The Great Southern Bioblitz 2021 is days away!

Hello everyone,

The Great Southern Bioblitz is back for another year. After an amazing event in 2020 the Southern Hemisphere once again gets the opportunity for a large-scale BioBlitz during its Spring. This year's observation period will run from October 22nd-25th, the perfect time for birds, flowering plants, bugs and more.

Spring is the peak time for most species with plants flowering following the cool damp winter and before the heat of summer. It's also the time when most fauna species are active. Large areas of Australia have had a wet winter and early spring this year, so the conditions should be perfect for you to get out and explore your local area to discover what’s around. So, please get involved in this event.

The goal is for members of the community and visitors to the Wellington Shire to record as many species as possible during the event dates. Participants are encouraged to submit all observations of plants, animals, insects etc. and it doesn’t matter if they’re from conservation areas, parks or even your backyard. It all counts and will help to demonstrate the diversity of species that call the area home.

Anyone can participate in the Bioblitz, whether as an individual, a family or as a member of an organisation.

This project has been setup to bring together all of the amazing observations that residents / visitors to the Wellington Shire will take during the Bioblitz, and also as a way to see how how other members of this great community are going.

Follow the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 on social media
Facebook: GS Bioblitz
Twitter: GS Bioblitz
Instagram: GS Bioblitz

Contact us through social media or via greatsouthernbioblitz@gmail.com

Good luck to everyone.

@bushbandit @cheelii @colintrainor @daviaker @elapidwildlife @faye_vyner @hdavid @janeneate @jennyghct @kenharris @lesfreck @lorraine28 @mitchsmith @nikbaines @peterzuidland @ronigreer @stanley8m @sylvaker @tleitch @tricarpa @w_martin

Posted on October 17, 2021 02:18 by a_kurek a_kurek | 0 comments | Leave a comment

The Great Southern Bioblitz 2021 is days away!

Hello everyone,

The Great Southern Bioblitz is back for another year. After an amazing event in 2020 the Southern Hemisphere once again gets the opportunity for a large-scale BioBlitz during its Spring. This year's observation period will run from October 22nd-25th, the perfect time for birds, flowering plants, bugs and more.

Spring is the peak time for most species with plants flowering following the cool damp winter and before the heat of summer. It's also the time when most fauna species are active. Large areas of Australia have had a wet winter and early spring this year, so the conditions should be perfect for you to get out and explore your local area to discover what’s around. So, please get involved in this event.

The goal is for members of the community and visitors to the City of Port Philip to record as many species as possible during the event dates. Participants are encouraged to submit all observations of plants, animals, insects etc. and it doesn’t matter if they’re from conservation areas, parks or even your backyard. It all counts and will help to demonstrate the diversity of species that call the area home.

Anyone can participate in the Bioblitz, whether as an individual, a family or as a member of an organisation.

This project has been setup to bring together all of the amazing observations that residents / visitors to the City of Port Philip will take during the Bioblitz, and also as a way to see how how other members of this great community are going.

Follow the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 on social media
Facebook: GS Bioblitz
Twitter: GS Bioblitz
Instagram: GS Bioblitz

Contact us through social media or via greatsouthernbioblitz@gmail.com

Good luck to everyone.

@ecocentrestkilda @grace_sibley @jameskdouch @ronanryan @stanley8m @suzieandjim @tayloab

Posted on October 17, 2021 02:10 by a_kurek a_kurek | 0 comments | Leave a comment

The Great Southern Bioblitz 2021 is days away!

Hello everyone,

The Great Southern Bioblitz is back for another year. After an amazing event in 2020 the Southern Hemisphere once again gets the opportunity for a large-scale BioBlitz during its Spring. This year's observation period will run from October 22nd-25th, the perfect time for birds, flowering plants, bugs and more.

Spring is the peak time for most species with plants flowering following the cool damp winter and before the heat of summer. It's also the time when most fauna species are active. Large areas of Australia have had a wet winter and early spring this year, so the conditions should be perfect for you to get out and explore your local area to discover what’s around. So, please get involved in this event.

The goal is for members of the community and visitors to the City of Melbourne to record as many species as possible during the event dates. Participants are encouraged to submit all observations of plants, animals, insects etc. and it doesn’t matter if they’re from conservation areas, parks or even your backyard. It all counts and will help to demonstrate the diversity of species that call the area home.

Anyone can participate in the Bioblitz, whether as an individual, a family or as a member of an organisation.

This project has been setup to bring together all of the amazing observations that residents / visitors to the City of Melbourne will take during the Bioblitz, and also as a way to see how how other members of this great community are going.

Follow the Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 on social media
Facebook: GS Bioblitz
Twitter: GS Bioblitz
Instagram: GS Bioblitz

Contact us through social media or via greatsouthernbioblitz@gmail.com

Good luck to everyone.

@aedmonds @alistair28 @annalanigan @ash_and @fairypossum @finknottle @george_seagull @jameskdouch @kenharris @nimal_karunajeewa @nomennudum @ricardosimao @ryber @snakeboy222 @sporewhore @substanz @tom-nata

Posted on October 17, 2021 02:05 by a_kurek a_kurek | 0 comments | Leave a comment

The Great Southern Bioblitz 2021 is days away!

Hello everyone,

The Great Southern Bioblitz is back for another year. After an amazing event in 2020 the Southern Hemisphere once again gets the opportunity for a large-scale BioBlitz during its Spring. This year's observation period will run from October 22nd-25th, the perfect time for birds, flowering plants, bugs and more.

Spring is the peak time for most species with plants flowering following the cool damp winter and before the heat of summer. It's also the time when most fauna species are active. Large areas of Australia have had a wet winter and early spring this year, so the conditions should be perfect for you to get out and explore your local area to discover what’s around. So, please get involved in this event.

The goal is for members of the community and visitors to the Shire of Corangamite to record as many species as possible during the event dates. Participants are encouraged to submit all observations of plants, animals, insects etc. and it doesn’t matter if they’re from conservation areas, parks or even your backyard. It all counts and will help to demonstrate the diversity of species that call this area home.

Anyone can participate in the Bioblitz, whether as an individual, a family or as a member of an organisation.

This project has been setup to bring together all of the amazing observations that residents / visitors to the Shire of Corangamite will take during the Bioblitz, and also as a way to see how how other members of this great community are going.

Follow the Great Southern BioBlitz on social media
Facebook: GS Bioblitz
Twitter: GS Bioblitz
Instagram: GS Bioblitz

Contact us through social media or via greatsouthernbioblitz@gmail.com

Good luck to everyone.

@andill @banksiaman @beeforbrett @bernie-l @enfieldservices @geoffboyes @gillian94 @johneichler @jpike @koallah @natduck @ninakerr01 @russellbest @suzieandjim @thylacoleo @trevorpescott @vanessatait

Posted on October 17, 2021 01:59 by a_kurek a_kurek | 0 comments | Leave a comment

The Great Southern Bioblitz 2021 is days away!

Hello everyone,

The Great Southern Bioblitz is back for another year. After an amazing event in 2020 the Southern Hemisphere once again gets the opportunity for a large-scale BioBlitz during its Spring. This year's observation period will run from October 22nd-25th, the perfect time for birds, flowering plants, bugs and more.

Spring is the peak time for most species with plants flowering following the cool damp winter and before the heat of summer. It's also the time when most fauna species are active. Large areas of Australia have had a wet winter and early spring this year, so the conditions should be perfect for you to get out and explore your local area to discover what’s around. So, please get involved in this event.

The goal is for members of the community and visitors to the Shire of Glenelg to record as many species as possible during the event dates. Participants are encouraged to submit all observations of plants, animals, insects etc. and it doesn’t matter if they’re from conservation areas, parks or even your backyard. It all counts and will help to demonstrate the diversity of species that call the Shire of Glenelg home.

Anyone can participate in the Bioblitz, whether as an individual, a family or as a member of an organisation.

This project has been setup to bring together all of the amazing observations that members of the Shire of Glenelg will take during the Bioblitz, and also as a way to see how how other members of this great community are going.

