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Red Soldier Beetles

These beetles have been showing up in a number of farms around Vancouver Island over the last couple weeks. They are a beneficial insect! The adults eat pollen, nectar, and also aphids, and the larva eat soil dwelling pests such as slug and snails.
They can be recognized by their long red body. The hard outer wings are held close to the body, and have black tips at the end.
The adults will aggregate in large numbers to feed and mate on open flowers. So far, we have seen then in parsley, cilantro, and pearly everlasting.

© prairiegirlgonecoastal

Have you seen this beneficial? What plants are you finding it on? Please add your observations to our project!

Posted on July 27, 2021 20:32 by bzand bzand | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Summertime at CEWC- free program opportunity too

As we begin into August many of the woody plants begin to show their fruit and seeds. Now is a great time to snap photos. It is also a great time for beginning and budding naturalists to observe and note our woody plants. Leaves and fruits are some of the key features of some of the species found around here.

We also will be hosting a free citizen science & iNaturalist family public program to help get new observers to join our project. On August 14, 2021 from 10am-12pm we will take a guided journey on one of our trails to get many observers out spotting the woody plants . The class will learn about iNaturalist features to our project and how to record your observations for CEWC’s page. Please bring your iPad, iPhone or tablet. All ages welcome. You can register online here: https://georgiawildlife.doubleknot.com/openrosters/ViewActivitySpaceAvailable.aspx?OrgKey=4371&CategoryID=24534

Posted on July 27, 2021 20:17 by wildbarrow15 wildbarrow15 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Observation of the week – July 17-23, 2021

The eleventh observation of the week comes from Peeter (@peeterinclarkson) who spotted this lovely Red Admiral.

If you have been following our OOTW since the project began in 2019, you may remember we first wrote about the Red Admiral and its booming population. At the end of our 2019 project, the Red Admiral was the second most observed butterfly with 107 observations. This year, the once reigning Red Admiral isn’t even in our top ten list – its currently at a rank of sixteen with 29 observations. How interesting is that?

Although it is well known as a species that has occasional ‘big years’, the reason for the population fluctuations of the Red Admiral still has some scientists scratching their heads. Red Admirals spend the winter in the southern United States, and some migrate back to Canada in the spring. The number of new butterflies produced in southern U.S., and the number that migrate north are influenced by a variety of factors. Ideal environmental conditions, including mild winters and early spring, may play a key role.

In a warm and early spring, Red Admirals migrate earlier and feed on early blooming plants in moist meadows and woodlands. If you see Red Admirals feeding in these places, you may want to reconsider approaching as they have been known to be territorial. They have been observed chasing other butterflies, birds and even people! If that’s not enough to keep you away their caterpillars feed on plants in the nettle family, which have sharp thorn-like hairs.

Peeter is a volunteer photographer with the Blooming Boulevards pollinator program in Mississauga, and has recently become interested in butterflies as part of this work. He shares: “I am a retired Professor of Medicine who is developing an interest in butterflies as a complement to my fascination with native plants. The iNaturalist site and the Butterfly Blitz have been a godsend to a novice like me in helping to identify the butterflies that my lens captures”.

Peeter spotted this lovely Red Admiral at a local park that is a popular spot for butterfly observations: "The Red Admiral was photographed at the Riverwood Conservancy while calmly gathering nectar on a cluster of coneflowers. The butterfly was extremely cooperative in posing for my 210 mm macro lens.”.

Thank you Peeter for being such an active observer to our project. We are so happy to hear that you have embraced this newfound appreciation for butterflies! Hopefully in a favourable year when conditions are just right, you will be able to experience a population boom of Red Admirals.

Have any of you noticed other butterfly species with good years and bad years?

Post written by Lily Vuong (@lilyvuong), Crew Leader, Community Outreach

Posted on July 27, 2021 19:33 by lltimms lltimms | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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A Naturalist in Trinidad and Tobago Spots a Black-veined Hairstreak in her Backyard - Observation of the Week, 7/27/21

Our Observation of the Week is the first Black-veined Hairstreak (Atlides polybe) posted from Trinidad and Tobago! Seen by @sheneller.

“I’ve been working from home due to the pandemic, which has been very stressful,” says Shenelle Ramkhelawan, an engineer living in Trinidad and Tobago. 

During my lunch breaks I like to go for walks in my backyard for fresh air. I saw a dragonfly perched on a branch and on my way to take its photograph, I saw a red dot under my pomerac tree. Upon closer observation, I noticed it was a stunning butterfly. I took photos of it and soon my dogs gathered around me. To save it from being trampled by my dogs, I gently placed my hand in front of it and it easily jumped onto my hand. It was very calm and didn’t fly away. I placed it on a tree and took more photos. This was the first butterfly I interacted with that was very calm and didn’t seem to fear me.

