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Ireland - iNaturalist World Tour

We're in Ireland to celebrate the big 60 on the iNaturalist World Tour! The top observer is @alflinn329 who has made multiple trips all around Ireland. The second top observer, @formicacid, has activity centered around Carlow. Just to the northwest @koos1 has many observations in the Kilamuck Bog. @deirdrecape is based at the very southwestern tip of Ireland including quite a few from Dursey Island. @rmcmind, currently based in France, is one of the top observers in Ireland. @ahospers, @tiwane, @qgroom, @deboas, & @greglasley are other visitors high up in the observations leaderboard. @shawnodonnell, a Palaeoecologist at Queen's University in Belfast, has many observations in Northern Ireland and elsewhere around the world from around the world but also has quite a few observations from Ireland, particularly County Claire. The same can be said for @bernardpicton, a curator at the National Museum of Northern Ireland in Cultra who focuses on marine invertebrates. Quite a few top observers such as @munstermad are clustered around the capital of Dublin. Just to the north, @adventuresinwoowoo is based near Dundalk. @danielor is a marine biologist at the Marine Institute in Oranmore. While @emilytoner not among the top 50 observers, her research as a National Geographic Explorer is on the cultural and biological significance of Irish peat bogs.


Observations ramped up in the summer of 2018 to around 1,000 observations per month. This summer of 2019 this has since doubled to around 2,000 observations per month.


The top identifier is @alanhorstmann, who in addition to being an expert in South African Succulents and a huge presence on iNaturalist in southern africa, spends several months a year in County Cork, Ireland. Most of the top identifiers are based elsewhere in Europe, such as @ldacosta (leading in birds), @tiggrx (leading in plants), and @amzamz (leading in insects). I should note that there are more mollusk observations than usual in Ireland, probably since Ireland is an Island with lots of nearby coastline. @pierrenoel, a marine biologist from France, is the top mollusk identifier. Many thanks to other top identifiers such as @alexis_orion, @jhbratton and (top observer) @shawnodonnell.


What can we do to get more people in Ireland using iNaturalist? Please share your thoughts below or on this forum thread

@alflinn329, @formicacid, @deirdrecape, @rmcminds, @koos1, @alanhorstmann, @ldacosta, @tiggrx, @alexis_orion, @jhbratton

We’ll be back tomorrow in Croatia!

Posted on August 22, 2019 18:32 by loarie loarie | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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YWTMP needs your moose and caribou samples!

Calling all moose and caribou hunters - Yukon Winter Tick Monitoring Project needs your help!

In addition to keeping us up to date with your photos here on iNaturalist, this season, we are asking hunters to bring us a smaller sample of hide so we can carry out a winter tick check. Just a 20cm x 40cm sample, taken from the neck and shoulder region of the animal's right side is needed for us to look for winter ticks.

Pick up your free hide sample kit at Environment Yukon (10 Burns Rd, Whitehorse) which contains instructions and a hide sample template to cut around (or download from our Hide Submissions photos on Facebook 😊). If you want to keep a hide whole, then we can still carry out a winter tick check and return it to you completely undamaged.

Note it's unlikely you'll be able to see winter tick larvae on your kill, as they are super tiny at this time of year (the size of a grain of sand, or a poppyseed)! But we have ways of looking for them in the lab - every sample helps.

And to say thank-you for helping with this research, for every moose or caribou hide or sample submitted you will receive your choice of a top quality thermos or 2 deluxe game bags.

Posted on August 22, 2019 16:58 by emilychenery emilychenery | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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We have hit 100 sample packages received!

You all have done it!! We have received our 100th package of leaves. Thank you to all you wonderful citizen scientists and Ginkgo lovers that have engaged so generously with our project.
Next up - our 200th sample! Many of the packages we are receiving have multiple samples in them, so we are already well on our way!

Posted on August 22, 2019 14:04 by fossilatmospheres fossilatmospheres | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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We have hit 100 sample packages received!

You all have done it!! We have received our 100th package of leaves. Thank you to all you wonderful citizen scientists and Ginkgo lovers that have engaged so generously with our project.

Next up - our 200th sample! Many of the packages we are receiving have multiple samples in them, so we are well on our way!

Posted on August 22, 2019 13:37 by fossilatmospheres fossilatmospheres | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Visit to Broadmoor Wildlife Sanctuary: August 18, 2019

Went for a walk through this wonder Mass Audubon site over boardwalks and through the woods. There were more turtles than could be counted, many sunning themselves in neat lines along branches sticking out of the water. In addition to these observations we saw geese as well as a hawk. It was shady and very humid. There were also quite a lot of fungi along the trail, but I was on parent duty and wasn't able to make as many observations as I would have like to. This is a great place for woods walks with little ones, as well as a great place to see both aquatic and forest critters in close proximity.