Follow the Great Southern BioBlitz on social media
Facebook: GS Bioblitz
Twitter: GS Bioblitz
Instagram: GS Bioblitz

Contact us through social media or via greatsouthernbioblitz@gmail.com

Good luck to everyone.

@andill @annalanigan @banksiaman @elizabethhatfield @jessica_laura @kenharris @linger @lorrainecphelan @lplater @lu-wei @ricardosimao @rickycrawford @vonny01 @w_martin

Posted on October 17, 2021 01:47 by a_kurek a_kurek | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Berry Springs Preserve Herps of Texas report, 15Oct2021

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, there was no group outing to Berry Springs Park and Preserve this month. However, one person checked on the amphibians while texting a local fellow frogger upon arrival and departure (for safety) - the county was still in the Red Phase of COVID-19 transmission due to the highly contagious Delta variant.
Two amphibian species were observed in the middle slough springhead, slough by the playground, the main ponds, and the ditch in the pecan orchard: Rio Grande Leopard Frog (CI = 3) and American Bullfrog (CI = 0). Photos and/or recordings were obtained for both species.
An American Kestrel was seen at sunset, and a Nerodia watersnake was seen in the ditch in the pecan orchard an hour after sunset.
The puddle at the middle slough springhead was larger than last month, and the water level was average in the slough by the playground and main ponds. According to the USGS gauge station at Berry Creek at Airport Rd near Georgetown, TX (https://waterdata.usgs.gov/tx/nwis/uv/?site_no=08105095&PARAmeter_cd=00045), there had been 3.65 inches of rain over the previous five days before monitoring (including 2.25 inches of rain two days before monitoring).
The monitoring period was 19:00 - 20:15.
The author of this journal post was the only participant.
Environmental conditions at the middle slough springhead at sunset:
Air temperature = 69.6 deg F
Water temperature = 67.5 deg F
Sky = no/few clouds
Water level = below average at springhead and average at main ponds
Relative humidity = 42 %

Posted on October 17, 2021 00:51 by k_mccormack k_mccormack | 2 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Recognising mallard x pacific black duck hybrids

Came across this great article that includes an appendix with photos of several hybrid features, scaling them 1-6. 1-2 Being genetically pure Pacific Black Ducks, 3-5 hybrids and 6 being mallards. Features include facial markings, speculum features and leg colour.

https://notornis.osnz.org.nz/system/files/Williams_66_45-63.pdf

Posted on October 17, 2021 00:42 by jason_graham jason_graham | 0 comments | Leave a comment

El “poder” de iNaturalist es que podemos dar nueva vida a nuestros recuerdos.

El “poder” de iNaturalist es que podemos dar nueva vida a nuestros recuerdos. (English below)

Hace 10 años tomé esta foto y la compartí entonces en Facebook. Fue motivo de una serie de actividades en mi trabajo para mejorar el desempeño de la empresa con objetivo de reducir o evitar estos incidentes.
Pero hoy Facebook me recordó esta foto y puedo recuperarla para usarla en iNaturalist y así contribuir con registros sobre la especie, su distribución, su comportamiento y los problemas para su conservación.
Imaginen si cada quien que tiene un recuerdo similar lo compartiera, todo lo que se podría lograr en mejorar nuestro conocimiento. Eso apoyaría mucho más nuestra toma de decisiones para mantener o mejorar nuestro futuro.
Aquí el registro de esta foto


©Antonio W. Salas, some rights reserved (CC-BY)
história por
Antonio W. Salas, , Biologist, herpetologist. Peru. AKA @awsalas

Qual é a sua observação histórica favorita?

Conte-nos abaixo

The ′′ power ′′ of iNaturalist is that we can bring new life to our memories.

10 years ago I took this picture and shared it then on Facebook. It was the reason for a series of activities in my work to improve the company's performance with a view to reducing or avoiding these incidents.
But today Facebook reminded me of this photo and I can recover it for use on iNaturalist and thus contribute records about the species, its distribution, its behaviour and the issues for conservation.
Imagine if everyone who has a similar memory shared it, all that could be accomplished in improving our knowledge. That would greatly support our decision making to maintain or improve our future.

What is your favourite historic observation?

Tell us below

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Posted on October 17, 2021 00:33 by stephen169 stephen169 | 1 comment | Leave a comment

Lab 5 Journal Entry

Blusher's are extremely varied when its comes to their appearance, the common ground is the fact that they blush when bruised. Blusher's can be eaten after being cooked, yet it has a hemolytic toxin that could potentially cause anaemia. Often times, foragers don't eat these types of mushrooms as they can easily be misidentified with others. Blusher's as a group, aren't used for any medicinal purposes.

Posted on October 17, 2021 00:15 by logan330 logan330 | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Las Mariposas Crepusculares

Hoy vamos a contarles sobre algunas mariposas de actividad crepuscular a nocturna.

El orden Lepidoptera está compuesto en su mayoría por linajes nocturnos (en general, llamadas polillas) con muchas adaptaciones morfológicas y conductuales a este estilo de vida. No obstante, durante el día podemos observar polillas de hábitos diurnos, y aunque la mayoría de las mariposas son diurnas, algunos grupos son predominantemente nocturnos, por ejemplo la familia Hedylidae (que detallaremos en otro post). La familia Hesperiidae (skippers o saltarinas) es otra familia que comprende varias especies crepusculares y/o nocturnas. En ambas se ha descrito un tipo de ojo que les permite tener una buena visión de noche, el mismo que se encuentra en otros insectos nocturnos, como por ejemplo las polillas de la familia Sphingidae.

En Argentina, encontramos especies de hespéridos de hábitos crepusculares y/o nocturnos dentro de la subfamilia Eudaminae, en particular en la tribu Phocidini, por lo cual se los han llamado “saltarines nocturnos”. Algunos ejemplos son las especies de los géneros Bungalotis, Cephise, Dyscophellus, Nascus, Pseudonascus, Porphyrogenes, Salatis y Sarmientoia. Mientras que la mayoría de las mariposas vuelan de 9 a 17 hs (esto en general, ya que varía con la época del año y el clima de la región de Argentina que se trate), momento en el cual reposan en un lugar resguardado para pasar la noche, en estos grupos se observa que su actividad inicia pasadas las 16 o 17 hs, que corresponde a una actividad crepuscular. Algunas de estas especies incluso se las ve acercarse a fotos de luz como las polillas. Muchas de las especies pertenecientes a estos géneros tienen ojos rojos vinculados a su visión nocturna, que al parecer difieren en su composición y estructura de los ojos rojos que vemos en algunos saltarines diurnos (los diurnos que tienen ojos rojos, por ejemplo dentro de la subfamilia Hesperiinae, podrían deberse a que vuelan en ambientes selváticos con baja luz, aunque esto se está estudiando aún).

Nascus phocus (Hesperiidae *

También se ha observado actividad crepuscular en el género Celaenorrhinus (familia Pyrginae o Tagiadinae según los últimos trabajos), uno de los primeros ejemplos de agregación de varios individuos para descansar durante el día (parecido a lo que vemos en murciélagos), y tener actividad nocturna. Asimismo, hay algunos ejemplos de actividad crepuscular o matinal (tan temprano como las 6 a.m.) en algunas especies de la subfamilia Hesperiinae.

Ya centrándonos en los que más se conoce esta particularidad, muchos de los Eudaminae crepusculares/nocturnos tienen vuelo zumbante y veloz, se posan en el envés de las hojas, y acuden a flores que abren del atardecer a la mañana. Por su robustez y vuelo pueden recordar a los Sphingidae.