The butterfly Shenelle photographed was of course the black-veined hairstreak you see above. This species ranges from Mexico down through Argentina, but this is the first observation of one on any Caribbean island posted to iNaturalist. Like many other hairstreaks, it has “tails” extending from its hindwings. 

“Although I am an engineer by profession,” says Shenelle (above), 

I enjoy spending time in nature as a hobby. I enjoy going to beaches, hiking to waterfalls, and adventuring in the rainforest. I love being in nature as it helps me to self-reflect, heal and escape from the stresses of life. It helps me to remember that my problems aren’t as big as they seem.  

A friend of mine introduced me to iNaturalist. At first, I used it as my way of sharing my finds with my friend. Since then, it has evolved into a hobby and an escape. After joining iNaturalist, my perspective of my surroundings has changed. iNaturalist has a very friendly and well-educated community that truly cares and values nature. With their help, I am now more cognizant and knowledgeable of the fauna around me. iNaturalist helps me gain an appreciation for nature and learn to be kinder to my environment.

Most of my photos are taken in my backyard. If I am able to observe such beautiful species in my backyard, imagine what lies beyond.


- A big thanks to @brystrange for letting me know about this observation!

- Last year we featured another iNatter from Trinidad and Tobago, @zakwildlife, in an Observation of the Week post!

- There are over 115k hairstreak obervations on iNaturalist, check ‘em out!

Posted on July 27, 2021 19:21 by tiwane tiwane | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Género Isepeolus de Chile de acuerdo al Catalogo de Abejas Nativas de Chile del Ministerio de Medio Ambiente

De acuerdo al Catastro Abejas de Chile Actualizado al 29 Abril 2020 del Ministerio de Medio AMbiente de Chile (MMA), el género Isepeolus está compuesto por siete especies que son las siguientes:

  • Isepeolus atripilis (Roig-alsina,1991) Chile en la región de Magallanes.
  • Isepeolus cortesi (Toro y Rojas, 1968) Chile en las regiones de Valparaíso, Metropolitana, O’Higgins, Maule, Ñuble, Biobío, La Araucanía.
  • Isepeolus lativalvis (Friese, 1908) Chile en las regiones de Valparaíso, Metropolitana, O’Higgins, Maule, Ñuble, Biobío, La Araucanía.
  • Isepeolus luctuosus (Spinola, 1851) Chile en las regiones de Atacama, Coquimbo Valparaíso, Metropolitana, O’Higgins, Maule, Ñuble, Biobío, La Araucanía.
  • Isepeolus septemnotatus (Spinola, 1851) Chile en las regiones de Valparaíso, Metropolitana, O’Higgins, Maule, Ñuble, Biobío, La Araucanía.
  • Isepeolus vachali (Jörgensen, 1912) Chile en las regiones de Atacama, Coquimbo Valparaíso, Metropolitana, O’Higgins
  • Isepeolus wagenknechti (Toro y Rojas, 1968) Chile en las regiones de Atacama, Coquimbo Valparaíso, Metropolitana, O’Higgins

    En Inat existen dos de ellas identificadas al (27/07/21) que son:

  • (I. luctuosus) : https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/787055-Isepeolus-luctuosus
  • (I. septemnotatus): https://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/780157-Isepeolus-septemnotatus

En la base de imágenes de especies de BOLD hay otras: http://v3.boldsystems.org/index.php/Taxbrowser_Taxonpage?taxid=7228

Posted on July 27, 2021 18:41 by orlandomontes orlandomontes
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Over 13,000 observations and 2,700 species in just one month!


Great Job BioBlitzers!

With tremendous participation from more than 500 community members who contributed as observers or identifiers between June 25 and July 24, 2021, we documented over 13,000 observations spanning over 2,700 species in just a month. This bioblitz was an incredible experience!

Our goal was to safely document the biodiversity in South India during June/July to help us get familiar with plants, animals, and fungi in our very own backyards, gardens, or neighborhoods during this season. This activity, in turn, helps generate data that scientists can use in conservation and research and enables the creation of better field guides for naturalists.

We aimed high - over 5,000 observations covering a minimum of 1500 species. We not only met our goals but wildly exceeded them!

Hopefully, everyone had fun bioblitzing safely, and the event offered comfort and distraction through immersion in nature during the pandemic. Thank you all for this fantastic community work and for signing up to volunteer!

Take care of yourselves and stay safe!


Special shout-out to the following participants for their outstanding contributions to the 2021 South India Backyard Bioblitz!