Posted on August 22, 2019 13:31 by heatherolins heatherolins | 5 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Есть 500 видов

В рамках неформального конкурса Большой год на iNaturalist сфотографировано 500 видов птиц России. Цифру в 200 видов прошли 4 участника, больше 100 видов набрали 24.
Ранг Пользователь Вид
1 @vladimirarkhipov 270
2 @g_kolotin 248
3 @aquacielo 225
4 @dmitrydubikovskiy 201
5 @igor-dvurekov 166
6 @alexeiebel 166
7 @alinaboksorn 165
8 @tomegatherion 161
9 @konstantinsamodurov 141
10 @nevski 140
11 @melodi_96 131
12 @anatolykotlov 129
13 @veravolobyeva 126
14 @mikhail_87_ 120
15 @merlu 119
16 @olegglushenkov 118
17 @michail_anurev03 116
18 @alekseyfaraway 112
19 @mikhaillethean 109
20 @ruseva 106
21 @dinanesterkova 105
22 @sofya_priezzhih 103
23 @marnika 102
24 @dorithur 101

Posted on August 22, 2019 13:03 by birdchuvashia birdchuvashia | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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That's a Wrap! Week #7 Nature Walk

Our TD Summer Reading Club has wrapped for 2019! Thank you to all the families who joined our program - we had great fun telling stories, making crafts and watching nature on our walks around town. On our final nature walk August 16th, we saw some white asters, a frog, a tiny Eastern Tailed-Blue butterfly (who was too camera shy for a picture) and a Meadowhawk dragonfly.

Posted on August 22, 2019 12:41 by ursus_arctos ursus_arctos | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/extra_fields_nz

https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/extra_fields_nz

For all fields in iNaturalist NZ — Mātaki Taiao (and the global iNaturalist network), see https://inaturalist.nz/observation_fields/. Any of these fields can also be added to Projects as required or recommended fields for people to fill in. This is a great way to add value to the observations in a project.

If you cannot find the field you need, you can create it. Any field you create will be available to everyone across iNaturalist NZ — Mātaki Taiao and the whole iNaturalist Network. If you do create a new field, please take the time first to ensure that a field doesn't already exist with the same function. You can search all of the existing fields at https://inaturalist.nz/observation_fields/.

Recommended fields

Observation fields work best when everyone uses the same one field for a particular purpose. With that in mind, we list here our favourite fields that are commonly used throughout iNaturalist NZ.

General monitoring fields

For how long did you search? What did you look for? How many did you find?

Activity duration (minutes) (How long did you spend observing? Values are in hours and minutes.)
Count
Dead or alive
Is it wild?
Bands observed (For recording band combinations of banded individuals, like bird leg bands.)
Casual or planned observation (Was this observation an incidental, "casual" observation or the result of a planned search or survey for this species?)
Area searched (m2)
Searched for all birds (This observation was part of a survey for all birds.)
Searched for all dragonflies and damselflies (This observation was part of a survey for all dragonflies and damselflies.)
Searched for all butterflies (This observation was part of a survey for all butterflies.)
Searched for all plants (This observation was part of a survey for all plants, with or without mosses and liverworts.)
Searched for all (Specify the taxonomic group that you searched for in your survey.)
Taxon sought but not found (Specify the taxonomic group that you searched for in your survey, when you found none of them at all. Add this to an observation with no species ID.)
Identification uncertain
(For observations where you didn't get a photo/recording and you're pretty sure of your ID but not 100% certain.)
Sampling methods

Method of surveying for invertebrates
Five minute bird count method
Botany sampling method
Mammal tracking method
Monitoring_Plot/Site Non-Species Data (Add this to the Key observation in a series of observations that contains all of your Plot/Site data — this observation gets all of the non-biological and/or non-species-specific site data (e.g., weather data, soil type, slope, bare ground, moss cover, etc.))
People fields

Your name will automatically be added to your observation. However, sometimes you may also want to add names of other observers.

Original observer If you're not the person who originally made this observation, you can add their name in this field.
Photographer If you didn't take the photo, you can add the name of the photographer in this field.
Additional observers You can list the names of the people with you when you made the observation.
Number of observers If the number of observers is an important measure of collection effort for your project, you can include it with this field.
Substrate

Substrate refers to the kind of thing a species is growing on.

Lichen substrate
Substrate of fungus
Substrate_detail2 (drop down list of primarily epiphyte substrates)
Substrate type (dropdown list of bare ground textures)
Topography

Elevation (m) (You can usually get this later from maps but if you have more accurate on site information you can add it.)
Weather and Noise

The weather conditions can influence what species you find. The following are the standard weather fields used in NZ 5-minute bird counts.

Simple temperature (from " freezing (less than 0 degrees C)" to "hot (greater than 22 degrees C)")
Simple wind (from " Leaves still or move without noise (Beaufort 0 and 1)" to "Branches or trees sway (Beaufort 5, 6 and 7) ")
Direct sunshine (minutes) (make sure that you also use Activity duration (minutes), so that the proportion of time with direct sun can be calculated)
Preciptiation type (from "None" to "Snow")
Precipitation intensity (from "None" to "Heavy")
Noise (from "Not important" to "Loud")
Lifestage/Behaviour

Insect life stage
Bird life stage
Plant life stage
Fungi life stage
Simple life stage: adult or juvenile
Sex
Animal sign and song (useful if you just found tracks, or scat, or an empty nest, etc.)
Oviposition (was a female laying eggs?)
Plant phenology

Plant flower buds
Plant flowering
Plant immature fruit/seeds
Plant mature fruit/seeds
Plant seeds dispersed
Plant phenology: most common flowering/fruiting reproductive stage
Interactions

Nature is filled with species interacting with other species. These interactions are often poorly documented (what eats what, what pollinates what, etc.) so it's really helpful to add these fields to observations of species interacting. It's best to add each appropriate interaction to an observation using the relevant field starting with "Interaction->".