Las podemos ver en la provincia de Misiones, aunque Nascus phocus (ilustrado arriba) se distribuye también en el norte de Corrientes. Respecto a las especies del género Sarmientoia que vuelan en Argentina, tienen una distribución mayor, en ambientes chaqueños del norte del país hasta Córdoba. No vuelan durante las horas del día, sino que se ocultan en cuevas, huecos, troncos de árboles, pozos, grutas o cualquier lugar oscuro, ya sea solitarias o en grupos, manteniendo las alas abiertas o semiabiertas. Se han observado incluso en construcciones, como debajo de puentes o el interior de viviendas. Les dejo un trabajo con observaciones de los hábitos nocturnos de las especies de Sarmientoia que encontramos en Argentina: Link

Por último, y como curiosidad, se han observado asociaciones de varias de estas especies con hormigas guerreras (Formicidae: Ecitoninae), aparentemente buscando deyecciones de aves de las cuales libar (muchas aves siguen a estas hormigas para capturar insectos que huyen de ellas).

Los animo a buscar y tratar de registrar estas curiosas mariposas nocturnas :)



*Imagen de José Roberto Peruca - Flickr: Nascus phocus (Hesperiidae), bajo la licencia Creative Commons Genérica de Atribución/Compartir-Igual 2.0

Bibliografía consultada
Toussaint E. F. A. y A. D. Warren. 2019. A review of red-eye pigmentation and diel activity patterns in skippers (Lepidoptera, Papilionoidea, Hesperiidae), Journal of Natural History, 53:35-36, 2165-2181, DOI: 10.1080/00222933.2019.1692090
Núñez Bustos, E. 2018. Observaciones sobre hábitos nocturnos en tres especies de Sarmientoia Berg (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae: Eudaminae) de Argentina y Bolivia. Tropical Lepidoptera Research, 28: 90-95. 10.5281/zenodo.2028616.
Sourakov A. y P. Houlihan. 2017. Note on nocturnal activity of a skipper, Pseudonascus paulliniae, in French Guiana. Tropical Lepidoptera Research, 27: 26-27.

Posted on October 16, 2021 23:55 by michelledelaloye michelledelaloye | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Fungi Observation research - Hypholoma fasculare

The Hypholoma fasciculare (aka the Sulphur Tuft) is a poisonous species of mushroom. It generally grows in clusters of 20-30 mushrooms, each with a yellow color and bitter taste. After consumption, one can expect stomach pain and diarrhea. Although several deaths have been blamed on the ingestion of the Sulphur Tuft, the “extent and seriousness of poisoning by this fungus is not clear”.

Posted on October 16, 2021 23:36 by mcgrawjustin mcgrawjustin | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Plants Found at Houghton Garden

Today, I went to Houghton Garden and walked around the trial for approximately 40 minutes in total. There was a mid-seventies weather and there was not much wind. The sun was vibrant and shining without clouds blinding its sight. At the beginning of my walk, I saw a few vertical wood-like roots that had thin, forked branches where simple, small brown leaves grew in what appeared to be a circling motion around the branch. This plant had a few spider webs in it. Then, I found tall, vertical plants with wide leaves that seemed to have a circular shape. The plant itself had long stems appeared to rise in order to get sunlight. I had the chance to observe various plants along the trial that had flowers with white, thin, long petals and light brownish flower heads that were found superior to the petals and had a starry-like shape. After a few minutes, I came across a plant in which its stem was green and had leaves branching off in a zig zag pattern on from the stem and from the middle of the leaf the venation patterns were diagonal. These leaves were green, relatively big in size and long from the stem to the tip of the leaf. Nearby, I encountered a plant that had green heart shaped leaves with a curved venation pattern. The edges of the leaf had zig zagged shaped indentations that made the leaves have triangular-like tips. I, then, came across a few plants with a red stem that had long, relatively big, narrow leaves with curved venation that extended from the top of the stem and were positioned in such a way where a yellow seed was found in between the leaves that were surrounding it. Later on, I found a plant with bright, glossy green leaves that turned yellowish towards the center. This plant had a few circular white clumps of flowers growing around the stem that was mostly found on top of where the leaves were branching. As I kept walking, I encountered a plant that was a bright, light green color and it had a stem with lots of branches that branched out diagonally. I found this color and shape to be very peculiar as I had not seen anything like it before, especially in this garden. I also saw a plant with green leaves on the inferior and purple leaves on the superior part that had curved venation and had slightly curved edges. Then, I saw some small plants with light green leaves that were small and curved with a tip. There was a thin green stem that elevated from which a small pink flower rose, which looked like a clump of light pink cotton at first glance. Finally before leaving the trial, I encountered a plant with big, long, elliptic shaped leaves with a curved venation and slight indentations along the edges. This plant had small, thin light green stem that had small, circular like flowering branching out. Overall, I encountered a variety of different plants, some of which were very interesting to observe.

Posted on October 16, 2021 23:18 by floresak floresak | 12 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Abdullah Paracha's Journal Entry

Mushrooms have been around for a long time now, it’s unique characteristics and properties has led to
many researches and new discoveries. One mushroom species observation that I researched was the
cerioporus squamosus “Dryad’s saddle”. Dryad's saddle is a type of fungi (mushroom) that is mostly
found in North America, Europe, and Asia. It has many unique properties such as a pancake shape, or
distinct color patterns, with black lines and designs that represent that of Pheasants, which is a type of
bird. The Dryad’s saddle also has medicinal importance as it consists of biological properties such as
anti - bacterial, and anti - fungal properties, which could be researched on to create new medicines and
cures.

Posted on October 16, 2021 23:10 by abudyy abudyy | 0 comments | Leave a comment

The Dryad's Saddle - Abdullah Paracha's Journal

Mushrooms have been around for a long time now, it’s unique characteristics and properties has led to
many researches and new discoveries. One mushroom species observation that I researched was the
cerioporus squamosus “Dryad’s saddle”. Dryad's saddle is a type of fungi (mushroom) that is mostly
found in North America, Europe, and Asia. It has many unique properties such as a pancake shape, or
distinct color patterns, with black lines and designs that represent that of Pheasants, which is a type of
bird. The Dryad’s saddle also has medicinal importance as it consists of biological properties such as
anti - bacterial, and anti - fungal properties, which could be researched on to create new medicines and
cures.

Posted on October 16, 2021 23:07 by abudyy abudyy | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Mushrooms

A mushroom is the fruiting body of a fungus, which have a stem, cap, and gills. These gills produce spores which help the fungus spread around the forest. Mushrooms vary in appearance with more than 10000 known types, and can be a good source of vitamin D. However these mushrooms are often under-appreciated as they have many uses especially in medicine, and have been for many years.

Posted on October 16, 2021 22:47 by nico_gil nico_gil | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Cristina Bitar, Turkery Tail Fungus

The Trametes versicolor more commonly known as the Turkey Tail fungus is found in North American woods in trees. They do not have a stalk present but a concave cup that is attached to a tree. This fungus has multicolored stripes in the conk which contain pores contrary to most common fungi. The Turkey Tail fungus is a saprotrophic organism which breaks down the deadwood of the tree it is attached to absorbing its nutrients. Since it consumes lignin in the trees, they produce white rot in contrary to organisms that consume cellulose faster which creates red rot. This fungus grows in wet shady areas with a lot of trees allowing them to grow and reproduce.

Posted on October 16, 2021 21:46 by cristinabitar cristinabitar | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Younghun Song, 260961905, Jiayi, Fungi

I am going to do some research on Turkey-Tail because it looks most interesting to me. This Turkey-Tail mushroom is widely known for usage of medicine, enhancing the immune system. By consuming this mushroom, we can ingest myriads of antioxidants which lowers the oxidative stress by balancing out unstable molecules. As a result, we can lower the chance of getting inflammation and cellular damage. Also, it contains a lot of polysaccharopeptides which boosts up the immune system. Indeed, it is known to suppress certain tumors and used for cancer treatment. After researching about Turkey-Tail mushroom, I was impressed with the diversity of fungi that it can be both beneficial and harmful to humans in various ways.

Kubala, J. (2018, November 6). 5 immune-boosting benefits of Turkey tail mushroom. Healthline. Retrieved October 16, 2021, from https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/turkey-tail-mushroom#TOC_TITLE_HDR_3.