Overall - most observations and species: @hive
Overall - most observations (2nd): @navaneethsinigeorge
Overall - most species (2nd): @sreenivasan

Andaman and Nicobar - most observations and species: @neelam2
Andhra Pradesh - most observations and species: @rajabandi
Karnataka - most observations and species: @subbu107
Kerala - most observations and species: @hive
Tamil Nadu - most observations: @dhrish_krish
Tamil Nadu - most species: @paulmathi
Telangana - most observations: @odonut
Telangana - most species: @surabhi_srivastava_gaur

-Ashwin
Posted on July 27, 2021 18:08 by orfrigatebird orfrigatebird
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Seeds To Be Collecting Now

This year with the drought it seems like many native plants are putting energy in to flowering and setting seed early. Are you seeing this? Plants like violets, golden alexanders, fox sedge, Canada vetch, baptisia, and Willowherbs all have maturing seed pods that are about ready if not ready for harvest so check your plants often. Fringed Willowherb dispersing seed can be seen here https://photos.app.goo.gl/GyB34gmcxdfu3rs28.

Posted on July 27, 2021 17:25 by dmlamm dmlamm | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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21 Roots Farm Scouting.

MNSEED collaborators were out to 21 Roots Farm to scout out what was blooming on a Sunday afternoon. Check out the photos here (https://photos.app.goo.gl/rbWYHikTuDe9mZh28). Stay tuned for the MNSEED gathering date and time! We're so excited that we'll be here!

Posted on July 27, 2021 17:16 by dmlamm dmlamm | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Welcome

BioBlitzers!! Excited to have you all explore your local area and identify the life that you share that space with. I encourage you to add to this journal as we progress throughout the Fall. Share your comments, issues, successes, questions, etc. Everything we add will likely benefit the group so do your best to contribute and participate.

Posted on July 27, 2021 16:57 by mr_rick mr_rick | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Needle Rust Fungi

Orange-tipped trees? Rust fungi are coming out in full force this July, bolstered by the wet June weather. Many rusts have multiple host plants & 5 annual spore stages! Trees can tolerate needle rust damage. Learn more at https://bit.ly/2TpnzrI #ForestHealth #AlaskaForestHealth

Posted on July 27, 2021 16:15 by awenninger awenninger | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Le Bombardier escopette

Les Bombardiers sont de petits (un peu plus de 6 mm) insectes de la famille des Carabes. L'espèce que l'on rencontre dans le Paillon est le Bombardier escopette, Brachinus sclopeta, reconnaissable à la tache orange entre ses élytres.

L'escopette est le nom d'une ancienne arme à feu, ancêtre de l'arquebuse. Les Bombardiers, en effet, doivent leur nom à une particularité étonnante : de nombreuses espèces de Carabiques sont capables de projeter un liquide, nauséabond ou corrosif, pour se défendre en cas d'agression, mais chez les Bombardiers, cette particularité est poussée un peu plus loin. En effet, ils projettent sur leur agresseur non pas une, mais deux substances : une glande produit de l'hydroquinone, et l'autre, du peroxyde d'hydrogène. Juste avant d'être projetés sur l'ennemi, les deux substances sont mélangées dans un organe spécial, où, en présence d'enzymes spécifiques, se produit une réaction chimique, qui entraîne une explosion, et la projection d'un aérosol corrosif à plus de 100°C.

Posted on July 27, 2021 16:07 by fabienpiednoir fabienpiednoir | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Gazing at Glassworts - August Ecoquest

Inspired by the glass show currently on display at the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens, In Dialogue with Nature: Glass in the Gardens, we are highlighting Salicornia, a genus of plants also known as glassworts, pickleweed, samphire, and saltwort, for our EcoQuest in August 2021. Salicornia are small halophytic species in the Amaranthaceae family. These plants are found along the beaches, salt marshes, and mangrove ecosystems of North America, Europe, South Africa, and South Asia. These small annual or perennial herbs grow prostrate or erect with simple hairless and, succulent, stems that appear jointed. Their stems vary from red to green and their leaves are reduced to small fleshy scales. Flowers are small, complex, and bisexual. They produce small fleshy fruits with a single seed.

There are a variety of uses for glassworts, including glassmaking! The ashes of the dried, burnt plants contain copious amounts of potash and soda ash and were historically used to manufacture glass and soap. In addition, this salty plant is eaten raw, pickled, or cooked; the seeds are used to make oil; and the plant is used as a biofilter for marine effluent.

There are about 30 species of Salicornia and the two native species that are found in Sarasota and Manatee Counties are Salicornia ambigua and S. bigelovii. If you are interested in seeing this unique species and would like to observe it in its natural habitats, please join our upcoming BioBlitz at Terra Ceia State Park on August 27th by registering with the event link below or go on your own hunt and share your findings through the iNaturalist project site. While you are out there, please photograph other salt march species as well. Happy glass gazing!

