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70. Hoe zit het nu met Voorvader Ontkenningen

https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/25514-clarifying-ancestor-disagreements

Wat is een Gemeenschap taxon ?

Every observation with at least one identification has what we call an Observation Taxon. This is the label shown at the top of the observation page and is the taxon that the observations is "filed under" on the tree of life.

The Community Taxon (also sometimes called the Community Identification) is a way to derive a single identification from multiple identifications provided by the community. If an observation has more than one identification, it will also have a Community Taxon. The Observation Taxon will match the Community Taxon unless: (a) the observer has opted out of the Community Taxon, (b) there is an identification of a finer taxon that hasn’t been disagreed with (more on disagreements shortly).

Identifications hang on nodes on the tree of life. An identification adds an agreement with that node and also all of that nodes ancestors back to the root of the taxonomy.



If two identifications are on different branches of the tree of life, they each count as an agreement for the branch they are on and a disagreement for every node on the other branch back to the common ancestor of the two branches.



Each node is scored with the cumulative number of Agreements (i.e. the identifications on it or its descendants), the total number of Disagreements (from identifications on other branches), and something called "Ancestor Disagreements" which we’ll describe shortly.

The Community Taxon is the finest ranked taxon with at least two agreements where the ratio of the number of agreements to the sum of agreements, disagreements, and ancestor disagreements is greater than ⅔.

In contrast, the Observation Taxon will always match the Community Taxon unless:

a) there is just a single identification, then the Observation Taxon will be defined by that identification

b) the observer opts out of the Community Taxon, then the Observation Taxon will be defined by the observers identification

c) there are no disagreements and there is an identifications of descendants of the Community Taxon, then the Observation Taxon will be defined by the finest such identification (because the community likes that a single non-controversial identification being able to ‘move the ball forward’)*

*if that finest identification is of infra-species rank (eg subspecies), the Observation Taxon won't roll forward to that rank from the Community Taxon if that identification was added later (because the community doesn't like what would be Research Grade observations at species rank being rolled forward to Needs ID observations at infra-species rank). However, if the Observation Taxon was initially set at infra-species rank from a single identification, a non-disagreeing identification of an ancestor won't roll the Observation Taxon back to the Community Taxon.

What are Ancestor Disagreements?

So what are Ancestor Disagreements? If one person adds an identification of one node and another person thinks it’s not that but can’t provide an alternative on another branch, they might add an identification of an ancestor of that node. For example, I might add an identification of Seven-spotted Lady Beetle, but you might add an identification of the family lady beetles, which contains that and many other species.



When the Community Taxon was first implemented, any identification made after previous finer identifications in time was implied to be a disagreement with these finer taxa. These ‘implicit ancestor disagreements’ are now labeled as such.



They only disagree with taxa associated with previous finer identifications. Also some bugs were fixed in how the Community ID charts on the observation page handle "implicit ancestor disagreements".

What are Explicit Disagreements?

Because of confusion about whether people were disagreeing or not, we later made ancestor disagreements "explicit". When an identification is made that is an ancestor of the Community Taxon (or the Observation Taxon if there’s only one identification), the identifier is now presented with a choice to indicate whether they are disagreeing with the Community Taxon or not.

If they are not disagreeing, their identification does not count as an ancestor disagreement for the taxon that was the Community Taxon.



And the identification is not labeled as a disagreement:



However, If they are disagreeing, their identification counts as an "explicit ancestor disagreement" with the Community Taxon.



And the identification is labeled accordingly:

Two ways to disagree...

When we implemented this, we thought that ancestor disagreeing should disagree with the entire branch below the disagreeing identification i.e. “I disagree that this is Seven-spotted Lady Beetle and all taxa on the branch between Seven-spotted Lady Beetle and the taxon I have proposed”. Let’s call this the “Branch Disagreement” way to disagree.

We’ve since come to realize that our communication about this was inconsistent and confusing, based on numerous discussions with community members in person and in the Forum. Furthermore, these discussions suggest the community interprets disagreeing as just with the Community Taxon i.e. “I disagree that this is Seven-spotted Lady Beetle but not the whole branch below the taxon I have proposed”. Let’s call this the “Leading Disagreement” way to disagree. We’ve also since realized from the Forum that Leading Disagreement is a more common and less controversial way to disagree than Branch Disagreement.

At the end of this post, we’ll discuss planned changes to improve things moving forward. But for now, let’s try to clarify our communication describing how things are currently behaving to all get on the same page.

Imagine the following sequence of identifications:

Branch Disagreement tallies disagreements as follows:

Which differs from how one would tally disagreements for the Leading Disagreement case:

Notice that this can impact how the Community Taxon is calculated. In this example, Branch Disagreement computes the Community Taxon as Lady Beetles Family:

While Leading Disagreement would compute it as Asian Lady Beetle:

The site is currently assuming Branch Disagreement as it calculates the Community Taxon. We tried to capture the language for the Potential Disagreement question to distinguish "not disagreeing" with "branch disagreeing" as:



To more precisely capture how the Community Taxon was being calculated this could have been worded something like:

Likewise, Ancestor disagreement identifications could have been more precisely labeled something like the following to reflect how the Community Taxon is being calculated.

Planned changes to distinguishing the two ways to disagree

While we hope the above description will help clear up much of the confusion with how iNaturalist is handling explicit ancestor disagreements, we’ve also learned that these two ways of disagreeing (branch and leading) are distinct and both useful. While "leading disagreement" is clearly the most commonly-used way to disagree, we still think that "branch disagreement" is useful, particularly in enabling the community to stop observations from becoming too finely identified beyond where the community can be certain.

We’re working on changes that would enable identifiers to indicate which way (leading or branch) they are disagreeing. The Potential Disagreement prompt will have three questions:



Here the first orange button would mean a "leading disagreement" and the second would mean a "branch disagreement".

Likewise, "leading disagreement" identifications will be decorated as:



and "branch disagreement" identifications will be decorated as:

Apologies for the length of this post, but we hope it clarifies some of the confusion about how the "ancestor disagreement" functionality is currently working and planned improvements to address concerns expressed in the forum.

https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/25514-clarifying-ancestor-disagreements

Prof. Mulder van TU Delft heeft een lezing gegeven over de Battolyser een innovatie op basis van een ruim 150 jaar oud principe van een ijzer-accu. Deze technologie heeft het in zich om aan zowel de korte als lange termijn energie-opslag en afgifte behoefte te voorzien.

https://www.tudelft.nl/en/technology-transfer/development-innovation/research-exhibition-projects/battolyser/

https://www.battolyserbv.com/2019/05/02/first-battolyser-for-electricity-storage-and-hydrogen-production-thanks-to-waddenfonds-in-groningen/

22 januarii
Energie transitie! Jazeker, maar hoe?
Prof.dr.ir. N.G. Deen
Power & Flow, Werktuigbouwkunde,
Technische Universiteit Eindhoven
https://www.ngm1780.nl/events/energie-transitie-jazeker-maar-hoe/

26 februari
“Klaar voor de toekomst”, de ontwikkeling van het hoogspanningsnet in Zeeland
Gert Aanhaanen, Peter Kwakman, Bart van Hulst
Afdeling netstrategie
TenneT TSO B.V.
https://www.ngm1780.nl/events/electriciteitsdistributie/

9 april
Het energiesysteem van de toekomst in Zeeland
dr. Ir. A. Jongepier
energietransitie
Enduris, Goes
https://www.ngm1780.nl/events/electriciteit-in-zeeland/

Posted on January 22, 2021 17:05 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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A Brief History of Texas Lepidoptera Observations on iNaturalist

As part of a research project on the distibutional biases of citizen science data such as iNaturalist, I have been examining the uploads of Lepidoptera observations (butterflies and moths) in my home state of Texas. I chose Lepidoptera because of my own particular taxonomic interests and because it offers a finite set of data to analyze. Here I present some details of the history of iNat uploads as background. All the data recited below are complete as of December 31, 2020, with most of the statistics accessed through the Explore page in the first few weeks of January 2021.

Figure 1a (below) shows a heat map of all the available Lepidoptera observations in Texas at the end of 2020. This can be compared to the distribution of all forms of life as shown in Figure 1b. These are intriguing maps but I'll reserve more discussion of them until I complete my research project. As of 31 December 2020, a total of 541,588 observations of Lepidoptera in Texas had been uploaded to iNaturalist by 26,022 observers (Fig. 1a). By iNaturalist's calculation, these document a total of 3,429 species or about 62% of the documented Texas Lep fauna, which stands at about 5,502 species (fide @krancmm).

Fig 1a-b

History of uploads, observations, and observer base. iNaturalist was established with the first uploads by the U.C. Berkeley-based developers of the platform in March 2008 (@kueda et al.). The first Texas observation on the platform was, appropriately, an image of Texas Bluebonnets uploaded on 25 March 2008 by @lisa_and_robb:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/47
The next three years saw only limited and apparently experimental uploads of a few Texas observations. The first Texas Lepidoptera upload of a recent living example was a Gulf Fritillary larva observed 23 August 2011 and uploaded 31 August 2011 by Kari Gaukler (@atxnaturalist):
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/29772
In that first year of uploads (2011), just three observers uploaded a total of five observations documenting four species. Since those early uploads, several hundred observers have also uploaded historical observations which predate the rollout of iNaturalist; the earliest "observations" of Lepidoptera in Texas now available on iNaturalist are actually digital images of museum specimens collected as far back as 1938:
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/38371826
Because of such uploads of historical records, a compilation of Texas Lepidoptera observations on the platform now shows some 7,587 observations through calendar year 2011. More widespread use of the platform started in 2012. Over the next five year period (2012-16), 2,664 contributors uploaded over 49,000 additional observations. The next watershed moment in the use of the platform came in 2017 when Texas began participation in iNaturalist's City Nature Challenge. From 2017 through 2020, 24,422 contributors uploaded nearly a half million additional observations. Table 1 (below) charts the growth of Lepidoptera uploads for the ten year time frame from the first uploads through 2020.