Posted on October 16, 2021 20:31 by younghun_song younghun_song | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Sophie Krouse: A Brief Summary of the Medicinal Uses of Laetiporus sulphureus

Laetiporus sulphureus, or more commonly known as Chicken of the Woods for its similar taste to chicken (when prepared properly), is a common wood-decaying (lignin-decaying) fungus, and a frequent cause of brown-rot disease in trees. Though most wood-decaying fungal species have shown little use in the medical field, recent studies have shown the potential of Laetiporus sulphureus in medicinal use.

Extracts of Laetiporus sulphureus have shown the ability to decay cells as well (cytotoxic), while provides promising anticancer abilities in attacking cancer cells. This cytotoxic ability also translates to antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties, as bacterial cells can be decayed by the fungus thereby relieving inflammation caused by bacterial infections. On the opposite end of the spectrum, ethanolic extracts of Laetiporus sulphureus have shown antioxidant abilities as well, in which they slow down the decaying process of cells exposed to free radicals, making the medicinal uses of this organism very diverse and promising for future medical research.

Posted on October 16, 2021 20:22 by sophiekrouse sophiekrouse | 1 observation | 0 comments | Leave a comment

The Wonderfully Caring and Protective Mother Mouse

'Twas a cold and foggy night. I was out, looking for snakes. I never would have been able to predict the events of that night.

I was looking under some logs and rocks. I had probably been looking for a few hours, with little success. I came close to a log pile I had not searched yet, and begin looking. It wasn't long before I saw movement.

At first, it was just a leafy rustle and a slithering tail: the creature went under another log. I rolled that log over, and underneath was a small, furry little mouse. I was surprised, but pleased nonetheless. I gently captured the mouse in a small, breathable container, and brought it to my base for observation. I had not been planning to keep the mouse for more than a few minutes after observation.

I am no mouse expert. I am a snake and reptiles person. I didn't know that the mouse was pregnant.

She gave birth the moment I placed her in a large box.

I didn't know what to do! I did what I could, placing a good amount of straw, wood chips, and leaves for her to make a nest with.

As I placed the materials in the nest, the mother mouse ran around the box, frightened. The baby mice (pups) were scattered all over the box. There were about 8 of them!

I placed a small watering tin in the box, and then closed it. I was pretty worried!

I came out again, at close to 11 pm. The air was chilly, and there was a slight breeze. I opened the box, and was amazed at what I saw: the mother mouse had made a small nest in the center of the box, and held all of her pups tightly, right next to her. It dawned on me how loving these animals can be, and how important they are to each other.

The next day, I brought some food for them. As you'll recall, the night before, before she had given birth, the mother mouse fled from my hand. Now, when I lowered my hand to drop the food in, the mouse placed herself between my hand and her pups: defending them.

I had never had any real experience with mice before this: They are generally thought of as property destroyers, and pests. I know better now.

Because of this experience with this mother mouse and her pups, I have grown to like mice. They can be a nuisance to people, but they are just trying to survive. After realizing how caring, protective, and wonderful these rodents are, I do all I can to help them.

My encouragement to all is, if you encounter mice in your house, lure them into a bucket or a box, and release them in the wild: I urge you not to kill them. They are devoted and loving creatures, and more than worthy of our respect!

Posted on October 16, 2021 20:09 by mr_reptile mr_reptile | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Cristina Bitar, Adaptations on observations

One of the observations I found was the Common toadflax (Linaria vulgaris). The Common toadflax has the adaptation of being able to grow in different conditions. It has been found to grow in sand-gravelly soils but also in more moist soils. It is also found in a variety of habitats including sea shores, mountains, meadows and forests. Most of the observations I recorded had the adaption of withstanding cold temperatures however, some plants such as the persian walnut (Juglans regia) cannot tolerate very cold weather. The Basswood (Tilia americana) is located in the eukaryote branch specifically where its most common ancestors are 20 species located in the Tilia branch in the phylogenetic tree.

Posted on October 16, 2021 20:09 by cristinabitar cristinabitar | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Lab 5- Fungi Journal Entry

One of the species I observed was Physia caesia, commonly known as Rosette Lichens. Rosette lichens are a robust species and can tolerate a vast range of environmental conditions. Accordingly, they are found worldwide, from Oceania to North America and even Antarctica (Olech, 1996). The combination of fungi and green algae grows on weekly acidic to alkaline rock and the bark of certain trees, enabling it to receive its essential nutrients (Hauck, 2009). These nutrients include nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (Hauck, 2009). Rosette lichens have an intermediate response to pollution; this means it is less common in areas with high levels of pollutants (Rains, 2018). For this reason, the species is used to determine the cleanliness of the environment. These lichens also absorb some of the heavy metals in the air (Rains, 2018), benefiting the entire ecosystem, including humans.

Hauck, M., Paul, A., & Leuschner, C. (2009, November 25). Element uptake in thalli of the lichen physcia caesia from sandstone and calcareous substratum. Wiley Online Library. Retrieved October 16, 2021, from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jpln.200900059?casa_token=guaNzV1ljw4AAAAA%3AcRalK9o6_o9JgvtMJ5-XafFKyn5e9BO9_-mDXR0O9n3G1vSkGmRT18OD3PuSFoXjaQZMAEc_UEC0IWM.

Olech , M. (1996). Human Impact On Terrestrial Ecosystems in West Antartica. Retrieved October 16, 2021, from https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.991.496&rep=rep1&type=pdf.

Rains, T. (2018). Lichen - The Little Things That Matter . National Parks Service. Retrieved October 16, 2021, from https://www.nps.gov/articles/lichen-and-our-air.htm.

Posted on October 16, 2021 16:51 by sophierc123 sophierc123 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Underappreciated sites: Neighborhoods

Neighborhoods are absolutely hopping with birds, but many people are hesitant to look for birds in neighborhoods for fear of looking creepy. Admittedly, describing someone driving slowly through a neighborhood peering into backyards with a pair of binoculars or camera, might be hard to make sound innocent.

However, neighborhoods often contain orchard pockets, garden plots, bird feeders, hedgerows, and are sometimes in sheltered ravines. Plus, unlike with roadside birding where you might have whole square miles that are not accessible due to lack of roads, neighborhoods are intersected and crisscrossed with so many side streets you'd be amazed at how much time you can spend exploring them. This is also handy if you have a creek running through; check every street that crosses the the creek. So they are definitely worth checking, but how do you make it less creepy?

First thing that helps, is get out and walk. Driving slowly through a neighborhood might look odd, but walking through doesn't look or feel near as creepy, plus you have better hearing.

Second thing: Bicycle. I think bikes are not used nearly enough on these counts anyway, but one of my best counts that had neighborhoods was one where I brought my bike and covered a large chunk of the territory. You move faster than on foot, which is good because you can cover a lot more area with all of the side streets, but you have better hearing and visibility than in a car.

Talk to people. I don't really like talking to people on count day (I've run into some real conversationalists when I'm trying to use as much of the day as possible counting birds,) but I have knocked on doors before to ask if I could stare into their backyard for a few minutes if they had a lot of birds. I prefer to do that when scouting for a count rather then the actual count though.

Posted on October 16, 2021 16:38 by neylon neylon | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Underappreciated sites: Golf Courses

In my opinion, golf courses are under-utilized by counters doing CBC's, due to the fact that they are large mostly mowed grass fields that don't look that interesting. However, I've never birded a golf course that I didn't turn up Great Horned Owls. They have water resources in the form of ponds and creeks, and hedge rows surrounding them. They often have berry bushes, meaning that they usually have Cedar Waxwings.

In 2020 I was asked to lead a couple of winter bird walks at a local golf course that I wasn't familiar with and had never been to. During the scouting trips I made, I was surprised by the variety of birds that turned up, including Belted Kingfisher, Hermit Thrush, Eastern Bluebird and a large number of the most photogenic Cedar Waxwings I've dealt with. The walks ended up being so popular that we did three and I had to recruit assistants because of how many people signed up.

Some golf courses are open in the winter for cross-country skiers. Please bear in mind, do not walk on the ski trails, that makes it harder to ski on them and doesn't foment feelings of good will towards birders.