You can also add the link to another observation using the "associated observation" field.

Interaction->Flower visited by
Interaction->Visited flower of
Interaction->Fruit eaten by
Interaction->Ate fruit of
Interaction->Dispersed seed of
Interaction->Seed dispersed by
Interaction->Ate seed of
Interaction->Seed eaten by
Interaction->Preyed upon by
Interaction->Preyed on
Interaction->Herbivory by
Interaction->Herbivore of
type of herbivory
Interaction->Parasite of
Interaction->Parasitoid of
Interaction->Hemiparasite of
Interaction->Parasitised by
Interaction->Infected by
Interaction->Pathogen of
Interaction->Nested in
Interaction->Used as nest by
Interaction->Decomposer of
Interaction->Decomposed by
Interaction->Carcass scavenged by
Interaction->Scavenged carcass of
Interaction->Competition with
Interaction->Chasing
Interaction->Chased by
Mobbing
Mobbed by
Interaction->Egg(s) laid on/in
Interaction->Damaged
Interaction->Damaged by
Host
Is Host For
Perching on
Five minute bird count fields

Five minute bird count method
Count
Minimum number of individuals SEEN (If you're having trouble counting the exact number of individuals, it can be easier to provide a minimum and maximum for the number of individuals of a species that you see.)
Maximum number of individuals SEEN
Minimum number of individuals HEARD ONLY
Maximum number of individuals HEARD ONLY
Bird using habitat (Was the bird you saw using the local habitat or just flying by?)
Simple temperature (Which of the following best describes the temperature at your site?)
Simple wind (Which of the following best matches the wind conditions at your site?)
Noise (Noise can make it harder to detect some species (e.g. hear bird calls).)
Direct sunshine in 5 minutes (To the nearest minute, how much of your five minutes of sampling was the sun not blocked by cloud?)
Precipitation type
Precipitation intensity
Or, for including five minute counts inside longer bird counts:

Minimum number of individuals seen in first five minutes (Counts for just the first five minutes of your duration)
Maximum number of individuals seen in first five minutes (Counts for just the first five minutes of your duration. If one bird is seen and goes away and another of the same species is later seen, then the maximum is 2 and the minimum is 1.)
Minimum number of individuals HEARD ONLY in the first five minutes (Counts for just the first five minutes of your duration)
Maximum number of individuals HEARD ONLY in the first five minutes (Counts for just the first five minutes of your duration)
Minimum number of individuals seen after the first five minutes (Counts from the first five minutes to the end of the duration of your count)
Maximum number of individuals seen after the first five minutes (Counts from the first five minutes to the end of the duration of your count. If one bird is seen and goes away and another of the same species is later seen, then the maximum is 2 and the minimum is 1.)
Minimum number of individuals HEARD ONLY after the first five minutes (Counts from after the first five minutes to the end of your count duration)
Maximum number of individuals HEARD ONLY after the first five minutes (Counts for just the first five minutes of your duration)
Seen after the first five minutes (For simpler recording after the first five minutes: did you see this species only after the first five minutes of recording? Yes/No)
HEARD ONLY after the first five minutes (For simpler recording after the first five minutes: did you HEAR but not see this species only after the first five minutes of recording? Yes/No)
Pest mammal trapping

Trap Types The NZ standard trap types for mammalian pest control trap monitoring.
Other Trap Type This is the specified other trap type in the NZ standard trap types for mammalian pest control trap monitoring.
Trap Bait Type The NZ standard trap bait types for mammalian pest control pest trap monitoring.
Other trap bait type This is the specified other trap bait type in the NZ standard trap bait types for mammalian pest control trap monitoring.
Trap status The NZ standard trap status for mammalian pest control pest trap monitoring.
Bait Station target species The NZ standard bait station target species for mammalian pest control bait station monitoring.
Other bait station target species This is the specified other bait station target species in the NZ standard trap bait types for mammalian pest control trap monitoring.
Bait formulation The NZ standard bait formulation for mammalian pest control bait station monitoring.
Other bait formulation This is the specified other bait formulation in the NZ standard trap bait types for mammalian pest control trap monitoring.
Bait Station Type The NZ standard bait station type for mammalian pest control bait station monitoring.
Other Bait Station Type This is the specified other bait station type in the NZ standard trap bait types for mammalian pest control trap monitoring.
Bait active ingredient The NZ standard bait active ingredients for mammalian pest control bait station monitoring.
Other bait active ingredient This is the specified other bait active ingredient in the NZ standard trap bait types for mammalian pest control trap monitoring.
Taxonomy fields

These fields are for people good with names. Many NZ species don't have scientific names yet. Taxonomists say that species without formal names and scientific descriptions are "undescribed". Some are easily recognised and expected to be real species when the taxonomic work is done. These are given "tag names" in the mean time. To make observations of probable species

https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/extra_fields_nz

= = = = = =
https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/add-an-observation-nz
Don't be surprised if other users also add your observation to Projects on iNaturalist NZ — Mātaki Taiao, or add extra fields to your observation that can make it more useful to researchers. There are lots of Projects in iNaturalist NZ dedicated to gathering together particular kinds of observations. Extra fields are things like life stage, associated species, and reproductive state (like whether a plant is flowering). You can also add extra field information to your observations. See here for details.