Growth of TX Lep Uploads

The set of figures below present heat maps of Texas Lepidoptera observations (including "historic" observations uploaded more recently) for periods representing (a) the entire 20th Century, (b) 2000 through 2009, (c) 2010 through 2019, and (d) just the observations for calendar year 2020. Available "historic" observations (i.e. through 2007) are still modest in number, particularly for the period of the 20th Century (Fig. 2a, b), predating the era of widespread digital photography. Numbers of available observations vastly increases after 2010 (Fig. 2c), mostly representing uploads of contemporary observations. For a variety of socioeconomic reasons in 2020, not the least of which was the Covid-19 pandemic, an increase of 44.5% in the total number of observers lead to a 50.6% increase in the total number of observations compared to the total number through the end of 2019 (Fig. 2d).

Fig 2a-d

My ongoing research will examine the geographic aspects of such data including comparisons to the distribution of the Texas population (an obvious comparison) and the distribution and efforts of iNaturalists who have contributed the observations.

I'm grateful to @sambiology, @mako252, @krancmm, @tiwane, and @loarie for help with some of this data and their early input on the direction of this project.

Posted on January 22, 2021 16:59 by gcwarbler gcwarbler | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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20000 наблюдений!

Дорогие друзья!

Около 3 месяцев у нас ушло на достижение очередной круглой цифры 20000 наблюдений. Число видов достигло 1170, экспертов 545, наблюдателей 263. 20000-е наблюдение загрузила Irina Bashkevich!

Всех поздравляем с отличным результатом! Движемся дальше!

Posted on January 22, 2021 16:31 by vladimirov vladimirov | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Скоро День орнитолога

Дорогие друзья! Спасибо Вам за активное участие в проекте Российская зима 2020-2021! Наблюдения за зимующими в Тульской области птицами ведутся на высоком уровне. Больше 1000 документированных данных о 55 видах! Многие из Вас почти не знают друг друга, но вместе - уже настоящая команда. У нас есть отличный повод встретиться и познакомиться друг с другом поближе. 19 февраля в России отмечают как День орнитолога. Благодаря гостеприимству Тульского экзотариума мы могли бы собраться, пообщаться и скромно отметить это событие в стенах нового здания зоопарка в Центральном парке культуры и отдыха им. П.П. Белоусова 12 или 19 февраля. Очень вероятно, что в гости к нам приедет замечательный зоолог, орнитолог Евгений Коблик. Чтобы лучше подготовиться из-за некоторых формальностей, сообщите нам, пожалуйста, хотели бы Вы и могли бы прийти на это мероприятие 12 или 19 числа во второй половине дня. Написать можно в комментариях под этим сообщением или в личном сообщении мне. С уважением, Смирнова Елена.
@apus_apus
@rom86
@marina-privalova
@igor_scherbakov
@adeev
@ludaalimova
@vadim_shulgin
@uroboros
@anyuta
@naturalist25051
@sergeilysenkov
@margosha
@jt_f
@anastasia182

Posted on January 22, 2021 16:30 by elenasmirnova elenasmirnova | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Range extended to the Exclusive Economic Zone of Portugal

Due to some species being pelagic it's only natural that the project includes records outside the territorial boundaries of Portugal but within its Exclusive Economic Zone. This adds one more species to the Project checklist, Fiona pinnata.

Posted on January 22, 2021 15:01 by jpsilva jpsilva | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Определение пчёл подсемейства Nomiinae (Halictidae) России

Ключ к родам и видам России и сопредельных стран:
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/251086591_Bees_of_the_subfamily_Nomiinae_Hymenoptera_Halictidae_of_Russia_and_adjacent_countries_Keys_to_genera_and_species
Рукопись о семействе в России:
https://www.zin.ru/boards/00222301/materials/archive/AstafurovaYV.pdf
Сайт с фотографиями многих видов (с признаками, важными для определения):
Pseudapis http://www.atlashymenoptera.net/page.aspx?id=83
Nomiapis (в систематике iNat в составе Pseudapis) http://www.atlashymenoptera.net/page.aspx?id=72
Lipotriches http://www.atlashymenoptera.net/page.aspx?id=91
Acunomia (в систематике iNat subg. Nomia) http://www.atlashymenoptera.net/page.aspx?id=170
Hoplomia (в систематике iNat subg. Nomia) http://www.atlashymenoptera.net/page.aspx?id=133

Posted on January 22, 2021 11:50 by melodi_96 melodi_96 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Delta pyriforme-nest building

The summers are becoming too warm and the heat is unbearable. At the same time, a significant decrease in the availability of water makes more difficult. At this point, do we think about other organisms around us? It always remains as a question.
The theme of this year's Biodiversity day is "OUR SOLUTIONS ARE IN NATURE". This is explicitly true.Only the one who sense it could recognize it.During this lockdown days, I came to know that my homestead is rich in biodiversity since there was a lot of time during this period.
There was a sight, which surprised me a lot. A wasp like creature was flying around the wet clothes kept for drying. It flew away in a matter of seconds after sucking water from it.Though I don't know where it was going, it was coming at the spot several times.
The next day, there was no clothes left for drying. Surprisingly I saw it flying around the well!, the only source of water.It was sucking the water content from the rope which was used to take water.While reaching the rope, it's wings were still and after the intake, a sudden flight was noticed.
Finally I found it in my house. There was also a mud nest nearby.After seeing the mudnest, I understood that it is potterwasp.The wonderful architecture of the 'pot' like mud nest is always a beauty.
The potterwasp uses the water for building this nest.While reaching the water source, the suck the water inwards and release them on reaching a place where they could get good granular soil by the process of regurgitation. After mixing the water with the soil, they would make a mud ball and will carry it to the construction site. The potter wasp entered my house though a window which was kept open. The nest was also near to the window.
For now, the work of the first cell was completed.Interestingly, I could spot a green caterpillar inside. Afterwards, the potterwasp closed the opening of the cell.I waited for the construction of the next cell so that I could understand their nesting behavior from the beginning.After my great expectations
For now, the work of the first cell was completed.Interestingly, I could spot a green caterpillar inside. Afterwards, the potterwasp closed the opening of the cell.I waited for the construction of the next cell so that I could understand their nesting behavior from the beginning.After a period of time, the potterwasp came lighting my expectations and started the work for building nest. Small balls of mud were brought from the backyard. With a small mud ball, construction continues for two minutes. So it needs many balls to build a big nest.It is very interesting to see how the mason builts the house. The head is moved forward with the help of a pair of frontlegs. https://www.inaturalist.org/photos/85750477
There is an ivory like part at the bottom of the head, near mouth, the mandibles.
With it's help, the potterwasp digs the soil. The next two pair of legs helps them to stand firm.With the head yellow there are two large black shiny compound eyes. The movement of the heads will surely doubt us whether they are telling something to us.Their thorax is half yellow half reddish brown and the abdomen is reddish brown and yellow, with a black stripe in middle
Work on the second cell was completed.After that, I saw it folding it abdomen into the cell.Now I understood it was about to lay the eggs.Soon after laying eggs, she disappeared. After sometime, she came. But wasn't alone.A green moth caterpillar was also with her.She put the caterpillar inside and left the place. I wondered why the caterpillar was unable to escape through the hole in her absence?.She came again with another caterpillar and put it into the cell.A wonderful feast by the mother wasp for her beloved ones.
I took a glimpse towards their life.The main food of an adult potterwasp is flower nectar. Once they undergo mating, the female potterwasp collects the sperms from the male.Later it is all the female who are actually seen in the scenario. After mating, the females searches and finds a suitable place for building nest.
Now she starts to build the nest.Once she completes the work , its time to lay the eggs.She can decide the sex of eggs they lay.That is, if the egg is fertilised with the sperm which was collected during mating, it will be a female.If it is unfertilized, then the eggs will be males. After laying eggs,her duty shifts into finding food for the larvae that comes after hatching. Their major preys are lepidopteran caterpillars and spiders. After stinging the caterpillars, she takes them with her.After putting them inside the cell, she closed the opening of the cell.Then the cell is covered once again with mud.This is because other wasps could enter inside the cell and destroy the eggs and lay their own eggs.Now she has no role left with that cell. She starts to build the next one.Finally on completion of the nest, she leaves.I saw five cells built by her.
They belong to order Hymnoptera, Eumeninae subfamily of the vespidae family. The potterwasp which visited my house was Delta pyriforme.
They do not lead a social life. Generally wasps are very violent. But potterwasps are not violent as others. We could observe them without fear. But make sure that it is not being hurted.
We need to understand that it is not very easy for a potterwasp to buid it's nest.Finding a suitable place, building nest, laying eggs, search for prey, paralyzing them, putting them into the cell creates thousands of questions in our mind.
The honeybees understands a place through waggle dance.But how does a potterwasp finds the correct position of her nest, water source, soil source etc.
The answer is when they start to fly, there is a zig zag movement at the beginning. They considers some signs to keep the position in mind. We can always see this test flight before they start flying.
Many days passed. The eggs inside the nest hatched. The larvae ate the reserved food.The adult potterwasps came out of the cell with the help of secretions from mouth.When Delta pyriforme left, the next guest came to the same nest. It was a muddauber was in the genus Chalybyon.Many other creatures enters the used nests of potterwasps. Afterall, it is very exciting to observe them. The joy of finding them is indescribable.
Documentation video : https://youtu.be/atuYmG2Yi_k
Potter wasp feeding on flower nectar : https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/57229371

Posted on January 22, 2021 11:19 by unnikrishnan_mp unnikrishnan_mp | 2 observations | 2 comments | Leave a comment
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Atlas Paddenstoelen Drenthe

Atlas Paddenstoelen Drenthe



Voorzijde van de folder van de Ecologische Atlas van Paddenstoelen in Drenthe met de omslagen van de drie delen. Deze atlas is in gedrukte vorm uitverkocht.