August BioBlitz Registration:
This hike will tentatively be 3 miles from 8AM to 11AM so be prepared!
https://7082.blackbaudhosting.com/7082/BioBlitz---Gazing-at-Glassworts

Posted on July 27, 2021 14:25 by sarasota_manatee_ecoflora_sean sarasota_manatee_ecoflora_sean | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Welcome to the Agassiz Dunes SNA Pasque Flower Unit Self-guided Bioblitz!

Welcome to Agassiz Dunes SNA Pasque Flower Unit Self-guided Bioblitz 2021! We’re excited to have your help recording the biodiversity of this site and welcome observations of all taxa. Please take some time to read the information below before visiting the SNA to make observations. To learn more about Minnesota Scientific and Natural Areas, check out the website and visiting guidelines!. For more information on how to use iNaturalist, check out this video tutorial from SNA naturalist, Arika Preas. And don’t forget to spread the word, using #SNABioBlitz2021!

Keep in mind, this is a self-guided Bioblitz, which allows individuals and household groups to get outside and contribute to citizen science while practicing safe social distancing. See more information on the DNR Response to COVID-19.

Visiting the Agassiz Dunes Pasque Flower Unit to make observations, Know Before You Go:

o Visiting guidelines and rules for this site: Scientific and Natural Areas belong to us all; treat them with care. They protect the last remaining habitat for Minnesota's rarest plants and animals. Recreation is limited to protect this habitat and natural diversity.

o Be light on the land: don’t litter, don’t disturb wildlife, and don’t pick or collect any natural features. Leave only footprints, take only photos!

o Follow all site rules. Allowed: bird and wildlife watching, hiking, photography. Not allowed: Dogs, foraging, motorized vehicles, biking, camping. See the full list of rules on our webpage.

o Be aware that this site does not have any maintained trails or facilities and plan accordingly.

o From the south side of Fertile, MN, drive south 1 mile on Hwy 32 to 450th St SW. Turn west onto 450th St. SW and drive 2 miles to 130th Ave. Turn north on 130 Ave. and drive 3/4 mile north to where the road turns west. The Pasque Flower Unit is immediately northeast of the corner. Park along shoulder of gravel road. Coordinates: 47°31'36.39"N 96°19'13.73"W. Google Maps Directions

o What to bring and wear:

Dress for the weather, and also to prevent tick bites and poison ivy contact (wear long sleeves and long
pants tucked into socks, wear lightly colored clothing to spot ticks more easily)

Snacks and water
A hand lens, binoculars, a notebook, field guides, anything you like to use to observe!
Sun screen, bug spray, a hat
A boot brush, if you have one, to clean off your boots before and after your visit to prevent the spread of invasive species

Have questions or want more information? Email Alex Miller, SNA Volunteer Outreach Specialist, at alex.miller@state.mn.us.

Posted on July 27, 2021 12:47 by minnesota_scientific_and_natural_areas minnesota_scientific_and_natural_areas | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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Expanding Flower-Visiting Wasps Project

Hi iNaturalist wasp community!

This project has provided great insight into the association/interaction between wasps and flowers in North America (Canada & US). Indeed, this project has grabbed the attention of UK based project - Big Wasp Survey (BWS) – as it aligns with their existing citizen science project to study wasps as pollinators.

Pollination is just one of the many useful ecosystem services wasps provide. But we don’t know much about which flowers benefit from wasp pollination, or which wasps are most important as pollinators. So, working with the BWS team we are aiming to expand the geographical scope of this project to global observations, to discover more wasp-flower interactions/associations.

The name of the project will change (to Flower Visiting Wasps of the World) to accommodate global observations, but don’t worry other requirements will not. We’re interested in any wasps that you may find visiting flowers: parasitoids, solitary and social. The observation field “Name of associated plant” is required, and note that macrophotography may make it hard to identify the plant species. Please make sure to include the full wasp and flower in the picture.

All observations that have been added previously to the project will remain. Project members will now be able to add their own observations outside of North America (Canada & US), as well as adding other iNaturalist members’ observations.

We hope that you will join us on this journey to identify wasp-flower interactions/associations around the world, helping us study wasps as pollinators.

Please feel free to share this journal post and project so that we can reach a wider community.

More information on Big Wasp Survey:
Website: https://www.bigwaspsurvey.org/
BWS Twitter: @bigwaspsurvey
Email: info@bigwaspsurvey.org

Posted on July 27, 2021 09:54 by seirian seirian | 1 comment | Leave a comment
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Moth Week Competition 2021 - Announcement of Winners

It has been a progressive National Moth Week with 390 observations uploaded by 13 observers and over 100 species. Two contributors surpassing over 100 records.