If the golf course is not open during the winter, consider contacting them and requesting permission to look for birds. You might be surprised by what is out there.

Posted on October 16, 2021 16:35 by neylon neylon | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Tips: Private Property

When given an area for a bird count, invariably most of it will be private property that you can't just go waltzing onto to look for birds just because you might have seen a Goshawk. So do you leave all this area uncounted? Well often yes; the compiler will have given you a large enough area that you will be plenty busy in the places that you can be without worrying about places that you can't.

However, this doesn't mean that you have to miss these spots. There is a very simple solution for this: ask permission. I know a guy who gets some of his best finds at a closed kids summer camp, because he contacted the owners and asked if he could count there. The same guy contacted a plant nursery and got their permission to wander around their property. One time I was doing a new count (for me) and saw a huge flock of birds fly into a backyard with a privacy fence, I knocked on the door to ask if I could look in their backyard, and surprise, it was one of my customers. Their yard became a great go-to spot in future years.

As long as you're respectful of people's property and their privacy (don't put an eBird pin right on their house for the Northern Hawk Owl you found without their permission), you'd be amazed at how many more places you can get opened up to you. By the way, if you do get into some private areas, then let the compiler know that you may need a smaller area in order to still get adequate coverage.

The same goes for sites that are seasonally closed, for the Rock Cut CBC for example, many of our sites are closed for the winter, but we got permission from the conservation district to enter those sites on count day, if you do this, I would recommend that you get a letter that you can display on your dashboard which police would see if they get called by a neighbor.

As an aside, if you get permission to go onto an otherwise restricted property, consider keeping a separate list of birds and giving it to the owner afterwards, in most cases you will have birds on there that they've never heard of, and that can get people excited, meaning that they may want you back next year, or you might make a new birder out of them.

Posted on October 16, 2021 16:34 by neylon neylon | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Tips: Roadside Birding

When people signup for Christmas Bird Counts, they often focus so heavily on the forest preserves that they end up missing a prime area to find birds: the roadsides.

Driving slowly through the country can yield some incredible birds, some of which are only going to be in the farmland, not in the preserves. Things like Rough-legged Hawks, Horned Larks, Lapland Longspurs, Snow Bunting, Common Grackle, and Snowy Owl. Spending time in this habitat not only gives you the opportunity of finding these birds, but it also gives better coverage on the circle; there is a reason why the compiler assigned multiple square miles but only one or two forest preserves.

Drive Slowly!
Flying along at 45-55 mph might be great for getting from point A to point B, but it's terrible for finding birds between those points. Whether you're driving from one count site to another or you want to spend some time on the roadsides, drive slow, think 15-20 mph and put your windows down.

Look for reasons to stop.
Are you passing over a creek? Stop. Get out of the car and listen. Kingfishers, snipes, chickadees and warblers will often hang out in places like this. Especially if it's below freezing but this creek still has water in it.
Are you driving along a hedgerow? Stop. Get out of the car and listen, chickadees, juncos, accipiters, and shrikes and finches like to take shelter in hedgerows.
White something way out in the field? Stop. Get the scope out, make sure it isn't Snow Goose, swans, or a Snowy Owl. Often it's a bucket but you never know.
A group of birds by the roadside? Stop. Check them out for sparrows, longspurs, buntings and juncos.
Feel like stopping? Do it. You are much more likely to find birds if you're not also concentrating on driving.

Watch for similar birds.
In some areas you can find multiple species but not notice right away. Stopping at grain silos is a good example: most of the doves will be Rock Pigeons and Mourning Doves, but keep and eye out for Eurasian Collared-Doves. Large group of House Sparrows? One time I found some House Sparrows that had half a dozen Eurasian Tree Sparrows in the group, one time there was a female Purple Finch in the mix, one time a Song Sparrow.

Areas like this where you're not dealing with a forest preserve that has a trail system require a little more imagination when you're trying to decide where to look for birds. But for me, that just makes it more interesting. Also remember: try to get out for some scouting prior to the count.

Posted on October 16, 2021 16:31 by neylon neylon | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Tips: Feeder Watching for Christmas Bird Counts

One often overlooked way to participate in Christmas Bird Counts, is to sign up to count the birds that come to your yard and feeders for a couple of hours. Obviously this would only work if your house is in a count circle, see this map https://audubon.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/index.html?appid=ac275eeb01434cedb1c5dcd0fd3fc7b4 which shows all of the count circles.

For some people who want to participate but can't due to health or scheduling reasons, or simply find the prospect of going out for the whole day looking for birds they may have never seen before to be a bit daunting, this can be a great alternative. It's just your yard, for about two hours.

Some people ask if there is any value to just counting yard birds for only a couple of hours. The answer is a resounding yes! The idea behind the CBC is to count every bird in a 177 square mile circle, which is regrettably impossible, but the more people who are collecting data, the more of the circle gets covered. The presence of feeder counters means that field counters can work with slightly smaller territories by skipping the neighborhoods that have feeder counters, devoting time elsewhere. I would also add that neighborhoods are just another type of habitat that attracts certain types of birds, but many field counters don't like going into them for fear of looking creepy by driving slowly with binoculars. You can usually tell which counts didn't have feeder counters: low numbers of House Finches, Dark-eyed Junco, House Sparrows, ect.

To go over how to do it, basically you count every bird that you see on the count day for at least a couple of hours. However to avoid double counting birds, you will want to count using a few parameters. First, only include the highest amount per species that you saw at one time, so if you look out and there are three chickadees on the feeders and they fly away and later two come back, you can’t add any to your previous three. If on the other hand they fly away and four come in later, than you would add one to your three because you can physically see four chickadees. Something to remember here that might up your numbers: frequently when a flock birds come to a feeding station, they don’t all come in at once, so if you can see the bushes and trees in your yard, train your binoculars on them, the rest of the flock may be scattered all around your yard and are just coming by ones and twos.
Another thing that is important to remember, sexes don’t count for this, so if you see three male cardinals on your feeders and they fly away and then later four female cardinals fly in you can still only add one to your current three. The reason they are counted in this way, is to avoid giving a count bonus to bird species where the males and females differ (cardinals, finches, woodpeckers, some sparrows) over birds where they don’t differ (chickadees, blue jays, nuthatches, other sparrows). If you remember the cardinal example from earlier, if you switch those to chickadees, you would have no idea if the new ones coming in were males or females. By counting in this way, all of the birds are counted the same.
For a couple of ways to spice up your count a little bit, remember earlier when I said to look in the bushes and trees for more birds, well sometimes you can see other species as well; things like Carolina and Winter Wren, Brown Creeper, Yellow-rumped Warbler (or even other warblers) sometimes hang around flocks of chickadees for the flock protection but aren’t particularly interested in the seeds that are in bird feeders, so they forage in the in foliage until the chickadees are done and they all keep going. Watch for Cooper’s Hawks that may turn up, don’t forget to add them. If you happen to know about an owl that is in your neighborhood, stepping out before dawn or after dark and listening would be a great way to add him to your list and don't forget to add the time spent listening for owls.
Keep a camera handy, if you have a rare bird turn up at the feeder, then you will need to document it and that is much easier with a camera.

Posted on October 16, 2021 16:28 by neylon neylon | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Watering in September and October

Watering dates:
Sept 7, Sept 14, Sept 16, Sept 23
Oct 1, Oct 8, Oct 15
During that time, 1656.7 gallons of water were used .
That is an average of 276 gallons a week.

Posted on October 16, 2021 16:05 by jeanbog jeanbog | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Свежие данные GBIF (15 октября 2021 г.)

Дорогие друзья!

Постепенно к сообществу проекта "Флора России" присоединяются всё новые пользователи. Изредка мы рассказываем о том, как взаимодействуют iNaturalist и GBIF. Пост месячной давности тут: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/flora-of-russia/journal/56284-svezhie-dannye-gbif-7-sentyabrya-2021-g .