Bij de oprichting van de Paddenstoelen Werkgroep Drenthe in 1999 was de belangrijkste doelstelling een vlakdekkende inventarisatie van de mycoflora in Drenthe en het publiceren van de resultaten in boekvorm. Dit doel is in 2015 verwezenlijkt met de publicatie van de driedelige Ecologische Atlas van Paddenstoelen in Drenthe. Helaas was de hele oplage van het boek in 2018 uitverkocht. Het is alleen nog antiquarisch te koop. Een herdruk wordt niet verwacht. Daarom heeft het bestuur van de PWD in december 2019 besloten om de volledige inhoud van deze atlas op onze website te plaatsen, zodat deze voor alle belangstellenden toegankelijk is.


Op deze pagina staan alle hoofdstukken van deze atlas als afzonderlijke items. Ze kunnen hier worden geraadpleegd en ze kunnen als PDF file worden gedownload voor privé gebruik.
Op deze webversie zijn de auteursrechten van toepassing die ook gelden voor de Atlas in boekvorm: Niets uit deze uitgave mag worden verveelvoudigd en/of openbaar gemaakt door middel van druk, microfilm, fotokopie of op welke andere wijze ook, zonder voorafgaande schriftelijke toestemming van de eerste auteur.
Eerste auteur: Eef Arnolds; eefarnolds@gmail.com.
—————————————————————————————————————————————-


On this page the complete content can be found of the ‘Ecologische Atlas van Paddenstoelen in Drenthe‘, published by ‘Werkgroep Paddenstoelen Kartering Drenrthe’. The printed version (2015) is sold-out and will not be printed again. Each chapter can be consulted and may be downloaded as PDF file for private use.
On this webversion the same copyright applies as for the printed version: No part of this book may be reproduced in any form by print, microfilm or any other means without written permission from the first author.
First author: Eef Arnolds; eefarnolds@gmail.com.

DEEL 1 INLEIDING

DEEL 2 GRASLANDEN, HEIDEN, MOERASSEN EN CULTUURLAND

DEEL 3 LOOF- EN NAALDBOSSEN


Posted on January 22, 2021 10:45 by optilete optilete | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Bungendore - Spooks Hill - Summer- January 22

It's been a while since I walked up to Spooks Hill and it's interesting to see the grasses once green are tall and dry, their seed heads nodding in the breeze. The native raspberry Rubus parvifolius have sweet, red berries though they are desiccating on the brambles. The Scotch Thistle Onoporium acanthium seems to have been taken over by a new type of thistle that I've never seen before but looks to be Carthamus lanatus.

I spotted another plant I hadn't seen before. It looks like some kind of Eryngos but I can't be sure what kind. There was also a tree heaving with small yellow fruit. They tasted like plums so I'm assuming that the tree was a yellow fruiting Cherry-Plum Prunus cerasifera. I wasn't sure if several of the purple flowering plants along the path were Paterson's Curse Echium plantagineum because they don't look like the ID photos.

Posted on January 22, 2021 09:36 by froggie79 froggie79 | 5 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Thoughts on the challenges of spider-IDing on iNaturalist

Long effortpost TL;DR: I am proposing that the people who help identify spiders on iNat (though this probably also applies to many other groups of small arthropods) make more liberal use of the Data Quality Assessment flag "No, it's as good as it can get" when we believe it is unlikely an observation will ever get a more specific ID. This is intended to be a conversation starter among the handful of people who follow spiders and help with identification. Again, this is not entirely specific to spiders but that's my area of study/interest so that's how I wrote this out.


Recently I spent a couple of weeks trying to review "all" of the Texas spider observations in Needs-ID state and give reasonable IDs where I could (even just moving from Order -> Family for later review). For people who have spent a lot of time sorting through these buckets, you are probably familiar with some of the headaches. For a variety of reasons, many observations are simply not identifiable to any reasonable level (say, Family). After some discussion with a few of the other active identifiers, we decided it would be helpful to start tagging "unidentifiable" observations as such - using the Data Quality Assessment flag labeled "No, it's as good as it can get." This will turn the observation to either Research Grade or Casual depending on the community taxon level and (maybe?) the number of people who agree with that assessment. So it will be filtered out of most peoples' (default) identify criteria.

My main motivation for doing this is the steady increase in observations outpacing the ability of the identifiers to keep up with - There is a limited number of people actively reviewing spiders in North America (my main focus but also the bulk of observations) while iNat's popularity is increasing. So the number of observations is growing rapidly, and the number of identifiers seems to be either flat or dropping. I don't have exact numbers (although certainly the data is out there) but I recall from previous conversations that in 2019 the number of Needs-ID (Araneae / United States) was approaching 200k. By mid-2020 it was over 300k, and at the end of 2020 it was over 400k. Over 40% of the total observations in iNat's history were uploaded in 2020 alone. Going through these buckets is fairly time consuming if you are trying to be accurate and (even better) helpful. Over a 2-week period (probably averaging ~8 hours a day) I reviewed something like 20 thousand observations (rough guess) and made about 5-6 thousand IDs - mostly to family or genus. Probably less than 10% of those IDs were specific and probably only a couple percent actually resulted in an observation reaching RG. Of course I spent a lot of time consulting the literature and BugGuide, trying to include helpful comments where I could, etc. - so I was not going for maximum speed, but still was attempting to get through as much as I could in the time I had. Just trying to give a rough idea of the time it would take an average(ish) person to work through a pile of a given size. A month of work and 10,000+ IDs later and I feel like I'm about where I started.

Anyway, before long I decided to start marking observations I considered plainly "unidentifiable," to remove them from Needs-ID status. The rough criteria I initially used was that, due to the photo quality, I couldn't confidently place the observation in any particular family, and I doubt anyone else could either. I did not apply this to anything with clear photos that I simply wasn't familiar with, nor did I apply it to confusing taxa like the many similar-looking Agelenidae, Philodromidae, Thomisidae, Dictynidae, etc., where it was a good enough photo(s) but I couldn't identify it further. Because probably there is someone out there who studies the Dictynidae and is familiar enough with the patterns to make better IDs (even if that happens years later) and I don't want to get in the way of that. Basically, just photos where the quality/focus/angles could not justify even a family level ID. One example would be a photo of a "typical" orb web with no spider - so you could give an ID of Araneoidea (could be Araneidae, Tetragnathidae, maybe Uloboridae?) - but is it really necessary to keep that as "Needs ID" ? In most cases I left a copy/paste comment along the lines of "Unfortunately there is likely not enough detail to give a more specific ID" or "It is an orbweaver but I can't be sure which kind" so the observer at least knew that someone reviewed it.

Examples of where I have been applying this:

  • Photos that are plainly too blurry or distant to even suggest a family
  • Photos that are too dark and I could not improve sufficiently with basic photo editing software
  • Night photos lit with flash (mostly orbweavers in webs) where only the rough shape is visible
  • (Most) shed exoskeletons that do not seem to have identifying features other than 8 legs
  • Partial/abandoned webbing with no animal visible
  • Multiple possible species/genera and definitely not enough detail in the photos to be more specific

A lot of these are cell phone images from users who made an iNat account, posted an observation or ten, then never came back. Many of them seem to be what we call "duress users" - students who had to make X number of observations for a school assignment, then never came back. I definitely support that (we want more people to discover iNat) but it leaves a lot of "frass" as BugGuide calls it. Also I want to make clear that I fully appreciate the challenge of making good photos of tiny (often moving) animals and I am not trying to criticize anyone's photography. Spiders are difficult to photograph well, even with dedicated equipment (I still suck at it) and I don't want to discourage people from submitting these observations. But at this point iNat has a rapidly growing pile of spider photos that I feel will never even be reviewed, and I think removing "unidentifiable" things from Needs-ID as we go will eventually help the small group of people who are willing to spend their time on this. Of course I know it is not really possible to make a definite ID without the specimen in hand, and for that reason many observations may never reach RG, and that's fine. But there are 1000s of cases where we have the same photos being reviewed by the same 5 or 6 people over the course of several years, each individually making the determination that "It looks like some type of orbweaver maybe but that's the best I can do" and then it is left there for the next person. Which eats up a lot of time and seems unproductive/frustrating to IDers. So I am trying to find a way to make things better without being too aggressive/critical or accidentally "hiding" something that could be scientifically interesting.

Some other ideas I have had in parallel with this:

  • An Observation Field indicating the observation has (multiple) high quality photos - for easier review, maybe by more seasoned arachnologists.