The Winner of 2021 National Moth Week Competition is @chathuri_jayatissa
She has recorded 126 Observations and 106 different species.
Congratulations Chathuri !!!🏆🏆🏆

Runner up is @chathura_udayanga with 106 Observations and 96 different species.

Third place goes to @sasandulasithminaperera with 59 observations and 57 different species.

A copy of my book (A handbook to Moths of Sri Lanka vol.1 ) will be given to three highest species observers - Chathuri Jayathissa, Chathura Udayanga and Sithmina Perera as an appreciation for their contribution and effort.

Many thanks to everyone who participated!

Posted on July 27, 2021 08:36 by nuwan nuwan | 3 comments | Leave a comment
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Bravo à tous : en juillet 2021, 10 000 observations partagées depuis la création du projet il ya un an

Le projet Biodiversité du Sistre et environs couvre le vallon et son torrent éponymes et les zones avoisinantes au sud du Mont Lozère ainsi que les causses calcaires proches.

Les observations de plus de 1 300 espèces ont été partagées et permettent de mieux percevoir ce point chaud local de biodiversité grâce aux plus de 200 observateurs et à près de 700 identificateurs. Les espèces animales les plus partagées sont des oiseaux communs tels le Rouge-gorge, le Pinson des arbres ou le Merle noir, d'autres moins répandus comme le bruant jaune, le Vautour fauve ou le Faucon crécerelle. Pour les plantes ce sont des orchidées, la montagnarde Orchis sureau, l'Orchis bouffon ou la Platanthère verdâtre.

Des espèces d'intérêts patrimoniales ou rares sont aussi observées parfois avec une fréquence exceptionnelle en France ou même en Europe de l'ouest (orchidées, rapaces). Ainsi sont notées les plus grandes populations mondiales d'Ophrys d'Aymonin, ainsi que les concentrations estivales les plus importantes connues de Faucons crécerellettes pour la France ou, assez fréquemment des espèces habituellement rares, comme la Spiranthe d'été ou le Bruant ortolan ainsi que de nombreuses espèces d'orchidées, de rapaces et de reptiles.

Des évolutions nouvelles sont déjà notées comme l'extension progressive de nouvelles espèces remontant vers le nord, comme par exemple le Lézard ocellé ou l'Orchis géant, non seulement dans les vallées mais aussi respectivement à 700 m et plus de 900 m d'altitude dans le vallon du Sistre.

Ces observations sont utiles pour la connaissance et déjà utilisées pour des actions de conservation (pour le recul de la période de fauchage des bords de routes) en lien avec un autre projet iNaturalist, Abiome.
N'hésitez donc pas à continuer à partager vos observations et à profiter de ce riche environnement.

Posted on July 27, 2021 08:34 by chacled chacled | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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A kind of boring July.

...I thought I submitted this, I might have lost it?

Anyway, July has been a pretty boring month, observation wise. Not a lot of trips very far, at least not ones with a lot of observing. It has been really hot, and it has sapped my energy.

I am hoping to get more interesting things done in August.

Its also ironic that all through the dreary long Decembers here, I was waiting for these long hours of daylight. But now that they are here...well, I am too tired to do anything.

But even though most of my observing has been in a neighborhood park, I still feel I am learning a thing or two. Mostly about bees.

Posted on July 27, 2021 08:18 by mnharris mnharris | 2 comments | Leave a comment
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189- ecologie van het strand

https://www.soortennl.nl/Portals/5/Linkoverzicht%20cursus_1.pdf

[Lezing] Plantengallen Matthijs Courbois

[Lezing] Plantengallen Matthijs Courbois
Op 23 februari ging de wekelijkse online lezing op donderdag over Plantengallen. Plantengallen zijn vervormingen in planten die veroorzaakt worden door insecten, andere beestjes en soms ook schimmels. Het is een vrij onbekende groep die makkelijk te herkennen zijn. Plantengallen vertellen veel over de biodiversiteit in een gebied. Matthijs Courbois leerde ons de basis van deze soortgroep. Hij vertelt hoe je ze kan herkennen en vinden, hoe ze ontstaan, en ook belangrijk, wat geen plantengallen zijn.
Onderstaand nog een aantal bronnen die interessant zijn als je meer over plantgallen wil leren.