We've only covered the essentials of adding an observation via the webpage. There are other features there too for power users. Import lets you upload lots of observations at once from your photo library on Facebook or Flickr, or you can bulk upload a whole spreadsheet. From photos lets you upload lots of photos at once from your hard-drive and iNaturalist NZ will look inside the file info of each photo for the date, time, location (from a camera GPS) and any recognisable species names added to the photo metadata.
https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/add-an-observation-nz
= = = = = =

Posted on August 22, 2019 11:47 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Identification help for the similar Hippotion caterpillars

I have created a journal post in the Sphingidae project to help with identification of the very similar Hippotion celerio and H. eson caterpillars.

See https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/sphingidae-hawkmoths-of-southern-africa/journal/26881

Thank you very much to @magrietb for all her help :-)

Posted on August 22, 2019 11:43 by karoopixie karoopixie | 1 comments | Leave a comment
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Identification help for the similar Hippotion caterpillars


Image of brown & green H. celerio kind courtesy @ydnewp2

Hippotion celerio and H. eson caterpillars are hard to tell apart, especially in the younger instars.

Both species have green and brown forms. As far as we can tell, H. eson always turns brown in final instar, whereas H. celerio can remain green.

These notes are based on our experience so far, and we welcome any further tips and amendments. The pillars are very variable, so these notes are just a guide.

BROWN FORMS



Images kind courtesy of @magdastlucia and @ernestporter



Diagnostic feature:
H. eson always has the white patch, H. celerio never does.



GREEN FORMS



Images kind courtesy of @magrietb



Diagnostic feature:
They're all a bit iffy, but @magrietb says the ring around the big 'eye' is the best character, especially in later instars.


Thank you very much to Magriet for all the notes, especially about the green forms, from her experience of rearing the little munchkins :-)

Posted on August 22, 2019 11:38 by karoopixie karoopixie | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Объединяйте фотографии в "Наблюдения"!!!

Объединяйте фотографии в "Наблюдения"!!!

Напоминаю, что проект "Флора России | Flora of Russia" руководствуется принципами строго научной документации флористического разнообразия страны с помощью привязанных к карте фотоснимков.

Настоятельно напоминаю о необходимости объединения во время загрузки фотографий одного вида из одного места, снятых подряд, в одно "Наблюдение".

О других регулярных ошибках можно прочитать тут: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/flora-of-russia/journal/21168-

Очень прошу коллег-экспертов, которые занимаются просмотром и подтверждением определений загружаемых фотографий, писать авторам фотографий (в комментарии к новым наблюдениям или в виде личных сообщений) о выявленных недостатках в их данных:
- не поставленной галочке при загрузке культурных растений;
- не объединенных в одно "Наблюдение" (при загрузке) фотографий одного вида из одной точки, снятых в один день;
- напротив, объединенных в одно наблюдение растений, снятых в разное время (видно по датам или фенофазам) - такое надо грузить как разные наблюдения.

Единое наблюдение обеспечивает единство данных, экономит время экспертов, ликвидирует лишнюю повторность. Оно нужно для корректности моделей автоматического распознавания.

Всем спасибо за понимание!

Posted on August 22, 2019 08:43 by apseregin apseregin | 5 comments | Leave a comment
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Locations are different than Places, don’t work l for searches.

the place_id numbers in the above examples can be found by using the Filters button on the Explore or Identify screens, then clicking More Filters near bottom, then starting to type a name into the Place box. (Caution: do not use the Location box above the filters, and make sure it is clear and blank - Locations are different than Places, oddly enough, and don’t work as well for searches.)

If what you are looking for comes up as a Place, select it and then you will see your browser address change to include place_id=XXXX, giving you the number for future use. If you plan to search that place a lot, you can set the Place (and any other Filter options) just as you like, then bookmark the resulting page in your browser for future use.

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/import

Posted on August 22, 2019 07:39 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Define import fields from Observation to iNaturalist like Number, ObservadoUr.

Waarnemingen.be In the old project one could add additional observation fields like 'Number', 'Observado Url' , 'Sex' etc. How can i import this into this project field ? The project leaf-and-plant-galls.csv has additional fields like ,Tags,Geoprivacy,Host,Reference URL,Gall Location.
Is it possible to do some nice conversion stuff with the TAG fields ?