    Could be particularly helpful for the smaller or more cryptic spiders like Erigoninae/Linyphiinae, Thomisidae, uncommon Therirdiids, etc. The idea being that we could present a more curated subset of high quality observations (e.g. all of wildcarrot's photos :) ) and request help from outside experts.
  • An Observation Field indicating the observation contains microscope photos - this is uncommon but I think would be useful.
  • "Holding bins" to help sort easily-confused or similar-looking taxa (like many Clubionidae/Cheiracanthidae/Anyphaenidae) for later review

    Joe Lapp did some initial work on this while he was more active on iNat (I think he stepped back partly because of the stuff I'm hoping to improve)
  • Observation fields or some other way to tag things like egg sacs/webs/spiderlings for further review, but get them out of Needs-ID
  • Some easy way to tag-team other IDers on observations that need more people to correct the community ID

    A common example is: Computer Vision said *Oecobius* (it's not), some other person agreed, so now we need 4 votes to fix it. This could take years to happen naturally, especially on older observations.

I ran some quick numbers while I was working and found that almost 40% of the total observations in iNat's history (Spiders / Texas) were made in 2020. Almost 40,000 observations, just spiders, just Texas. For USA it was well over 40%. Over 2/3 of all US spider observations (400,000+) are Needs-ID. I expect iNat will continue to grow at a steady pace, or at least I don't see any reason why its popularity would suddenly fall off. This is awesome, but is overwhelming for the limited number of volunteers we have to try and sort through everything. So that's pretty much it - I am looking at this as a way to make Spider-IDing-on-iNat better for us, without upsetting observers or obscuring any potentially-interesting observations. I welcome anyone's thoughts. I chose a journal entry because many people are not active on the iNat forum and this seemed the best way to involve everyone who might have input. It might not be the best forum for an active conversation but we'll see.

I did save a bunch of representative examples of things I would or wouldn't treat as "unidentifiable" for various reasons, but I didn't include it here because I didn't want this to seem like a call-out post - more a group problem solving thing. But if there is interest I can include some examples. I have had this basic conversation with several people individually so I thought a sort of group discussion might be productive.

Thanks for reading (sorry for the wall of words) and any opinions you would like to share about this, and thanks for the work you do to make iNat so awesome!

-Justin

Posted on January 22, 2021 08:33 by jgw_atx jgw_atx | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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wanda

hi

Posted on January 22, 2021 05:06 by susanpenn susanpenn | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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A Window of Opportunity - Sustainability Grant received!

January 2021 - Lilly Branch Audubon Society received funding to retrofit the Ecology building at UGA with bird-friendly window treatments. The transparency and reflectance of windows can prevent birds from perceiving them as barriers, leading many birds to crash into the glass mid-flight. Colliding with windows can stun, injure, or kill birds. Fortunately, window treatments that help birds recognize windows as barriers have proven effective in reducing the number of bird-window collisions.
With this pilot project, we aim to:

  1. Educate UGA and Athens community members about the problem of bird-window collisions
  2. Develop a procedure for retrofitting existing buildings with bird-friendly film
  3. Assess the success of the window treatments (compare spring 2021 bird strikes at the Ecology building to strikes at buildings of similar size and window area)
  4. Prioritize other UGA buildings for future window treatments

All observations submitted to this iNaturalist project will help us with aims 3 and 4!

To learn more about bird-friendly window treatments, visit

Thank you!

Posted on January 22, 2021 03:31 by isabellaragonese isabellaragonese | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Species Highlight - Celtis laevigata (hackberry or sugarberry)

As part of our January Ecoquest Digging Deeper we wanted to highlight one of the sweetest plants in Florida, the Sugarberry!

By Elizabeth Gandy, Curatorial Assistant

Celtis laevigata, commonly known as hackberry or sugarberry, is an easily overlooked small to large tree found in wet to mesic hammocks throughout Florida and much of the United States (Image 1). With an affinity for calcareous or high pH soils, sugarberry can also be found on aboriginal shell mounds. The discerning plant hunter can easily learn to identify these trees. One of the first things that often draws the eye is the bark. When the trees are young, the bark is covered in longitudinal corky protrusions that superficially remind one of a winged elm. With age, the ridges break up and turn into knobby protrusions (Image 2). No other tree in the Sarasota-Manatee area has bark that is quite this furrowed or knobby.
Sugarberry leaves are pointed at the tips, smooth on the edges, sometimes a little rough on the surface, and most distinctly, asymmetrical at the base. The leaves are deciduous, turning yellow before dropping in early winter. Flowers are small and lack petals, with separate male and female flowers found on the same tree. Three additional species of Celtis are found in Florida, the more northern common hackberry, C. occidentalis is found in drier forests, and the endangered spiny and iguana hackberries, C. pallida and C. iguanaea, respectively, are rare, but can found growing on shell mounds.

Sugarberry is one of the plants in this month’s Digging Deeper EcoQuest because of its importance to Florida’s native peoples. Our understanding of its uses comes from recent historical accounts, ethnobotanical knowledge of present day native peoples, and archaeobotanical findings from aboriginal shell mound studies.
As a member of the Cannabaceae, or hemp family, it is not surprising that the genus Celtis has been used medicinally throughout its range. The wood is useful for building as well as fuel. One of the most widely used parts is the fruit, a one-seeded drupe (think tiny peach), turning yellow to reddish at maturity. The tasty flesh is the source of the common name of sugarberry (Celtis laevigata) as it is thought to be sweeter than the fruit of common hackberry (Celtis occidentalis). Eaten fresh, turned into jelly, or macerated and mixed with other ingredients, the fruit of the sugarberry was an important food source for native peoples. Archaeobotanical studies have found fruit and wood in undisturbed layers of archaic shell mounds in southwest Florida, providing important evidence of what resources native peoples used.

For plant hunters looking to find sugarberry for this month’s EcoQuest, some good locations include Marie Selby Botanical Gardens Historic Spanish Point campus, Oscar Scherer State Park, Circus Hammock, Terra Ceia Preserve State Park, Emerson Point Preserve, Madira Bickel Mound State Park, and Little Manatee River State Park to name a few. It is also cultivated at the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens downtown campus. Keep your eyes out for sugarberry and all the other plants in this month’s EcoQuest, Digging Deeper, wherever your plant hunting takes you!

Posted on January 22, 2021 02:55 by sarasota_manatee_ecoflora_sean sarasota_manatee_ecoflora_sean | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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January 21, 2021 (Thursday): South Side

January 21, 2021 (Thursday): 7:45 am - 9:30 am
Coverage: Aldercroft Road to stop sign.
9 dead newts, none fresh. One was a juvenile.
Other roadkill: None
Pit Traps: Empty
Weather: Sunny, started at 48 degrees F, no precipitation (maybe tomorrow though)
Traffic: 12 vehicles, no pedestrians.
Garbage: Picked up a bag of lead fishing weights out of habit; I do the same thing along our coastline.

Posted on January 22, 2021 02:33 by anudibranchmom anudibranchmom | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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FungiSight is ready for your observations!

Welcome to FungiSight on iNaturalist!

Thanks to Tony at iNaturalist's help team, we've resolved the issue with our species list and are ready to go! You can now add observations of any species of our target genera (see our project list) to the FungiSight project.

My name is Grace, I'm a PhD candidate at the University of Melbourne. I study Agaricus- and I am particularly keen to find out what species of Agaricus we have here in Australia and across the ditch in good old NZ. We have a lot of undescribed native species and for my PhD, I'm hoping to identify as many of them as I can, name some and work out how our Australasian Agaricus fit in with the rest of the world's.

I started FungiSight on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/fungisight) when I was doing my Master's degree - back before iNaturalist was available to us in Australia. I needed to collect fresh fungi for my research but it's so hard to know when and where they were fruiting. I needed eyes on the ground telling me when and where they were popping up so I could go collect them. And you all rose to the challenge magnificently! Thanks to you, I was able to collect enough fresh Agaricus xanthodermus to do my research- and I'm now in the process of publishing our results on A. xanthodermus toxicity.

Now iNaturalist is here and I would LOVE your Australian Agaricus observations! We've even extended the FungiSight family to include research projects for some fellow mycologists: my supervisor, Teresa (Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium of South Australia), my Phd "sister" Fran Guard in QLD, and fungal ecologist Sapphire. We're also keeping an eye on the spread of some Amanita species.

I'll keep you posted with our research and I look forward to seeing any observations you can share with us!
Cheers,
Grace

Posted on January 22, 2021 00:15 by agboxshall agboxshall | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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7. Kenmerken(Annotaties) toevoegen aan Waarnemingen dmv Identity

Als je toch iets nuttigs wilt doen en niet te veel wilt nadenken kun je Kenmerken als "in knop", "bloeiend", geslacht, larve, imago toevoegen aan fotos .

If enough observations of a taxon are annotated, we can start to get some cool data on them, eg for Monarchs 11 (although look at how many still need a life stage annotation!):

On the Identify page, here are the basic settings I’ll use choose for life stage annotations:

The URL for this is: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/identify?quality_grade=needs_id%2Cresearch&order_by=random&without_term_id=1&captive=false 35

This should show me all Needs ID and RG observations lacking a life stage annotation, sorted randomly.

I’ll choose a taxon compatible with life stage, for example Lepidoptera.

Then, when I click on the first observation, I’ll make sure to go to the Annotations tab. There is a handy list of keyboard commands on the bottom left-hand corner.

