly resemble E. inundata.

Photo credit: Edwin Bridges

Euphorbia telephioides
With E. rosescens, characterized by broad leaves less than 6 times their width. It differs from E. rosescens by its smaller cyathia and geography. According to FNA, "...known only from Bay, Franklin, and Gulf counties in the Apalachicola region of the east-central Florida panhandle." Photos and additional information can be found at Atlas of Florida Plants.

Photo credit: Edwin Bridges (Observation 1; observation 2)

Sources:
Euphorbia (Euphorbiaceae) Section Tithymalus Subsection Inundatae in the Southeastern United States
Flora of North America
Atlas of Florida Plants

Posted on June 07, 2018 22:16 by nathantaylor nathantaylor | 8 comments | Leave a comment

June 29, 2018

Tomato Hornworm color variation based on host

I recently got an infestation of Tomato Hornworms (Manduca sexta) on my tomato plant and turned it into an excuse to do a casual experiment. I decided to raise them on several different hosts to see if there was any color variation as I remembered seeing a silvery Manduca quinquemaculata on Silverleaf Nightshade. Anyway, the associated observations tell the story.

They were raised on the following plant species:
Raised on Proboscidea louisianica (Devil's Claw).

Initially collected as pests on my tomato plant. Initial observation here.
Caterpillars from the same batch raised on multiple different plants as follows (click on name to see observation):
Solanum lycopersicum (Tomato)
Solanum tuberosum (Potato)
Solanum elaeagnifolium (Silver-leaf Nightshade):
28 Jun 2018 (same individual or group of individuals)
4 Jul 2018 (same individual or group of individuals)
Solanum rostratum (Buffalo Bur)
Proboscidea louisianica (Devil's Claw):
28 Jun 2018 (same individual or group of individuals)
4 Jul 2018 (same individual or group of individuals)

When they started out, they looked like this: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/13592914. Some were so young that they were yellow instead of green.

I decided to let them go today as the tomato creates a lot of humidity in a little vial which caused problems. Also, my potato plants can't keep up with the caterpillar's needs. Despite this, I still might be able to check on the caterpillars started on native plants as I released them on the same plants they were raised on.

Posted on June 29, 2018 03:52 by nathantaylor nathantaylor | 5 observations | 1 comments | Leave a comment