189- ecologie van het strand
  • https://www.soortennl.nl/Portals/5/Linkoverzicht%20cursus_1.pdf
  • [Lezing] Plantengallen Matthijs Courbois

    [Lezing] Plantengallen Matthijs Courbois
    Op 23 februari ging de wekelijkse online lezing op donderdag over Plantengallen. Plantengallen zijn vervormingen in planten die veroorzaakt worden door insecten, andere beestjes en soms ook schimmels. Het is een vrij onbekende groep die makkelijk te herkennen zijn. Plantengallen vertellen veel over de biodiversiteit in een gebied. Matthijs Courbois leerde ons de basis van deze soortgroep. Hij vertelt hoe je ze kan herkennen en vinden, hoe ze ontstaan, en ook belangrijk, wat geen plantengallen zijn.
    Onderstaand nog een aantal bronnen die interessant zijn als je meer over plantgallen wil leren.

  • De aankondiging van de lezing met nog wat meer achtergrondinformatie:

    "Als je op excursie graag een Aardbeiklaver wilt zien, zoek je niet in het bos. En wie wel eens met de Sjoc meegaat weet dat je Beenbreek en Brandnetel niet snel naast elkaar zal zien staan. Als je wat langer naar planten kijkt valt het je al snel op dat sommige planten vaak samen voorkomen. Dit noemen we plantengemeenschappen. Deze plantengemeenschappen kan je beter bekijken door een vegetatieopname te maken, waarbij je in een proefvlak opschrijft hoeveel elke soort daar voorkomt. Maar waarom zou je dat willen? Daar gaat Joop Schaminée, hoogleraar vegetatie ecologie bij Wageningen University and Research, ons vanavond alles over vertellen. Elke plantengemeenschap is specifiek voor een bepaalde omgeving, dus als je eenmaal leert om naar groepen planten te kijken kan je de natuur om je heen steeds beter gaan begrijpen."


  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ru-WQDGRTI&t=17s
    https://www.mycologen.nl/actueel/nieuws/basiscursus-veldbiologie/


  • Power to the Paling Prijs Webinar (24 juni 2021)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K-IOUL88sV4


  • https://app.nlziet.nl/kijk-later

  • https://www.arte.tv/de/videos/046531-000-A/the-doors-when-you-re-strange/

  • STRATEGIE VOOR ENERGIE #2 - RES Nieuwe bronnen
    Om klimaatdoelstellingen te halen moeten we in 2030 35 TwH opwekken op land. De regionale energiestrategie biedt perspectief om deze opgave te halen. We denken dan vaak aan draaiende windmolens of glinsterende zonnepanelen, maar technische en ontwerp innovaties gaan snel. Waar

    kunnen we op rekenen tot 2030? Welke innovaties moeten we in de gaten houden? Kunnen zonnepanelen in meubilair genoeg opwekken aan de grote energiebehoefte te voldoen? In dit programma kijken we vooruit naar 2030 en bieden we vergezichten voor de toekomst. Hoe wekken we onze energie duurzaam op in 2050?
    STRATEGIE VOOR ENERGIE #2 - RES Nieuwe bronnen


  • Je hebt bijna geen opslagruimte meer voor je Gmail-account

    https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/#quota
    Je hebt bijna geen opslagruimte meer voor je Gmail-account
    https://one.google.com/storage/management?utm_source=g1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=storage&utm_content=non_g1_gmail_aoos_95_smui
    https://one.google.com/storage/management?utm_source=g1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=storage&utm_content=non_g1_gmail_aoos_95_smui
    https://one.google.com/storage/management?utm_source=g1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=storage&utm_content=non_g1_gmail_aoos_95_smui
    https://one.google.com/storage/management?utm_source=g1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=storage&utm_content=non_g1_gmail_aoos_95_smui


  • weekdier fauna ipv kreeftachtigen
    Op 28 januari heeft Valerie Reijers, kust ecoloog en onderzoeker aan de Universiteit Utrecht, een online lezing gehouden over de ecologie van het strand. Dit is de opname van het verhaal.

    weekdier fauna ipv kreeftachtigen

  • "Online lezing eikapsels en kreeftachtigen "
    Arie Twigt vertelt over de eikapsels van Roggen en Haaien die te vinden zijn langs de Nederlandse Kust en Peter Huwae vertelt over een aantal groepen kreeftachtigen die wat minder bekend zijn bij het brede publiek.

    "Online lezing eikapsels en kreeftachtigen "
    De NJN geeft in coronatijd iedere donderdag om 20:00 een lezing over uiteenlopende onderwerpen gerelateerd aan de natuur. Kom jij ook eens mee op kamp?

    Online lezing eikapsels en kreeftachtigen

  • Online lezing vleermuizen

    Online lezing vleermuizen
    In lijn met eerdere lezingen over zoogdieren is hier een lezing over de op één na meest diverse groep zoogdieren ter wereld, die ook in Nederland voorkomen. Als ZWG doen we veel met vleermuizen en dit jaar gaan we zelfs tijdens ons buitenlandkamp in Slowakije meedoen aan een onderzoek naar een vleermuissoort. Deze lezing is vrij algemeen. Waarschijnlijk volgt er binnenkort nog een extra lezing die meer ingaat op de (hand)kenmerken van individuele soorten.