It’s pretty easy to rapidly go through the observations and tell which ones are of eggs, larvae, pupae, or adults and add annotations for those.
Things to remember:

If you are unsure, it’s better to not add the annotation, feel free to move on to the next observation.

Don’t go too quickly, sometimes you’ll add the wrong annotation! Be sure to correct any errors you make

Some taxa can be tricky. For example, there are larviform female 5 adult beetles and other insects, which are difficult to distinguish from adults. Again, if you’re unsure, don’t add an annotation.

That’s about it!



https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/21170-adding-photos-to-journal-and-news-posts
https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/using-identify-to-annotate-observations/1417

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/using-identify-to-annotate-observations/1417

  1. Kenmerken(Annotaties) toevoegen aan Waarnemingen dmv Identity

I've tried to review my own observations, but failed untill I set "Reviewed" to "Any". May be it will be helpfull for someone.

https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/ahospers/43230-20-eol-took-291-000-common-names-in-279-languages-from-wikidata

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/mossen-rond-het-mec-de-bryoflora-van-park-oudegein-en-een-deel-van-het-ijsselbos-te-nieuwegein/journal/45729-atlas-paddenstoelen-drenthe

Posted on January 21, 2021 23:09 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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7. Kenmerken(Annotaties) toevoegen aan Waarnemingen dmv Identity

Als je toch iets nuttigs wilt doen en niet te veel wilt nadenken kun je Kenmerken als "in knop", "bloeiend", geslacht, larve, imago toevoegen aan fotos .

If enough observations of a taxon are annotated, we can start to get some cool data on them, eg for Monarchs 11 (although look at how many still need a life stage annotation!):

On the Identify page, here are the basic settings I’ll use choose for life stage annotations:

The URL for this is: https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/identify?quality_grade=needs_id%2Cresearch&order_by=random&without_term_id=1&captive=false 35

This should show me all Needs ID and RG observations lacking a life stage annotation, sorted randomly.

I’ll choose a taxon compatible with life stage, for example Lepidoptera.

Then, when I click on the first observation, I’ll make sure to go to the Annotations tab. There is a handy list of keyboard commands on the bottom left-hand corner.

It’s pretty easy to rapidly go through the observations and tell which ones are of eggs, larvae, pupae, or adults and add annotations for those.
Things to remember:

If you are unsure, it’s better to not add the annotation, feel free to move on to the next observation.

Don’t go too quickly, sometimes you’ll add the wrong annotation! Be sure to correct any errors you make

Some taxa can be tricky. For example, there are larviform female 5 adult beetles and other insects, which are difficult to distinguish from adults. Again, if you’re unsure, don’t add an annotation.

That’s about it!



https://www.inaturalist.org/posts/21170-adding-photos-to-journal-and-news-posts
https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/using-identify-to-annotate-observations/1417

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/using-identify-to-annotate-observations/1417

  1. Kenmerken(Annotaties) toevoegen aan Waarnemingen dmv Identity

I've tried to review my own observations, but failed untill I set "Reviewed" to "Any". May be it will be helpfull for someone.

https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/ahospers/43230-20-eol-took-291-000-common-names-in-279-languages-from-wikidata

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/mossen-rond-het-mec-de-bryoflora-van-park-oudegein-en-een-deel-van-het-ijsselbos-te-nieuwegein/journal/45729-atlas-paddenstoelen-drenthe

Posted on January 21, 2021 23:09 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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8b. 3000.000 soorten waargenomen op iNaturalist

Op de hoofdpagina, Blog pagina van iNaturalist verscheen net vandaag een leuk stuk over de 300.000 soorten dat op iNaturalist.org doorgegeven is terwijl er in de wereld 2 miljoen soorten in totaal zijn. 80% is dus nog niet gezien door de deelnemers. We zien dat insecten en planten de grootste bijdrage leveren maar dat dit ook de soortenrijkste groepen zijn. In de grafieken beneden stelt elk vierkantje 1.000 soorten voor.

https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/42626-we-passed-300-000-species-observed-on-inaturalist

It’s interesting to compare this number with the total numbers of species that we think are out there. Most agree that there are around 2 million species with names and that many more species exist that haven’t yet been named. We use IUCN’s numbers from 2010 which tally 1,740,330 species of plants, animals and fungi. Using this denominator, iNaturalist has now censused about 17% of all named species.

The figure below shows this split out by taxonomic category. Each square represents 1,000 species. There are 1,740 total squares and 300 green squares representing the subset observed on iNaturalist.

Most of the species on iNaturalist represent plants and insects but these are also the most speciose groups. In fact, even though the same number of plant and insect species have been observed on iNaturalist (roughly 100,000 each), this represents a much smaller fraction of the total insect diversity (11%) versus the total plant diversity (33%).

The group with the smallest percentage of species observed was Arachnids (8%) and the four terrestrial vertebrate groups (birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals) were the only groups with greater than 50% observed. The denominators are probably underestimated as new species have been described since these IUCN numbers were released in 2010, but these percentages are likely not too far off.

In addition to thinking about how many species we’ve observed on iNaturalist, it’s interesting to consider how quickly we’re accumulating new species. The graphs below show the numbers of species observed on iNaturalist over time. The graph on the left is for North American Birds and the graph on the right is for South American Fish. For North American Birds, we do seem to be reaching a plateau (i.e. we've running out of missing species). In fact, over the last 12 months we’ve averaged 19,696 North American Bird observations for each new species tallied. In contrast, for South American Fish the number of species does not seem to be plateauing at all. Over the last 12 months we’ve tallied a new species for every 14 observations of South American Fish added on average.

Here’s the species groups and continents (e.g. South American Fish) where we’ve averaged fewer than 100 observations to tally a new species sorted by this obs/sp stat. Underrepresented groups like fishes and mollusks are over represented in this subset as are continents like South America and Africa.

These are the species groups and continents where we’ve averaged more than 100 and fewer than 1,000 observations to tally a new species.

Lastly, these are the species groups and continents where we’re averaging over 1,000 observations to log a new species. Here, North America and Europe dominate alongside over represented groups like birds and other terrestrial vertebrates.

To tally a new species on iNaturalist, several things have to happen: we need observations from that taxonomic group and location to be posted, the images must reveal enough detail for the species to be identified, and someone with the skills, time, and interest needs to provide an identification. There are steps you can do at each point in this process to increase the overall rate.

To generate more observations, spend some time observing taxa in places you don’t normally visit. If you focus mainly on terrestrial vertebrates, try observing some fish and invertebrates. Invest in some gear to attract or capture creatures you don’t normally encounter like a moth light or aquatic sampling gear or a macro lens for your phone. Try to get others observing by organizing a bioblitz.

To increase the probability your observations will be identified, do your best to take identifiable photos. If you are an identifier specializing in a certain group, write a journal post to encourage people to pay attention to the characters you know are important. Also, engage with observers. Often they can relocate the critter and take photos of the characters you want as in this exchange between @agapakisnikos and @naufalurfi:

https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/42626-we-passed-300-000-species-observed-on-inaturalist

8b. 3000.000 soorten waargenomen op iNaturalist

https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/ahospers/43230-20-eol-took-291-000-common-names-in-279-languages-from-wikidata

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/mossen-rond-het-mec-de-bryoflora-van-park-oudegein-en-een-deel-van-het-ijsselbos-te-nieuwegein/journal/45729-atlas-paddenstoelen-drenthe

Posted on January 21, 2021 23:08 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
87881 icon thumb

8b. 3000.000 soorten waargenomen op iNaturalist

Op de hoofdpagina, Blog pagina van iNaturalist verscheen net vandaag een leuk stuk over de 300.000 soorten dat op iNaturalist.org doorgegeven is terwijl er in de wereld 2 miljoen soorten in totaal zijn. 80% is dus nog niet gezien door de deelnemers. We zien dat insecten en planten de grootste bijdrage leveren maar dat dit ook de soortenrijkste groepen zijn. In de grafieken beneden stelt elk vierkantje 1.000 soorten voor.

https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/42626-we-passed-300-000-species-observed-on-inaturalist

It’s interesting to compare this number with the total numbers of species that we think are out there. Most agree that there are around 2 million species with names and that many more species exist that haven’t yet been named. We use IUCN’s numbers from 2010 which tally 1,740,330 species of plants, animals and fungi. Using this denominator, iNaturalist has now censused about 17% of all named species.

The figure below shows this split out by taxonomic category. Each square represents 1,000 species. There are 1,740 total squares and 300 green squares representing the subset observed on iNaturalist.

Most of the species on iNaturalist represent plants and insects but these are also the most speciose groups. In fact, even though the same number of plant and insect species have been observed on iNaturalist (roughly 100,000 each), this represents a much smaller fraction of the total insect diversity (11%) versus the total plant diversity (33%).

The group with the smallest percentage of species observed was Arachnids (8%) and the four terrestrial vertebrate groups (birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals) were the only groups with greater than 50% observed. The denominators are probably underestimated as new species have been described since these IUCN numbers were released in 2010, but these percentages are likely not too far off.

In addition to thinking about how many species we’ve observed on iNaturalist, it’s interesting to consider how quickly we’re accumulating new species. The graphs below show the numbers of species observed on iNaturalist over time. The graph on the left is for North American Birds and the graph on the right is for South American Fish. For North American Birds, we do seem to be reaching a plateau (i.e. we've running out of missing species). In fact, over the last 12 months we’ve averaged 19,696 North American Bird observations for each new species tallied. In contrast, for South American Fish the number of species does not seem to be plateauing at all. Over the last 12 months we’ve tallied a new species for every 14 observations of South American Fish added on average.