Итак, Global Biodiversity Information Facility (https://www.gbif.org/) - это глобальная платформа-агрегатор данных о биоразнообразии. Их здесь очень много: 1 891 733 741 фактов присутствия того или иного вида в той или иной точке. Это и наблюдения, и образцы, и окаменелости, и данные литературы. Чтобы все эти данные оказались доступны в одном месте, 1747 организаций по всему миру объединили здесь свои 62 595 баз данных - больших и малых. Российские организации (университеты, академические институты, музеи, ООПТ) опубликовали в GBIF 542 базы данных.

Любой пользователь может освоить несложную поисковую систему GBIF (https://www.gbif.org/occurrence/search) и найти то, что ему интересно. Система поисковых фильтров GBIF отличается богатым выбором настроек и стремительным отображением результатов, несмотря на гигантские объемы данных. Мой опыт показывает, что искать здесь отдельные наблюдения гораздо быстрее, чем на iNaturalist. Кроме того, удобно, следуя гиперссылкам, исправлять определение какой-нибудь случайной ошибки из числа наблюдений iNat, прошедших в GBIF.

Конечно, среди баз данных о биоразнообразии есть очень большие массивы! Вот, как выглядит сейчас десятка самых больших:

1) EOD – eBird Observation Dataset 872 206 403
2) Artportalen (Swedish Species Observation System) 82 017 115
3) Observation.org, Nature data from around the World 39 969 765
4) iNaturalist Research-grade Observations 34 983 593
5) DOF - Observations from the Danish Ornithological Society 27 335 045
6) Norwegian Species Observation Service 25 963 444
7) INPN - Données flore des CBN agrégées par la FCBN 20 999 334
8) Southern African Bird Atlas Project 2 17 847 718
9) USGS PWRC - Bird Banding Lab - US State Centroid - 1960-2010 14 079 367
10) Waarnemingen.be - Bird occurrences in Flanders and the Brussels Capital Region, Belgium 12 811 851

А вот как выглядит другая десятка - с данными по сосудистым растениям.

1) INPN - Données flore des CBN agrégées par la FCBN 20 960 245
2) Artportalen (Swedish Species Observation System) 14 230 807
3) iNaturalist Research-grade Observations 13 356 321
4) Dutch Vegetation Database 11 108 843
5) The Danish Environmental Portal, species and habitats-database "Danmarks Miljøportals Naturdatabase" 10 851 858
6) Pl@ntNet automatically identified occurrences 9 634 639
7) Flora von Deutschland (Phanerogamen) 9 255 906
8) BSBI data from several English counties, up to 2015 8 158 299
9) Flore du Bassin parisien (CBNBP) 7 781 823
10) Floristic records from survey studies of the Bayerisches Landesamt für Umwelt 7 131 328

Как видно из обоих списков, данные из iNaturalist являются одним из ведущих источников данных в GBIF - как по всем группам живых организмов (4-е место), так и по сосудистым растениям (3-е место). И эти данные постоянно растут. По прогнозам и динамике, iNat выйдет на второе место по сосудистым растениям уже в этом году, а в следующем году станет первым. И нашему сообществу предстоит сыграть в этом ключевую роль.

На iNaturalist 83,0 млн "проверяемых" наблюдений, а в GBIF попадает лишь 35,0 млн (https://doi.org/10.15468/ab3s5x). Почему? Дело в том, что одновременно:

  • наблюдение должно иметь исследовательский статус;
  • наблюдение должно иметь открытую лицензию (CC0, CC-BY, CC-BY-NC);
  • а сами данные при этом публикуются с задержкой (сейчас данные от 7.10.2021).

Давайте сравним две ссылки на одно и то же наблюдение:

https://www.gbif.org/occurrence/3017963860
https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/67518248

Автор не указал своего полного имени в профиле, поэтому в GBIF он числится как "Denis". Так что стоит указать полное имя в профиле в соответствующем разделе (лучше латиницей!). Автором определения значится в GBIF Игорь Поспелов, поскольку он первый указал правильное название вида. Ссылка на автора определения нормируется с помощью номера ORCID, который каждый пользователь может привязать в своем личном кабинете. В паспорте наблюдения на iNaturalist есть ссылка на GBIF ("Это наблюдение размещено на 1 сайте: GBIF"), обратная ссылка на сайте GBIF имеется с момента заливки.

У GBIF своя номенклатура (так называемый "GBIF Backbone"), которая автоматически стыкуется с названиями iNat, а также имеется в расширенном поиске фильтр по автору находки, так что можете выбрать и посмотреть, какие ваши наблюдения попали в GBIF. Недавно там появился поиск по административным единицам (правда, карта заложена 10-летней давности, так что границы Москвы и Подмосковья, например, старые).

Если вы хотите, чтобы ваши наблюдения попали в GBIF, то необходимо удостовериться, что у вас выставлена открытая лицензия. Это можно сделать как через сайт, так и через приложение в настройках учётной записи. Если у вас не проставлена лицензия, то в карточке каждого наблюдения у вас в правом нижнем углу написано "Все права защищены", если проставлена, то, как правило, - "Некоторые права защищены".

Отдельно отметим, что все топ-100 наблюдателей проекта "Флора России" перешли на свободные лицензии. Доля наблюдений проекта, заблокированных жёсткими лицензиями, сократилась сейчас до рекордной отметки в 10,1%! Это наше большое общее достижение в деле открытого доступа к данным о биоразнообразии. Большое спасибо, что не оставили без внимания предыдущие посты о GBIF. Возможно, в этот раз отклик будет еще шире.

Зачем всё это нужно?

Самый простой ответ заключается в том, что именно из GBIF исследователи выгружают данные о растениях, грибах и животных в удобном виде (csv-выгрузки). Каждая такая выгрузка получает doi, с помощью которого отслеживаются цитирования в научных исследованиях. Так, массив данных iNaturalist (https://doi.org/10.15468/ab3s5x ) процитирован через GBIF уже 1859 раз! Это рекорд среди всех участников GBIF.


РОССИЯ

На данный момент в GBIF индексируется уже 7,73 млн записей о биоразнообразии России - 7,53 млн с основной территории и 0,20 млн из Крыма. При этом, iNaturalist является самым большим по объему источником данных о природе России (занимает долю 25,9% по основной территории и 51,3% по Крыму). Эта доля постоянно растёт благодаря нашим усилиям.

Вот, какие массивы данных по биоразнообразию России являются крупнейшими сегодня:

1) iNaturalist Research-grade Observations 1 951 884
2) Moscow University Herbarium (MW) 667 248
3) RU-BIRDS.RU, Birds observations database from Russia and neighboring regions. Zoological Museum of M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University. 497 108
4) EOD – eBird Observation Dataset 387 883
5) Locations of plants on dot distribution maps in the Flora of Siberia (Flora Sibiraea, 1987–1997) 169 854
6) FLORUS: miscellaneous records 141 294
7) Flora of Vladimir Oblast, Russia: an updated grid dataset (1867–2020) 130 054
8) Finnish Floristic Database (Finnish Museum of Natural History Collections) 106 396
9) Birds of Northern Eurasia 86 992
10) Chronicle of Nature - Phenology of Plants of Zhiguli Nature Reserve 86 524

А вот, что есть в GBIF по сосудистым растениям России:

1) iNaturalist Research-grade Observations 1 266 897
2) Moscow University Herbarium (MW) 594 983
3) Locations of plants on dot distribution maps in the Flora of Siberia (Flora Sibiraea, 1987–1997) 169 854
4) FLORUS: miscellaneous records 141 294
5) Flora of Vladimir Oblast, Russia: an updated grid dataset (1867–2020) 130 054
6) Finnish Floristic Database (Finnish Museum of Natural History Collections) 106 241
7) Chronicle of Nature - Phenology of Plants of Zhiguli Nature Reserve 86 524
8) MHA Herbarium: collections of vascular plants 80 031
9) Pl@ntNet automatically identified occurrences 71 567
10) A global database for the distributions of crop wild relatives 69 255