OBSERVATION FIELD &field:Observado%20URL
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?verifiable=any&place_id=any&field:Observado%20URL

blockquote

OBSERVATION FIELD &field:Observado%20URL
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations?verifiable=any&place_id=any&field:Observado%20URL
blockquote

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/import

Posted on August 22, 2019 07:31 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Great Kererū Count 2019 - coming soon!

The Great Kererū Count - NZ’s biggest citizen science project dedicated to kererū. This project depends on as many people as possible getting out and about gathering data on kererū. Each year the number of people taking part grows, and last year kererū were voted Bird of the Year, proving just how much New Zealanders love kererū.

Official Website
https://www.greatkererucount.nz

Posted on August 22, 2019 02:24 by kererucount kererucount | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Even more train improvements

Hi folks,

The Vermont Youth Conservation Corps sent an amazing crew to the St. Michael's College Natural Area for two weeks in August. They leveled much of the side slope on the wooded portion of the trail. This will reduce erosion and lower the risk of twisted ankles.

More spectacularly, they built an amazing set of steps to bypass the steepest portion of the trail. We will rope off the old section shortly, but in the mean time, if users would start using the new section it would be appreciated.

Finally, an artist will be erecting some installations on August 23. More details to follow.

Cheers

Declan

Posted on August 22, 2019 00:58 by declanmccabe declanmccabe | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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On the Lookout: Velvet-footed Pax

Howdy coastal CA mycophiles, the summer is waning and our mushroom season is nigh.

It is now prime time to search for Tapinella atrotomentosa in Santa Cruz County (and on the Redwood Coast in general). They appear to be having a good season in the PNW this late summer of 2019. They are often found near rotting wood (almost always coniferous), and are easily recognized by their large size, pronounced fuzzy black stipes, and velvety tan-brown caps.

This species is quite rare in Santa Cruz County (having been found in Henry Cowell Redwood State Park). Any observations you make of this species will be much appreciated.

Here are a few good observations to help you get a sense of what they look like:
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/7420811
http://www.inaturalist.org/observations/4859017

Posted on August 21, 2019 20:33 by leptonia leptonia | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Using iNaturalist Tutorial 2: Making Observations (Website)

Hi everyone, I'm a new admin on this project! I love inaturalist and hope you all do, too. So, here's a tutorial for uploading observations if you aren't using the app (honestly, I prefer the app, but sometimes you gotta use the website - I find its the only way to successfully upload audio files and animated .gif images - which yes, you can do!)

Look here if you want a tutorial for uploading from the app.

Getting Started

So, step one. On the website, you will find there are a lot of ways to do the same thing. Pick whichever upload button tickles your fancy.

Once there, we're going to get this screen:

Drag your files, or click the "Choose files" button to select from a window. Again, whichever tickles your fancy. If you are uploading multiple files for one observation, they will have to be combined into one single observation. More on that at the bottom of this tutorial.

Once a file(s) are added, we will see this:

Great! But, there's a lot going on here! Let's take it a little at a time.

Filling Out the Important Details

First, let's identify what I found here. To do that, we need to click on either of these boxes:

And the computer vision will add suggestions. It's not perfect, but it's a good starter. Let's see what it's suggesting:

Great, I thought so! I'll click there on that suggestion, so it's now identified as a Viceroy!

Now, the observation should have the date it was taken.

This was on a trip, so although it will automatically suggest the current date and time, i need to pick the right date on the calendar provided, or type it in the text box.

Now that that's done, the observation needs a location - where did I find this butterfly?

There's a couple ways I can record this. Since it was a named location, the easiest thing would be for me to type the location into the text box.

Alternatively, I can play around on the map, zoom in, and click on the approximate location I was in.

The border of the red circle can be expanded or shrunk as a sort of margin of error, saying the observation took place somewhere in this circle. As long as the observation was in fact inside of the circle, the location is considered accurate.

Now, after the location, what's left is all optional, but can help give context to our observation.

Optional Details

The "Description" text box is there for you to add any commentary you want.

The dropdown box saying "Location is public" shows the privacy settings of the observation. If this was at my home, I would select the dropdown box and either select to obscure the location (meaning the location is placed randomly in a big box similarly to the circle discussed earlier - the true location of the observation is inside the box, but no one knows where) or make it private (theres no knowing where the observation was). I prefer obscured, because the information is still useful if its just a handful of kilometers off.

To quote the app tutorial:

If you are wondering, “Why is location even important? Why should I bother?” There are a couple answers! First, there are very few species present worldwide. For the most part, in order to identify something, it is essentially to know where it was. Sometimes, you can be vague, and just stating the country is good enough detail to identify something (common for larger animals, like birds and mammals, and larger plants like trees). But other times, you need to be extremely specific. Some insects look nearly identical to each other, but there will be different species living on one side of a mountain range vs the other side, even if they are only 20 miles apart. And also, researchers who are tracking the movement of species in response to climate change can benefit from having access to accurate data–showing that a species of plant is appearing even several miles north each year is crucial to understanding how to manage environmental stewardship.