Here’s the species groups and continents (e.g. South American Fish) where we’ve averaged fewer than 100 observations to tally a new species sorted by this obs/sp stat. Underrepresented groups like fishes and mollusks are over represented in this subset as are continents like South America and Africa.

These are the species groups and continents where we’ve averaged more than 100 and fewer than 1,000 observations to tally a new species.

Lastly, these are the species groups and continents where we’re averaging over 1,000 observations to log a new species. Here, North America and Europe dominate alongside over represented groups like birds and other terrestrial vertebrates.

To tally a new species on iNaturalist, several things have to happen: we need observations from that taxonomic group and location to be posted, the images must reveal enough detail for the species to be identified, and someone with the skills, time, and interest needs to provide an identification. There are steps you can do at each point in this process to increase the overall rate.

To generate more observations, spend some time observing taxa in places you don’t normally visit. If you focus mainly on terrestrial vertebrates, try observing some fish and invertebrates. Invest in some gear to attract or capture creatures you don’t normally encounter like a moth light or aquatic sampling gear or a macro lens for your phone. Try to get others observing by organizing a bioblitz.

To increase the probability your observations will be identified, do your best to take identifiable photos. If you are an identifier specializing in a certain group, write a journal post to encourage people to pay attention to the characters you know are important. Also, engage with observers. Often they can relocate the critter and take photos of the characters you want as in this exchange between @agapakisnikos and @naufalurfi:

https://www.inaturalist.org/blog/42626-we-passed-300-000-species-observed-on-inaturalist

8b. 3000.000 soorten waargenomen op iNaturalist

https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/ahospers/43230-20-eol-took-291-000-common-names-in-279-languages-from-wikidata

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/mossen-rond-het-mec-de-bryoflora-van-park-oudegein-en-een-deel-van-het-ijsselbos-te-nieuwegein/journal/45729-atlas-paddenstoelen-drenthe

Posted on January 21, 2021 23:07 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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22. Afkortingen gebruiken in iNaturalist “suggest an ID” bar accepts partial names

For those of you who may not know, the “suggest an ID” bar accepts partial names, by producing a list of “closest matches”. Thus, eup mac becomes Euphorbia maculata, mall becomes Anas platyrhynchos (ie Mallard), and so on.

I started a spreadsheet of shortcuts! Specifically, short ones, one to three letters or maybe four.

Thought it might be a useful resource for anyone who does a lot of IDs, especially if you’re doing coarse identifications. Maybe you’ll find a neat shortcut you wouldn’t have thought of. There are some weird surprises in there (q q = Chelicerata??).
Please help me fill it in. As it gets longer and more complete, it’ll be more useful.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1V5II3NaULAmVqdYWh5DTm2rASvcPQgcgvXTcyYjBrkM/edit?usp=sharing 11

nor moc = northern mockingbird, bla pho = black Phoebe, cal scr = California scrub jay, ocr sea = ochre sea star, pac pur = pacific purple sea urchin, etc.
there were a shorter way to fill in the ‘Euphorbia’ species that I’m constantly typing”. Then memorize a relevant listed string for use, or contribute one if you figure out a good shortcut. Sounds handy, great

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/inat-id-shortcut-list/17572

  1. Afkortingen gebruiken in iNaturalist “suggest an ID” bar accepts partial names

https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/ahospers/43230-20-eol-took-291-000-common-names-in-279-languages-from-wikidata

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/mossen-rond-het-mec-de-bryoflora-van-park-oudegein-en-een-deel-van-het-ijsselbos-te-nieuwegein/journal/45729-atlas-paddenstoelen-drenthe

Posted on January 21, 2021 23:02 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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22. Afkortingen gebruiken in iNaturalist “suggest an ID” bar accepts partial names

For those of you who may not know, the “suggest an ID” bar accepts partial names, by producing a list of “closest matches”. Thus, eup mac becomes Euphorbia maculata, mall becomes Anas platyrhynchos (ie Mallard), and so on.

I started a spreadsheet of shortcuts! Specifically, short ones, one to three letters or maybe four.

Thought it might be a useful resource for anyone who does a lot of IDs, especially if you’re doing coarse identifications. Maybe you’ll find a neat shortcut you wouldn’t have thought of. There are some weird surprises in there (q q = Chelicerata??).
Please help me fill it in. As it gets longer and more complete, it’ll be more useful.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1V5II3NaULAmVqdYWh5DTm2rASvcPQgcgvXTcyYjBrkM/edit?usp=sharing 11

nor moc = northern mockingbird, bla pho = black Phoebe, cal scr = California scrub jay, ocr sea = ochre sea star, pac pur = pacific purple sea urchin, etc.
there were a shorter way to fill in the ‘Euphorbia’ species that I’m constantly typing”. Then memorize a relevant listed string for use, or contribute one if you figure out a good shortcut. Sounds handy, great

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/inat-id-shortcut-list/17572

  1. Afkortingen gebruiken in iNaturalist “suggest an ID” bar accepts partial names

https://www.inaturalist.org/journal/ahospers/43230-20-eol-took-291-000-common-names-in-279-languages-from-wikidata

https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/mossen-rond-het-mec-de-bryoflora-van-park-oudegein-en-een-deel-van-het-ijsselbos-te-nieuwegein/journal/45729-atlas-paddenstoelen-drenthe

Posted on January 21, 2021 23:02 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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25. iOS 14 heeft een snelle multi-photo selection optie intern ingebouwd, en dit is een veel gevraagde eigenschap

iNaturalist app stapt over naar iOS 14 en deze iphone app heeft een snelle en goede multi foto select app, een gewaardeerde feature.
Voor iOS onder versie 14 (pre-iOS 14) is een third party library photo picker gebruikt en die lijkt nogal langzaam te zijn bij grote hoeveelheden fotos en dat is niet eenvoudig te veranderen.

De met iOS 14 meegeleverde native photo picker that is erg snel als je dat graag wilt is een upgrade tot iOS14 verstandig om multiple photos goed te kunnen gebruiken. iOS 14 heeft ook verbeterde security en deel
mogeljikheden over je fotos

Met vresie 3.0.6 wordt de iNat iPhone app volledig herschreven en om die reden ook gefaseerd uitgerold naar de Apple store. Dit bleek terecht want erwaren nogal wat crashes in het begin en ook de conversie kon soms lang duren.

Verschillende gebruikers vinden upload via de iPhone handiger en sneller dan via de PC omdat het opzoeken van een locatie op de PC enorm veel tijd kost. En dat is idd niet zo handig.

Tot November 2019 werd RestKit gebruikt op 3 plekken in de iOS app :guides, projects, and observations.
In November werden de gidsen uit iNat iOS gehaald.
In Januari 2020 kwam iNat 2.8.7 waarbij de Project tab weg was en de maanden er na zouden
de observations overgezet worden vanuti Reskit en Voorjaar 2020 worden de third party Swift libaries toegevoegd waarbij de eerste actie het gebruik van de third pary libary voor multi photo selection zal zijn.




























Tijdperk, Periode Betrokken Librarie Geraakte onderdelen
Tot November 2019 Alleen RestKit Library Library Aanwezig in Guides, Projecten en Waarnemingen.
November 2019 Alleen RestKit Library Gidsen overgezet naar Swift
Januari 2020 Van Reskit naar Swift iNat 2.8.7, Project Overgezet naar Swift
Maart2020 Van Reskit naar Swift iNat 2.8.7, Project Overgezet naar Swift

Multi-photo upload by Web


https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/getting+started#web
https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/video+tutorials#add_web

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/multiple-images-selection-in-gallery-disabled-in-latest-update-and-photo-metadata-not-being-read/7519/56

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/multiple-images-selection-in-gallery-disabled-in-latest-update-and-photo-metadata-not-being-read/7519/55

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/multiple-images-selection-in-gallery-disabled-in-latest-update-and-photo-metadata-not-being-read/7519/41?u=ahospers

Vlaggen van een Taxon

Als je vragen hebt over een Taxon kun je een Vlag zetten op de pagina. Zie dit plaatje
Flag voor Curation, Edit Foto's of  Create atlas

Links, Referenties, Literature

https://kildor.name/react/inat-converter/Met Google translate kun je ook statistisch journaal posts maken. er is een tool voor die de noodzakelijke alineas (page breaks) toevoegt, origineel is het gebruikt om statische to Flora of Russia projectte schrijven en zet ook wat statistieken om in HTML .

https://forum.waarneming.nl/index.php/topic,475127.0.html

https://forum.waarneming.nl/index.php/topic,460800.msg2428973.html#msg2428973

  1. iOS 14 heeft een snelle multi-photo selection optie intern ingebouwd, en dit is een veel gevraagde eigenschap

https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/share-observations-between-users/337/ and https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/add-interactions-to-species-pages/433/ respectively

https://forum.waarneming.nl/index.php/topic,460800.msg2428973.html#msg2428973 Gaat op de iPhone de fotokiezer van ObsIdentify ge-update worden?

Er is -- als ik het goed begrepen heb -- een nieuwe native fotokiezer in iOS 14 die onder andere een zoekveld ondersteund tijdens het selecteren van foto's uit de fotogalerij. Ook zijn de prestaties beter bij het laden/browsen van albums in iCloud. Daarnaast is er ook ondersteuning voor het bladeren van BESTANDEN ipv allen de FOTOKIEZER, op die manier kunnen ook bestanden uit een map geladen worden ipv alleen uit de fotogalerij.