P.S. Если у кого-то есть электронные таблицы с надёжными данными о встречах живых организмов, которые не пролезают на iNaturalist, то в принципе мы можем помочь с их публикацией в GBIF. Это могут быть данные геоботанических описаний, каталоги коллекций, флористические списки и проч. Пишите на почту botanik.seregin@gmail.com

Posted on October 16, 2021 13:41 by apseregin apseregin | 0 comments | Leave a comment

Presenting Ecuador

O Ecuador tem 9 áreas incríveis no # GSB202, isso é incrível, vamos passar por elas e conhecer os organizadores! thankyou Sofía Nogales Trujillo (@sofianogales ) iNaturalist Ecuador Site Admin (Ecuador)

Carchi

organizadoras- Sofía Nogales Trujillo (@sofianogales ) -bióloga, interesada en conocer la ecología y diversidad de las mariposas en mi país. le encanta trabajar en proyectos de ciencia ciudadana.

especies más comunes -Espeletia pycnophylla

© Diego Polo, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC)
@diegopolo

@fernandanaidelinnarvaez040 @stalin4 @cynthia_delgado8 @sofianogales @gabrielmicanquer @jhohannes_ale @greening_merle @edu_obando @estefania_huera @jorgebrito @mayu_vivas @tanii1 @mario_yanez_munoz @danbiol @daniel418 @anita464 @willianenriquez @efrainfreire @jesrealpe @anddynic17 @mfernanda_17 @edison10 @carlossebas @diegoaragon1 @dn_sc @andrespuma @karla436 @damisbcc @leoberlys_males @alen9 @nayeliuyana @jeffersonmorillo @oviedoalexandra @mauricio-herrera-madrid @lupe18 @diana836 @leydidayahe @andybetter @harvey27 @matias2707 @rebecar24 @sneider1 @dawicho @camii4 @yeraldytarapues12345 @chafny @ladyjazmin @xandersonx @xime_aguas @aleja_ @fabiocianferoni @tomas_sebastian @anita_figueroa @clarita10 @danplant @carlos1311 @inclandj @amy_ortega @dario05 @hazel_trujillo @shalodesuarez @entoagroutn @evelynelizabeth @odalys7_chamorro @wennading @araceli_taicus @ecuadornaturetours @shirleychamorro @miguel_urgiles @christoph_moning @gitanomad @leonardponc @n_coral @fernanda-mena @aleibujes25 @carloscastromoran @nataliacadena @touroult @jonathan_janse @josselin_portilla @scarleth_b @maximerome @pablo_cuesta @eliana_huertas @emily_chiles @mariadaniela1 @jhonny_vargas @karen290599 @naturesebas @anabel_erazo @roberin_cas @varinia2403 @anajudith @cristianlopez_

El Oro

organizador @jmedina22
con más de 2000 especies registradas, esta será un área para observar
especies más comunes observadas, Anthony's Poison Arrow Frog Epipedobates anthonyi

© Mickaël Villemagne, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC),
@mickvil

@arlennsalazar @jorgebrito @daviles @valeriamb @rob-westerduijn @rudygelis @fagagiab2281828 @marlon71 @lolavioleta @karelys21 @brianaaguilar @angelmario @santiagoorc @alissonromero10 @paul_pina @elizabeth_moreira @alisson_romero_cardenas_ @ripleyrm @gustavomorejon @santiago54ord @amada_apolo @glendapozo @aeleon @joselincabrera @agroluna @miguel_urgiles @jcamacho @subhashc @julieacaro27 @misheltinoco @rogerritt @jordy2012 @leslie_flint @felipecampos @henryrojas @steve259 @jonathanaguirre @jenniffer_g29 @mickvil @estebansurez @fernandoar @fabys @green5 @marjorieg @apariciofelipecollaguazoyaguachi @kerly12 @hippiejulian @inicio_eduardo_chamba_matute @feenstra @melina_merino @daniela_valarezo @kmorocho7 @cesarg @cecibelcabrera @julio206 @ricalaba @upupamartin @abcdefgewing @angieramirez2 @emilyacaro @kevin1405 @mauricio-herrera-madrid @cristhian_xavier_teran_meneses @kristell_ivania @mbstevens @jimjohnson @robertloaizam @andresaguilar @holgersanchez @sofianogales @kabirbosques @tomdriscoll @crist1 @marianpesantez @alexander18428 @angelpaul @francesfo @steeven1 @tlaloc27 @luisbcb @panchoprieto @adrianacarrion @gmontgomery @juanfcordero @prengel 10@ronald_99 @brenda_99 @jramon21 @paula_alejandra @peterzika @aaron_gomez @alejar @bogwalker @danielsanmartin @desertnaturalist @emiliavivanco @emoran04 @endalamo @jonafish @karlapezo24 @valeria_nicole_romero_torres @ariana_agila @arutamecotours @carlos_parraga @evasarangoj @jose_rivas @maureen199 @thibaudaronson @ajcuripoma @alejandro1208 @alexandervalarezo8 @christel_quezada @dacgarmando @lesly_nathaly_rogel_cun @loryfinch @manuelmejia @nayeli-rey-fce @parzudak @alonso_reascos @cesaralvarezs @dactylor @ian727 @jahirhugo @phaynes @scottdwilson @wavellf @agroservicios @alisson_inoska @benjaminnavas @csanchezj7 @isabel_cordova @karenari @leocabrera @luiscalapi @maria_cd @adamary @alonmendez @andmisa @armando_ulloa @chrasrey @evelin15 @jeansantos10_ @paula_ambiental @sully7 @cechav2707 @dianelly25 @felipeserrano @geenaminchalo @hajo @idbirds @jocateme @kevinsv @zabka @benjaminhidalgo @briouch @calochex @gioconda @isaacblacio8 @jorgepatino @joshuaparedes @josue16 @karen314 @p_joe @rogger07 @steveenmaxivalarezo @tabata_parrales @ana_gallov @catharus @davidweaver @diego512 @farpost @francymora @gabo22 @kevinherrera99 @luis_arturo @mario2301 @mattclark72 @pricacor @rbeunen @ronaldbravo @ronnymatamoros @serge114 @bolivararias @bryanbustos1 @carloslara2023

Loja

La provincia de Loja participará por segunda vez de este evento e involucrará a la mayor cantidad de personas, clubes ecológicos, universidades y personas interesadas. Te invitamos a ser parte de este evento mundial y contribuir al conocimiento de la biodiversidad local.
organizador- Green Jewel (@green5 )
Somos una iniciativa que trabaja por la conservación de la biodiversidad y el desarrollo sostenible en el sur del Ecuador. Actualmente desarrollamos un proyecto de Ciencia Ciudadana llamado "Biodiversidad del Sur del Ecuador".
María Cristina Córdova (@maria_cd) Biology student
Santiago Hualpa (@sfhualpa )Herpetologist
Daniel Hualpa (@daniel_hualpa)
Angel Mario Hualpa Erazo (@angelmario ) Trabajo por la conservación de la biodiversidad y el desarrollo sostenible en el sur del Ecuador.
Co-fundador y Coordinador de Green Jewel

con más de 2889 especies registradas, esta será un área para observar
especies más comunes observadas Saffron Finch Sicalis flaveola

© blackmambafive, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC)

Tena

organizador- Daning Montaño (@daning98 )
Diego F. Cisneros-Heredia (@cisnerosheredia) 'Investigador con una pasión absoluta por la historia natural. Vivo en Ecuador y me interesan todos los seres vivos, pero en especial, las aves, los reptiles, los anfibios, las arañas, los escarabajos coccinellidos, los gusanos terciopelo.'
Emilia Peñaherrera (@emiliapenaherrera ) 'Soy Bióloga e investigadora, y vivo en Ecuador. Me interesan bastante los anfibios y reptiles, pero en los últimos años me he dedicado a trabajar con escarabajos coccinélidos (mariquitas) del país.'

especies más comunes observadas African Giant Snail Lissachatina fulica

© martincardenas, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC)
@martincardenas