The "Captive/Cultivated" checkbox should be selected if your observation is not of a wild organism. Pets, zoo animals, and garden plants would fit into this category. Insects you catch from the outside and rear indoors would not count, and are still considered wild.

Now, let's take a look at these things that are sort of hidden away:

(Tags aren't used much, so we're just going to skip that one.)

First, let's have a look at Projects.

If you've been added to this project, all of your observations will be added automatically. But, some projects need observations that fit their theme to be manually added.

When you click on the box, all the projects you joined will show up as suggestions. You can click to choose any project(s) you would like to add your observation to, but despite all the dead [x] projects, I'm not a part of one for butterflies, so it looks like this observation won't be added to any projects at this time.

Moving on, let's look at Fields:

These aren't used often, but they can be really useful on the right observations. I could probably fill some out for this one if I wanted, but I don't know how it died, and I don't really think it's important to say unknown. This one will also go without fields. Unlike projects, you dont need to "join" any fields to add them, but they are more likely to show up once you have used them before. You can just start typing and see what pops up (from my understanding, that is a bit of a peeve some people have with the feature)

Here's some examples of observations with fields:

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/31203103
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/27631192
With these, it shows what the host of the organism being observed is.

https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/26514406
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/17501348
With these, the project "Dead Birds" requests a field filled out for cause of death for any added observations.

Hope that clears that up! Most observations don't make use of that, but it's good to know.

What if I have multiple files for my observation?

Great question! It's important to make sure that all of your files for one observation get put together, otherwise, you'll end up spamming and your observation won't be complete on top of that. Unfortunately, inaturalist doesn't automatically combine them, fortunately, its an easy fix.

So, let's add an open wing picture of my butterfly.

Click "Add" in the top left corner, then choose "Photos or sounds" from the dropdown. Alternatively, drag your files right into the window. If you do it right, it should look like this:

Now, if I post this, I'll end up getting two separate observations, which i don't want, because this is all for the same thing. To combine them, there is a checkbox at the top that says "Select All". When clicked, all the boxes should have a green border (see the difference between the first and second pictures in the above image). Then, by clicking "Combine", they will merge. Alternatively (like I said, there's a lot of ways to do things), you can click and drag one box onto the other to merge them one at a time.

When done successfully, it should look like this:

The images are now stacked! You can tell it didn't go away because there are arrows to look through the stack, and that "2/2" underneath the image that shows how many files are there.

Did all that?

All thats left is to publish, which can be found in the top right corner.

Click that button, and it's done! Yay!

Posted on August 21, 2019 20:16 by kuchipatchis kuchipatchis | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Belize - iNaturalist World Tour

The small but megadiverse country of Belize is the 59th stop on the iNaturalist World Tour! Activity from Belize seems to be a nice mix of residents, visitors, and academic projects. The top observer, @jmeerman, is resident near the capital of Belmopan and runs the biological-diversity.info website on Belize's biodiversity. The third top observer, the mysterious @obevan149 posted many interesting Belize moth observations last year but hasn't been recently active on iNaturalist. @annikaml is a world traveler (posting observations most recently from Uganda) with Belize observations clustered to the northeast of Belmopan. @kha is another visitor with Belize observations clustered near the beautiful Macal River south of San Ignacio. The activity near the Smithsonian Carrie Bow Cay Field Station is from a 2014 Biocube effort led by wildlife photographer extraordinaire @liittschwager with most observations in the @carriebowbiodiversity group account. @callieoldfield, a plant ecology PhD candidate at University of Georgia, recorded observations from a 2011-2013 University of the South: Sewanee Field Study in Belize class in this project. @davidsarkozi, based in Texas, las led over 30 birding trips to Belize and has observations throughout the country. Both @jsatler, a Postdoctoral Researcher at Iowa State University studying fig and fig wasp coevolution. and @dilljone, who focuses on reptiles and amphibians and whose most recent posts are from Belize, have observations clustered near the T.R.E.E.S Research Center along Hummingbird Highway. Don't miss this trip report on a Belize vacation by @lfelliott


The number of observations per month is still quite jagged which indicates that its still influenced by the randomness associated by a relatively few observers - for example, the peak in March of 2018 seems to be mostly driven by visits by @annikaml and @kha. But there has been a clear overall increase in the number of observations per month since about mid 2017 with numbers currently at around 1,000 per month.


@d_kluza is the top identifier and leads in birds, @maractwin is the second top identifier and leads in fish, top observer @jmeerman leads in insect identifications and top observer @dilljone leads in herp identifications. @adorantes, based in the Yucatan, leads in plant identifications. Many thanks to other top identifiers such as @norman-espinoza, @jbroadhead, and @joshuagsmith


What can we do to help connect this mix of residents, visitors, and academic projects in Belize to create a more robust community of Belize iNaturalists? Please share your thoughts below or on this forum thread

@jmeerman @annikaml @obevan149 @carriebowbiodiversity @callieoldfield @d_kluza @maractwin @norman-espinoza @jbroadhead @joshuagsmith

We’ll be back tomorrow in Ireland!