Als ik de website gebruik zijn deze mogelijkheden er wel (screenshots):

oelichting
Ik ervaar hinderlijk slechte prestaties van de huidige fotokiezer in ObsIdentify (met een iPhone XR), zoals ik hier heb gemeld (maar geen reactie op heb ontvangen).
Ik neig er daarom naar om de website te gebruiken, maar die is dan regelmatig weer niet in staat om GPS gegevens aan de foto's te ontfutselen, terwijl ObsIdentify dat met dezelfde foto's wel lukt.

https://forum.waarneming.nl/index.php/topic,475127.0.html

to’s uit de fotobibliotheek ronduit belabberd.
Ik moet daarbij melden dat ik grootgebruiker ben van iCloud wat betreft fotoopslag.

Wat er gebeurd als ik in ObsIdentify op het gallerij icoon druk is, dat er lang niets gebeurd en vervolgens een lijst verschijnt van mijn fotoalbums. Bovenaan staat ‘Recent’. Meestal is dat waar ik moet zijn dus dan gaat het prima.
Zoek ik echter een eigen album dat een paar schermen scroller lager staat blijkt er echter een enorm prestatieprobleem te zijn. Het scrollen van de albumlijst is traag als dikke stroop. Het lijkt alsof er ter plekke op de achtergrond een cache gemaakt wordt van alle albums ofzo. Uiteindelijk lukt het me om bij betreffend album te komen en kan ik binnen het album met redelijk normale prestaties door de foto’s bladeren en er 1 selecteren.
Dan kan ik verder en als ik een slechte match heb, mag ik nog meer foto’s toevoegen. Enfin, hetzelde liedje, maar dit keer toch iets minder stroperig, doch verre van ideaal.

Gebruik ik gewoon de website via Safari heb ik dit probleem niet, ben ik in 4 seconde klaar met 4 foto’s erin knallen en hoppakee daar staat de match al op het scherm.

Nu begreep ik dat in iOS 14 een nieuwe bestanden/foto-blader module is geïntroduceerd (met ingebouwde search/filter bar). Safari gebruikt deze dan ook en ging super snel. ObsIdentify benut dit niet vanzelf na de systeemupdate en is nu een soort kreupel oudje geworden op mijn toestel.

k wil graag het volgende eens aankaarten: Sinds ik mijn iPhone (XR) heb geupdate naar iOS 14.0 zijn de prestaties bij het laden van foto’s uit de fotobibliotheek ronduit belabberd.
Ik moet daarbij melden dat ik grootgebruiker ben van iCloud wat betreft fotoopslag.

Wat er gebeurd als ik in ObsIdentify op het gallerij icoon druk is, dat er lang niets gebeurd en vervolgens een lijst verschijnt van mijn fotoalbums. Bovenaan staat ‘Recent’. Meestal is dat waar ik moet zijn dus dan gaat het prima.
Zoek ik echter een eigen album dat een paar schermen scroller lager staat blijkt er echter een enorm prestatieprobleem te zijn. Het scrollen van de albumlijst is traag als dikke stroop. Het lijkt alsof er ter plekke op de achtergrond een cache gemaakt wordt van alle albums ofzo. Uiteindelijk lukt het me om bij betreffend album te komen en kan ik binnen het album met redelijk normale prestaties door de foto’s bladeren en er 1 selecteren.
Dan kan ik verder en als ik een slechte match heb, mag ik nog meer foto’s toevoegen. Enfin, hetzelde liedje, maar dit keer toch iets minder stroperig, doch verre van ideaal.

Gebruik ik gewoon de website via Safari heb ik dit probleem niet, ben ik in 4 seconde klaar met 4 foto’s erin knallen en hoppakee daar staat de match al op het scherm.

Nu begreep ik dat in iOS 14 een nieuwe bestanden/foto-blader module is geïntroduceerd (met ingebouwde search/filter bar). Safari gebruikt deze dan ook en ging super snel. ObsIdentify benut dit niet vanzelf na de systeemupdate en is nu een soort kreupel oudje geworden op mijn toestel.

Is dit bekend bij anderen?
Gaan we uiteindelijk over naar ‘de nieuwe bladermodule’?

  1. iOS 14 heeft een snelle multi-photo selection optie intern ingebouwd, en dit is een veel gevraagde eigenschap

Posted on January 21, 2021 22:59 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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25. iOS 14 heeft een snelle multi-photo selection optie intern ingebouwd, en dit is een veel gevraagde eigenschap

iNaturalist app stapt over naar iOS 14 en deze iphone app heeft een snelle en goede multi foto select app, een gewaardeerde feature. Voor iOS onder versie 14 (pre-iOS 14) is een third party library photo picker gebruikt en die lijkt nogal langzaam te zijn bij grote hoeveelheden fotos en dat is niet eenvoudig te veranderen. De met iOS 14 meegeleverde native photo picker that is erg snel als je dat graag wilt is een upgrade tot iOS14 verstandig om multiple photos goed te kunnen gebruiken. iOS 14 heeft ook verbeterde security en deel mogeljikheden over je fotos Met vresie 3.0.6 wordt de iNat iPhone app volledig herschreven en om die reden ook gefaseerd uitgerold naar de Apple store. Dit bleek terecht want erwaren nogal wat crashes in het begin en ook de conversie kon soms lang duren. Verschillende gebruikers vinden upload via de iPhone handiger en sneller dan via de PC omdat het opzoeken van een locatie op de PC enorm veel tijd kost. En dat is idd niet zo handig. Tot November 2019 werd RestKit gebruikt op 3 plekken in de iOS app :guides, projects, and observations. In November werden de gidsen uit iNat iOS gehaald. In Januari 2020 kwam iNat 2.8.7 waarbij de Project tab weg was en de maanden er na zouden de observations overgezet worden vanuti Reskit en Voorjaar 2020 worden de third party Swift libaries toegevoegd waarbij de eerste actie het gebruik van de third pary libary voor multi photo selection zal zijn.

Tijdperk, Periode Betrokken Librarie Geraakte onderdelen
Tot November 2019 Alleen RestKit Library Library Aanwezig in Guides, Projecten en Waarnemingen.
November 2019 Alleen RestKit Library Gidsen overgezet naar Swift
Januari 2020 Van Reskit naar Swift iNat 2.8.7, Project Overgezet naar Swift
Maart2020 Van Reskit naar Swift iNat 2.8.7, Project Overgezet naar Swift

Multi-photo upload by Web

https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/getting+started#web https://www.inaturalist.org/pages/video+tutorials#add_web https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/multiple-images-selection-in-gallery-disabled-in-latest-update-and-photo-metadata-not-being-read/7519/56 https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/multiple-images-selection-in-gallery-disabled-in-latest-update-and-photo-metadata-not-being-read/7519/55 https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/multiple-images-selection-in-gallery-disabled-in-latest-update-and-photo-metadata-not-being-read/7519/41?u=ahospers

Vlaggen van een Taxon

Als je vragen hebt over een Taxon kun je een Vlag zetten op de pagina. Zie dit plaatje Flag voor Curation, Edit Foto's of  Create atlas