Galápagos

organizador- Diego F. Cisneros-Heredia (@cisnerosheredia) 'Investigador con una pasión absoluta por la historia natural. Vivo en Ecuador y me interesan todos los seres vivos, pero en especial, las aves, los reptiles, los anfibios, las arañas, los escarabajos coccinellidos, los gusanos terciopelo.'
dani2302
Emilia Peñaherrera (@emiliapenaherrera ) 'Soy Bióloga e investigadora, y vivo en Ecuador. Me interesan bastante los anfibios y reptiles, pero en los últimos años me he dedicado a trabajar con escarabajos coccinélidos (mariquitas) del país.'
especies más comunes observadas Marine IguanaAmblyrhynchus cristatus

© Brad Nissen,
@brewkeeper, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC)

Quito & Pichincha

organizador- Diego F. Cisneros-Heredia (@cisnerosheredia) 'Investigador con una pasión absoluta por la historia natural. Vivo en Ecuador y me interesan todos los seres vivos, pero en especial, las aves, los reptiles, los anfibios, las arañas, los escarabajos coccinellidos, los gusanos terciopelo.'
dani2302
Emilia Peñaherrera (@emiliapenaherrera ) 'Soy Bióloga e investigadora, y vivo en Ecuador. Me interesan bastante los anfibios y reptiles, pero en los últimos años me he dedicado a trabajar con escarabajos coccinélidos (mariquitas) del país.'
con más de 12, 138 especies registradas, esta será un área para observar
especies más comunes observadas Eared Dove Zenaida auriculata

© David Torres, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC)

Sucumbíos

especies más comunes observadas Hoatzin Opisthocomus hoazin

© William Hull, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC)
@mangoverde

@beavisnail @howardfriedman1 @stephen220 @damontighe @vkcruzjumbo @cullin @glendapozo @judygva @arjonker @cgates326 @davidr @hdcooper @lszterrill @natforlife @seigmond @stanlilley @abr @alazere @alexwcranston @benzerante @biologistdave @blythenilson @brewkeeper @carmelo_lopez @chloe_and_trevor @dustdevil @ecuadornaturetours @felipecampos @frankf @galozapatarios @geichhorn @gladysyaritza @harv @hdemann @jaime_gavidia @jansvetlik @jeanpaulboerekamps @jeduardo_2125 @jorgebrito @joseruisantos @kenharris @khgaudry @mangoverde @marcocepedavizuete @markrobinson @mattclark72 @md-in-ns15
@micahfreedman @michaelhanrahan @paldaz @phyvonen @redabbott @reptileeric @rocio_vargas @rubenvinueza @ryruther @sandboa @taopina @thibaut-pilatte @tonnyrojasc @valeriaochoah @verocrespoperez @wavellf @wouter_oe @ziggypop74

Yantzaza

Michael Vicente Riofrio @michael-v
Gran BioBlitz del Sur Yantzaza 2021 busca generar conocimiento y la puesta en valor de la riqueza biológica que se encuentra dentro del Cantón Yantzaza, mediante la participación ciudadana recopilar información de las diferentes especies animales que habitan en la localidad logrando así aportar al conocimiento de la Biodiversidad en el sur del Ecuador.#biodiversidad #cienciaciudadana
especies más comunes observadas Silver-beaked TanagerRamphocelus carbo

© Finca Yantza, Zamora-Chinchipe, Ecuador, some rights reserved (CC-BY-NC),
@yantza

@angelmario @daniel_hualpa @michael-v @maria_cd @paskal98 @yuleidy_castro @jorgebrito @mireya25 @ecuadornaturetours @glendapozo @edison10 @eduardo_go98 @felipecampos @anayela @katherine_lizbeth_bravo_landacay @lc_three @hippiejulian @greysvasquez @federicogg @aron_chimbo @luisleonachupallas @tlaloc27 @lolavioleta @daltonmorocho @farpost @jhandrypaulguaya @juan813 @nataliaescobar @daysi @edinsonsalinas @jhandry @migaherr @nadiamish @santiago323 @angelfernandez1 @daltonbustan @jonathan494 @leonardo170 @steven_romero @typophyllum @yuleidyelizabethcastro @alexandragonzlez @gabo22 @george389 @itijiat_sandra @jennycuray @lilian_ulloa @mattclark72 @nicolay_atocha @pauly1 @rebegaona @selvadero @sfhualpa @andreazhunio @anisopteralili @brithompson @catherinelilijt @cesarg @dalton48 @davidvillamagua @elizabeth1156 @felipeserrano @fespinozadej @jdrobe @johana_saritama @jorge429 @juan_alfredogonzalez @kaflorest @kurtaraluca @lonercalva @mao_xavier @miparadise @nelsonortiz @yostin_ruiz

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Para saber mais informações sobre este evento, visite nosso site em Great Southern Bioblitz

Compartilhe nas redes sociais #GSBioblitz #GSB2021

Previous events:
Great Southern Bioblitz 2020 Umbrella
Check out this summary blog about the 2020 Great Southern Bioblitz 'Great Southern Bioblitz - Amazing First Year!' by Pete Crowcroft (AKA @possumpete )

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Great Southern BioBlitz 2021 -


Posted on October 16, 2021 11:46 by stephen169 stephen169 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

GREAT SOUTHERN BIOBLITZ CHALLENGE THREE #SHAKEATREE

Sunday 24th October
Find Something New
Spread a white sheet under a tree branch.
Give the branch a shake, what falls out?
Great activity to do with kids big & small !!

@williamsmoths @reedmetz @silversea_starsong @w_martin @jeff_melvaine @kristy50 @lorrainecphelan @spacegecko @jeff_melvaine @melwood @angem @aldopenbrook @geelong-nature-nerd @grace_sibley @michael1922 @crimsonwookiee @garry34 @talus1972 @russellbest @martinlagerwey @abaddon @jansutton @russell115 @thunder-child @reiner @torhek @wanderingandwilderness @slsfirefight @andill @andrew_allen @boykett @edted @sanguinedragonflye @blaise_o @ernewton @kenharris @nickstando @kb_3550 @lachieforbes @tayloab @dangernoodlec137 @mickramsey @kerriej @melissa-morrison @nicolekearney @al1 @jasonmcc @parksvictoria @raggedeagle @rbshe @elusiveorchids @jdagg @lurlzz @rogstanden @chrisclarke25 @indrabone @jarrad1 @jdcamilleri82 @jmpriest5 @joy20 @kg140 @lenkaschirmer @marie_bonne @noseymosey @psycore @stemstemmer @andyfrank @aspacelobster @aussiecreature @blaise_o_leary @claedo @isabella150 @johnlenagan @nomesdoak @ohlincha @owenlishmund @philippe314 @rebekaaah @rubyredtuesday @alanam @blai @carly1988 @dancg @deluxe @elainewilliams @georectified @homegrown3556 @jessicaloulawrence @jessie208 @johnireland @marsusram @raimiller97 @saprosbro @tleitch @acwright @adamaus @amba @andrewacton @ashplantwitch @aussiebleeder @beau_meister @benanna @calamanthus @carranya @catloverdovey @chrislindorff @cveld @danielashdown @duke_n @eamw @eileen64 @elisabethshapiro @graemelunt @johnboy @jtee @kathrynstan @manderson80 @marika454 @mason87 @mattronsh @nicole07070707 @regnans @scootacamerons @stanley8m @warramaba @abirm @adindris @alisonwatson @ambikab @andrew1434 @anita379 @annz_ @arthur296 @awiddis @ayesha @billelder @bio327 @birdie-buddy @brandle @brendonwhitmore @brigid13 @bunyip @cap @cassie163 @cathal1 @chandes @clarkey @cmnoel @craig66 @david-francis44 @dfraser85 @eliap @emma1115 @ethan_lee @fatdentist @gabriel_tillman @gecko9 @gemma74 @georgina_goddard @gracinda1 @hamster1067 @heritagefutures @jagos @jameskdouch @jarrod30 @jess446 @jessica_laura

Posted on October 16, 2021 08:15 by aldopenbrook aldopenbrook | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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