Posted on August 21, 2019 19:41 by loarie loarie | 4 comments | Leave a comment
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KeyBase

KeyBase: (from the homepage) is a database and web application for managing and deploying interactive pathway keys to plants, animals and other groups of organisms:
https://keybase.rbg.vic.gov.au/

Posted on August 21, 2019 19:11 by blue_celery blue_celery | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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KeyBase

KeyBase: (from the homepage) is a database and web application for managing and deploying interactive pathway keys to plants, animals and other groups of organisms:
https://keybase.rbg.vic.gov.au/

Posted on August 21, 2019 19:11 by blue_celery blue_celery | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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3000 наблюдений! 500 видов!

3,006
OBSERVATIONS

500
SPECIES

176
IDENTIFIERS

63
OBSERVERS

Posted on August 21, 2019 18:50 by apseregin apseregin | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Bay Area happy hour, 6pm Friday August 23 at Lost & Found in Oakland

Hey all, just a reminder for anyone reading here that we'll be grabbing drinks at Lost & Found Beer Garden at Telegraph & 21st in Oakland (note that this is *not* the cocktail lounge in SF and not some kind of clothing store in downtown Oakland) this Friday at 6pm.

Also, if my last-minute journal posts don't really work for you, I have been trying to schedule these on meetup:

https://www.meetup.com/iNaturalist-Happy-Hour-SF-East-Bay/events/263267875/

Some folks I've mentioned before: @moonlittrails, @morgancantrell, @screws, @radrat, @ang, @anna-towers, @ericsimons, @leftcoastnaturalist, @joeysantore, @eddiebug, @marisa, @ouzel, @catchang, @damontighe, @clem, @jennitaur, @sea-kangaroo, @loloscheiner, @adrained, @rademacherdan, @hfabian, @marmot-mot, @birdingman

Posted on August 21, 2019 17:54 by kueda kueda | 8 comments | Leave a comment
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15 000 наблюдений! 900 видов! 500 экспертов! 600 наблюдателей!

Дорогие москвичи!

За последние сутки - и вновь совершенно случайно - мы преодолели четыре важных рубежа.

21 августа 2019 г. в 22:04 в наш проект "Флора Москвы" было добавлено 15 000-е наблюдение.
Спустя несколько минут - 900-й вид.
22 августа 2019 г. к 17:00 в Москве появился 600-й наблюдатель, а определение сделал 500-й эксперт.

В проекта "Флора России" Москва идёт на первом месте по числу наблюдений и по числу наблюдателей. По числу видов мы занимаем пока пятое место.

Статистика проекта:
15,113 Observations - 901 Species - 501 Identifiers - 601 Observers

Напоминаем, что наш проект посвящен дикорастущим растениям. Растения, снятые в культуре, в зачет не идут. Пожалуйста, все наблюдения видов, сделанные в горшках, на клумбах, в регулярном городском озеленении (деревья и кусты), на полках цветочных магазинов и в ботанических садах, снабжайте специальной галочкой при загрузке. Если, на ваш взгляд, растение дичает, само возобновляется или выросло из случайно просыпанных семян, обязательно сообщайте об этом в заметке к наблюдению, иначе эксперты сами поставят галочку "культурное".

Спасибо!

Posted on August 21, 2019 17:41 by apseregin apseregin | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Reminder: Wrap-up event this Saturday!

We're in the final days of the Butterfly Blitz - but there is still time to get a few more observations in!

And, there is also still time to register for the wrap-up event being held this Saturday. We'd love to see you there - please visit the link below and let us know if you are coming.

DETAILS
Where: Terra Cotta Conservation Area, Watershed Learning Centre
14452 Winston Churchill Blvd, Terra Cotta, ON L0P 1N0
When: August 24, 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
RSVP: Please visit the CVC Events website to register for this event so that we know you're coming
https://cvc.ca/event/butterfly-blitz-wrap-up-celebration/
(see Register Online link at bottom of the page)

Thanks,
Laura

Posted on August 21, 2019 17:33 by lltimms lltimms | 2 comments | Leave a comment
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Νέο πρόγραμμα καταγραφής των γυμνοβράγχιων στην Ελλάδα.

Ένας από τους βασικούς μας στόχους είναι η καταγραφή της βιοποικιλότητας της Ελλάδας. Για να το πετύχουμε αυτό χρειαζόμαστε την βοήθεια των πολιτών (λέγεται επιστήμη των πολιτών - citizen science), όπου οι πολίτες βάζουν τις καταγραφές τους και οι επιστήμονες κάνουν επαλήθευση των δεδομένων...

Αυτό το νέο project τώρα στοχεύει στην καταγραφή των γυμνοβράγχιων (nudibranchs).
Υπολογίζονται ότι υπάρχουν άνω των 60 ειδών στην Ελλάδα και μερικά είδη είναι τόσο μικροσκοπικά (κάτι χιλιοστά) όσο το 1/4 του μικρού νυχιού στο χέρι, ενώ υπάρχουν και μεγαλύτερα γυμνοβράγχια που φτάνουν κάτι δεκάδες εκατοστά. Για όσους δεν ξέρουν τι είναι τα γυμνοβράγχια μπορούν να διαβάσουν το άρθρο: Τι είναι τα γυμνοβράγχια (Nudibranchs) και πόσα είδη έχουμε στην Ελλάδα;

Γενικώς τα γυμνοβράγχια μπορούμε εύκολα να τα βρούμε εκεί που υπάρχουν σπόγγοι, με βάθος από 1 μέτρο έως αρκετά δεκάδες μέτρα υποβρυχίως (συνήθως άνω των 3-4 μέτρων.