Links, Referenties, Literature

https://kildor.name/react/inat-converter/Met Google translate kun je ook statistisch journaal posts maken. er is een tool voor die de noodzakelijke alineas (page breaks) toevoegt, origineel is het gebruikt om statische to Flora of Russia projectte schrijven en zet ook wat statistieken om in HTML . https://forum.waarneming.nl/index.php/topic,475127.0.html https://forum.waarneming.nl/index.php/topic,460800.msg2428973.html#msg2428973 25. iOS 14 heeft een snelle multi-photo selection optie intern ingebouwd, en dit is een veel gevraagde eigenschap https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/share-observations-between-users/337/ and https://forum.inaturalist.org/t/add-interactions-to-species-pages/433/ respectively https://forum.waarneming.nl/index.php/topic,460800.msg2428973.html#msg2428973 Gaat op de iPhone de fotokiezer van ObsIdentify ge-update worden? Er is -- als ik het goed begrepen heb -- een nieuwe native fotokiezer in iOS 14 die onder andere een zoekveld ondersteund tijdens het selecteren van foto's uit de fotogalerij. Ook zijn de prestaties beter bij het laden/browsen van albums in iCloud. Daarnaast is er ook ondersteuning voor het bladeren van BESTANDEN ipv allen de FOTOKIEZER, op die manier kunnen ook bestanden uit een map geladen worden ipv alleen uit de fotogalerij. Als ik de website gebruik zijn deze mogelijkheden er wel (screenshots): oelichting Ik ervaar hinderlijk slechte prestaties van de huidige fotokiezer in ObsIdentify (met een iPhone XR), zoals ik hier heb gemeld (maar geen reactie op heb ontvangen). Ik neig er daarom naar om de website te gebruiken, maar die is dan regelmatig weer niet in staat om GPS gegevens aan de foto's te ontfutselen, terwijl ObsIdentify dat met dezelfde foto's wel lukt. https://forum.waarneming.nl/index.php/topic,475127.0.html to’s uit de fotobibliotheek ronduit belabberd. Ik moet daarbij melden dat ik grootgebruiker ben van iCloud wat betreft fotoopslag. Wat er gebeurd als ik in ObsIdentify op het gallerij icoon druk is, dat er lang niets gebeurd en vervolgens een lijst verschijnt van mijn fotoalbums. Bovenaan staat ‘Recent’. Meestal is dat waar ik moet zijn dus dan gaat het prima. Zoek ik echter een eigen album dat een paar schermen scroller lager staat blijkt er echter een enorm prestatieprobleem te zijn. Het scrollen van de albumlijst is traag als dikke stroop. Het lijkt alsof er ter plekke op de achtergrond een cache gemaakt wordt van alle albums ofzo. Uiteindelijk lukt het me om bij betreffend album te komen en kan ik binnen het album met redelijk normale prestaties door de foto’s bladeren en er 1 selecteren. Dan kan ik verder en als ik een slechte match heb, mag ik nog meer foto’s toevoegen. Enfin, hetzelde liedje, maar dit keer toch iets minder stroperig, doch verre van ideaal. Gebruik ik gewoon de website via Safari heb ik dit probleem niet, ben ik in 4 seconde klaar met 4 foto’s erin knallen en hoppakee daar staat de match al op het scherm. Nu begreep ik dat in iOS 14 een nieuwe bestanden/foto-blader module is geïntroduceerd (met ingebouwde search/filter bar). Safari gebruikt deze dan ook en ging super snel. ObsIdentify benut dit niet vanzelf na de systeemupdate en is nu een soort kreupel oudje geworden op mijn toestel. k wil graag het volgende eens aankaarten: Sinds ik mijn iPhone (XR) heb geupdate naar iOS 14.0 zijn de prestaties bij het laden van foto’s uit de fotobibliotheek ronduit belabberd. Ik moet daarbij melden dat ik grootgebruiker ben van iCloud wat betreft fotoopslag. Wat er gebeurd als ik in ObsIdentify op het gallerij icoon druk is, dat er lang niets gebeurd en vervolgens een lijst verschijnt van mijn fotoalbums. Bovenaan staat ‘Recent’. Meestal is dat waar ik moet zijn dus dan gaat het prima. Zoek ik echter een eigen album dat een paar schermen scroller lager staat blijkt er echter een enorm prestatieprobleem te zijn. Het scrollen van de albumlijst is traag als dikke stroop. Het lijkt alsof er ter plekke op de achtergrond een cache gemaakt wordt van alle albums ofzo. Uiteindelijk lukt het me om bij betreffend album te komen en kan ik binnen het album met redelijk normale prestaties door de foto’s bladeren en er 1 selecteren. Dan kan ik verder en als ik een slechte match heb, mag ik nog meer foto’s toevoegen. Enfin, hetzelde liedje, maar dit keer toch iets minder stroperig, doch verre van ideaal. Gebruik ik gewoon de website via Safari heb ik dit probleem niet, ben ik in 4 seconde klaar met 4 foto’s erin knallen en hoppakee daar staat de match al op het scherm. Nu begreep ik dat in iOS 14 een nieuwe bestanden/foto-blader module is geïntroduceerd (met ingebouwde search/filter bar). Safari gebruikt deze dan ook en ging super snel. ObsIdentify benut dit niet vanzelf na de systeemupdate en is nu een soort kreupel oudje geworden op mijn toestel. Is dit bekend bij anderen? Gaan we uiteindelijk over naar ‘de nieuwe bladermodule’? 25. iOS 14 heeft een snelle multi-photo selection optie intern ingebouwd, en dit is een veel gevraagde eigenschap
Posted on January 21, 2021 22:59 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Identification Stats and Targets for Improvement

As of today (Jan. 21, 2021) there are 345,955 mint observations in Continental US and Canada with 71.93% at research grade. That's pretty good!

Only 97,123 observations left to ID! That number may seem daunting, but it is truly manageable. Let's break down those observations into categories.

2.96% at family level
0.62% at subfamily level
1.69% at tribe/subtribe level
35.38% at genus level
59.35% at subgenus or lower

An undetermined percentage of these are as good as they can get, and they will be marked accordingly in due time. Many of these observations, however, just haven't been seen by IDers or perhaps the experts that have the necessary knowledge to bump observations down from genus to species or lower. Over the next year, I will be adding helpful URLs for taxa that need attention along with information necessary for IDers to make informed judgments about IDs. And once the Flora of North America publishes the Lamiaceae volume, we can make some serious progress.

In the meantime, if you're feeling ambitious and want to help out, here are a few things you can sink some time into:

  1. Mark cultivated plants as such to move them to "casual grade". Some commonly cultivated taxa are Salvia yangii, Nepeta spp (excluding Nepeta cataria), Plectranthus spp., Stachys byzantina, and a few others.
  2. ID some super common mints rapid fire. These include Prunella vulgaris, Lamium amplexicaule, Lamium purpureum, Glechoma hederacea, Clinopodium vulgare, Monarda fistulosa, Salvia lyrata", and *Marrubium vulgare. People tend to have a hard time with Prunella vulgaris, Lamium amplexicaule, Lamium purpureum, and Glechoma hederacea, so I will post a new key for those soon!
  3. Correct misidentifications associated with common name confusion. Main example: lamb's ear is the common name people tend to use for both Stachys byzantina and Verbascum thapsus.
  4. Expert IDs. If you're an expert with any mint taxa, iNat needs your help! Particularly with Stachys, Scutellaria, California Salvia, Monarda, Florida scrub mints, and Synandreae (especially in Texas). Ajugoideae in general needs a fair amount of work too.

Anyway, I hope you're excited about the prospect of iNat's community data. And I hope you're excited about North American mints! Or at least easily persuaded to be excited about a beautiful family of plants.

Posted on January 21, 2021 21:19 by alex_abair alex_abair | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Kozalak Rozeti

''Parmaklarım iğne gibi
Evim Anadolu'nun her köşe dibi
Meyvem umursamaz ne kış ne tipi
Yeşil rengin her dem sahibi''

Benim kim olduğumu düşünüp bulursanız 1 puan
Kendi çektiğiniz resmi paylaşırsanız 1 puan
Seek ve İnaturalist uygulamalarında paylaşırsanız 2 puan
Sosyal medyada beni etiketlerseniz 1 puan

Posted on January 21, 2021 21:11 by koy_kafasi koy_kafasi | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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iNaturalist annotations

The online version of iNaturalist includes a panel called ‘annotations’ where one can assign a number of attributes such as life stage and sex. If you are a tick expert, then please help select the correct entries.

For information describing annotations, what are they and why they are useful click here. This page also provides directions on how to use the iNat Identify tool and rapidly annotate many observations.

A third attribute is ‘alive or dead’. If you kill the tick shortly after sighting it that is fine – but record the attribute as ‘living’ as this was the case when the tick was initially observed!

Posted on January 21, 2021 21:02 by mkkennedy mkkennedy | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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How to share observations of ticks observed in situ (aka outdoors)

If you observe a tick when you are outdoors, and it is either on a plant or you are relatively confident that you or your companion (person or pet) picked it up in the immediate vicinity, then you should add this observation to iNaturalist as you would any other sighting of wildlife. If you recognize the species of tick, then choose that name from the list of suggested names. Enter the location and date of the sighting.

In the description or notes box enter extra info such as tick observed on a plant or on a pet or observed on a wild animal (rabbit). [eTick host type: free environment, on an animal, on a human]

If the tick is observed on an animal or human then you could also note if the tick was crawling or attached or engorged.

You should try to include something for scale in the photo.

Another option is to record all the info as described above but capture the tick and take it home where you can take better photos. The eTick group have created a great set of instructions and a video tutorial on how to photograph ticks. These instructions can easily be adapted to help you take good photos suitable for iNaturalist.

Stay safe - don't actively try to get bitten!

Posted on January 21, 2021 20:40 by mkkennedy mkkennedy | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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What is eTick?

Believe it or not iNaturalist is not the only citizen science program that encourages people to share photos of wildlife online. eTick is a Canadian citizen science platform for image-based identification and population monitoring. NOTE: eTick’s focus is solely on ticks found in Canada whereas iNat’s focus is any wildlife found anywhere around the world.

The eTick web page states ‘The emergence of Lyme disease and the rapid geographical range expansion of certain tick species in Canada are important issues for public health authorities and the public in general. Following tick populations on such a large territory is also expensive and logistically challenging.’ It is a simple fact that no one research group or government organization can properly monitor the presence of tick species everywhere across our vast country. To properly monitor the distribution of ticks will require collaboration between organizations and participation from locals.

The mobilization of iNatters to help collect observations of ticks while they are out and about exploring and connecting with nature could help fill gaps. Both iNat and eTick require date/time and location of the observation. In order for iNat observations to be ‘useful’ to the eTick research project the iNat observation should include notes about the host type (free environment, on an animal, on a human).

In a future journal post we will provide examples on how iNatters can share their tick photos with eTick. Stand by!

Posted on January 21, 2021 20:24 by mkkennedy mkkennedy | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Story #4

My sister has basically made up her mind to be a naturalist. One day I walked into her room and saw her working on her computer. I asked her what she was doing and she said looking at ADW, (A.K.A. Animal Diversity Web) a website. she said she was looking on it to try to identify a bird she saw. asked her what it looked like and she said it was completely black, or brown, or dark gray, except for it's belly which is white. we looked at many different bird species, and as we were looking through the list of names, we saw there was a type of bird called a Common Snipe, so now we know that in the movie Up, Mr. Fredrickson was wrong when he said there was no such thing as a Snipe. we found out later that the bird was a dark-eyed junco!

Sent by: @imladris

Posted on January 21, 2021 19:47 by myles678 myles678 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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