Πως όμως μπορεί κάποιος να συμμετάσχει;

​Για να συμμετάσχει κάποιος το μόνο που πρέπει να κάνει είναι να βάζει τις καταγραφές του εδώ στο inaturalist, και εφ' όσον έχει taxa name και δεν αφήνετε κενό (άμα δεν ξέρετε μπορείτε να βάζετε "nudibranchia" σαν όνομα και θα υπάρχουν ταξινομιστές που θα το διορθώνουν και θα βάζουν το είδος που είναι) και τοποθεσία εντός της Ελλάδας εμείς θα παίρνουμε τα δεδομένα.

Μπορείτε να παρακολουθείτε μέσα από το αντίστοιχο πρότζεκτ: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/sea-slugs-of-greece

Γιατί όμως στο inaturalist;

Διότι υπάρχουν και άλλα προγράμματα καταγραφής των γυμνοβράγχιων (ευρωπαϊκά και παγκόσμια) όπου με αυτό τον τρόπο βοηθάτε και σε αυτά τα προγράμματα αλλά δεν χρειάζεται να γίνεται διπλή και τριπλή δουλειά από τις οργανώσεις και ερευνητές και ούτε να χαθούν χρόνια προσπαθώντας να αποκτήσουν τέτοια χρήσιμα δεδομένα.

Εμείς καλούμε όλους τους δύτες, υποβρύχιους φωτογράφους και πολίτες να αφιερώσουν λίγο χρόνο να βάζουν τις καταγραφές τους.

Επίσης αν έχετε παλαιότερες καταγραφές μπορείτε να τις ανεβάσετε, ώστε να είμαστε σε θέση να γνωρίζουμε ποια είδη γυμνοβράγχιων έχουμε, αν έχουν έρθει ξενικά είδη (λόγω της τροπικοποίησης της Μεσογείου), να μπορούμε να βοηθάμε άλλους με το να αναγνωρίζουμε ποιο είδος είδανε, αλλά και να μπορέσουμε να φτιάξουμε και νέο οδηγό πεδίου (δωρεάν εννοείται) για τις επόμενες γενιές.

Για όσους θέλουν υπάρχει ένας οδηγός πεδίου (http://www.naturagraeca.com/ws/195,257,1,Γυμνοβράγχια) από το naturagraeca, με αρκετά είδη όπου μπορεί να σας βοηθήσει αν θέλετε να προσπαθήσετε να αναγνωρίσετε μόνοι σας το είδος που είδατε.

Και πάνω απ' όλα κοινοποίηστε αυτή την προσπάθεια διότι μπορεί να υπάρχουν γνωστοί και φίλοι σας που να έχουν καταγραφές από γυμνοβράγχια.

Posted on August 21, 2019 16:41 by ctaklis ctaklis | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Camping? Think about your firewood!

Here is a wonderful website i want to share (and I hope you'll share it too). This site brings attention to the problem of invasive species being carried around in firewood.
https://www.dontmovefirewood.org
For my Texas friends, here's a nice brochure you can share: http://www.dontmovefirewood.org/wp-content/uploads/TNCO_Brochure_Texas_1.pdf
If you're traveling, use this site to find where to buy firewood locally:
http://firewoodscout.org
Notice there are very few vendors listed? Do you know anybody that sells firewood? You can ask them to list their business!

Posted on August 21, 2019 16:15 by ellen5 ellen5 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Guadalupe Mountains

Smith Spring Trail, Pine Spring Campground, and Guadalupe Peak Trail.

Posted on August 21, 2019 15:01 by stephenramirez stephenramirez | 35 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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10,000 OBSERVATIONS!!!

we reached 10,000 flowering plants observations in Turkey on I-Naturalist! Since mid-May, when the collection project started, we have added over 3200 new observation of flowering plants for Turkey on ID, 1000 of which identified to the species level! Many more identifications of older observations are happening.
Very soon, a group of botanists around the world will be able to use this data to map the distribution of species for which this information currently does not exist, and will use this information to identify hotspots of conservation priorities for plants.

thank you everyone for the great effort!
Piero

Posted on August 21, 2019 14:53 by pierov pierov | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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2019 July - Bali, Indonesia

26-29 July 2019 Southern and Northern Bali

A few notable observations from the trip :
Delias periboea and Cepora temena

Grey Glassy Tiger and Zebra Blue

Toal observations :191 records, 90+ species, 30+ identifiers.
-- Plant : 11+ species,
-- Bird : 3 species,
-- Butterfly : 34 species,
-- Moth : 70+ observations ,

Posted on August 21, 2019 11:04 by gancw1 gancw1 | 29 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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