  • https://app.nlziet.nl/kijk-later

  • https://www.arte.tv/de/videos/046531-000-A/the-doors-when-you-re-strange/

  • STRATEGIE VOOR ENERGIE #2 - RES Nieuwe bronnen
    Om klimaatdoelstellingen te halen moeten we in 2030 35 TwH opwekken op land. De regionale energiestrategie biedt perspectief om deze opgave te halen. We denken dan vaak aan draaiende windmolens of glinsterende zonnepanelen, maar technische en ontwerp innovaties gaan snel. Waar

    kunnen we op rekenen tot 2030? Welke innovaties moeten we in de gaten houden? Kunnen zonnepanelen in meubilair genoeg opwekken aan de grote energiebehoefte te voldoen? In dit programma kijken we vooruit naar 2030 en bieden we vergezichten voor de toekomst. Hoe wekken we onze energie duurzaam op in 2050?
    STRATEGIE VOOR ENERGIE #2 - RES Nieuwe bronnen


  • Je hebt bijna geen opslagruimte meer voor je Gmail-account

    https://drive.google.com/drive/u/0/#quota
    Je hebt bijna geen opslagruimte meer voor je Gmail-account
    https://one.google.com/storage/management?utm_source=g1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=storage&utm_content=non_g1_gmail_aoos_95_smui
    https://one.google.com/storage/management?utm_source=g1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=storage&utm_content=non_g1_gmail_aoos_95_smui
    https://one.google.com/storage/management?utm_source=g1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=storage&utm_content=non_g1_gmail_aoos_95_smui
    https://one.google.com/storage/management?utm_source=g1&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=storage&utm_content=non_g1_gmail_aoos_95_smui


  • weekdier fauna ipv kreeftachtigen
    Op 28 januari heeft Valerie Reijers, kust ecoloog en onderzoeker aan de Universiteit Utrecht, een online lezing gehouden over de ecologie van het strand. Dit is de opname van het verhaal.

    weekdier fauna ipv kreeftachtigen

  • "Online lezing eikapsels en kreeftachtigen "
    Arie Twigt vertelt over de eikapsels van Roggen en Haaien die te vinden zijn langs de Nederlandse Kust en Peter Huwae vertelt over een aantal groepen kreeftachtigen die wat minder bekend zijn bij het brede publiek.

    "Online lezing eikapsels en kreeftachtigen "
    De NJN geeft in coronatijd iedere donderdag om 20:00 een lezing over uiteenlopende onderwerpen gerelateerd aan de natuur. Kom jij ook eens mee op kamp?

    Online lezing eikapsels en kreeftachtigen

  • Online lezing vleermuizen

    Online lezing vleermuizen
    In lijn met eerdere lezingen over zoogdieren is hier een lezing over de op één na meest diverse groep zoogdieren ter wereld, die ook in Nederland voorkomen. Als ZWG doen we veel met vleermuizen en dit jaar gaan we zelfs tijdens ons buitenlandkamp in Slowakije meedoen aan een onderzoek naar een vleermuissoort. Deze lezing is vrij algemeen. Waarschijnlijk volgt er binnenkort nog een extra lezing die meer ingaat op de (hand)kenmerken van individuele soorten.


  • https://sggroningen.nl/evenement/einsteins-droom
    Het is een gouden tijd voor zwaartekrachtsonderzoek. Pas nu, meer dan honderd jaar na de ontdekking van de relativiteitstheorie, zien we de volledige realisatie van Einsteins droom – hoe de oorsprong, samenstelling en toekomst van het heelal wordt bepaald door de meetkunde van ruimte en tijd. Recente technologie heeft vele nieuwe vensters in het onderzoek geopend, van de straling van de oerknal en zwaartekrachtsgolven tot de eerste foto van een zwart gat. Tegelijkertijd resteren er diepe, existentiële vragen over donkere materie, donkere energie en aard van ruimte en tijd op de allerkleinste schalen waar de quantumtheorie regeert. Zijn ruimte en tijd uiteindelijk niet meer dan een illusie? Meer informatie

  • https://sggroningen.nl/evenement/rode-wijn-goed-voor-het-hart?language_content_entity=und
    s Rode wijn gezond? Martijn Katan legt uit hoe complex voedingsadviezen zijn en hoe de voedingswetenschap zich kan vergissen. Matige drinkers leven langer dan geheelonthouders. Dat komt vooral doordat ze minder hartinfarcten krijgen. Mogelijke verklaringen daarvoor zijn:

    Alcohol verhoogt het ‘goede’ HDL cholesterol in het bloed.
    Alcohol remt misschien de vorming van bloedstolsels.
    Rode wijn bevat polyfenolen met anti-oxidantwerking.
    De laatste tijd rijzen er echter twijfels of meer alcohol drinken echt de kans op een hartinfarct verkleint. Het is namelijk onzeker geworden of HDL-cholesterol werkelijk goed is voor de bloedvaten, en anti-oxidanten blijken niets te doen voor de gezondheid. Belangrijker nog is dat geheel-onthouders niet alleen minder drinken maar gemiddeld ook lager opgeleid, armer, dikker en minder actief zijn en meer roken dan matige drinkers. Al die factoren verhogen de kans op hartaandoeningen. Er bestaan statistische https://p2gonew.serverspace.rug.nl/p2g/player/player.aspx?id=b4d1JR technieken die de verstrengeling van deze factoren met alcoholgebruik proberen te ontwarren, maar die technieken zijn minder effectief
    https://p2gonew.serverspace.rug.nl/p2g/player/player.aspx?id=b4d1JR
    dan vaak wordt aangenomen. Deze verstrengeling is een probleem in veel van het moderne voedingsonderzoek en het ondergraaft daarmee sommige voedingsadviezen. Een


  • https://www.kng-groningen.nl/
    https://www.kng-groningen.nl/programma-lezingen/
    https://www.facebook.com/Koninklijk-Natuurkundig-Genootschap-2266823803541766/

  • Wilde Argentina
    https://livetv.canaldigitaal.nl/asset/Ft1HDQMMuiyOnNNpTLBLxHnchl_4AhkPdLd9yiNq


  • Posted on July 27, 2021 07:26 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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    207-Land van Ons Kees Vlaar boekweit en insecten bij Onnen

    207-Land van Ons Kees Vlaar boekweit en insecten bij Onnen
    Boek van Beuk en Weit van Graan
    Twee jaar geleden stonden zijn kalveren er nog, laat veeboer Kees Vlaar uit Onnen in zijn fotoalbum zien. Nu heeft hij zijn grasakkers verkocht en bloeit er sinds kort drie hectare boekweit.

    De boekweit is vorige maand ingezaaid door Land van Ons. Dat is een burgercoöperatie die landbouwgrond van traditionele boerenbedrijven opkoopt om plaats te maken voor meer diverse en biologische landbouw. Landelijk heeft de beweging zo’n 15 duizend leden.

    Jan Wittenberg is actief betrokken bij de activiteiten van de coöperatie in Onnen. ‘Dit is een poging om de landbouw nieuw leven in te blazen. Kijk maar, het stikt hier van de bijen, zweefvliegen en vlinders. Het is een omkering van de vernietigende landbouwmethoden waar Nederlandse boeren in zijn beland,’ stelt Wittenberg.

    Een insect op een boekweitbloem (Foto: Bram Koster)

    Wittenberg doelt op het intensief houden van vee en verbouwen van gewassen met een maximale opbrengst als doel. Dat leidt tot de bekende afname in biodiversiteit en verhoogde uitstoot van broeikasgassen. Ook veroorzaakt het een bodem die straks volledig uitgeput en onbruikbaar is, zo was vorige week nog in televisieprogramma Zembla te zien.

     

    Waar nu boekweit bloeit, stond eerder het vee van Kees Vlaar (Foto: Bram Koster)

    GieselGeer

    Toch is het wel even slikken voor Kees Vlaar (64). Zijn leven lang is hij al veeboer. Het bedrijf aan de Gieselgeer in Onnen nam hij over van zijn vader, maar zijn eigen kinderen kiezen voor een andere carrière. Nu Kees op leeftijd raakt moet hij noodgedwongen afschalen.

    ‘Ik had hier een kleine veertig hectare. Daar is nou nog vijftien hectare van over.’ De rest is verkocht aan Land van Ons, vertelt Kees. Hij staat tussen het handjevol vleeskoeien dat hij nu nog heeft. Een kalf likt zijn elleboog. ‘Dit is een hele makke.’

    Kees Vlaar tussen zijn vleeskoeien (Foto: Bram Koster)

     

    In de verte is de boekweit te zien, op de plek waar vroeger nog meer gras en koeien van Kees stonden. ‘Ik zie liever mooi grasland dan boekweit. Dat geef ik wel toe. Grasland waar een paar mooie koeien lopen, daar ben ik mee opgegroeid, hè?’ Kees draait zich om en wijst richting de boekweit. ‘Maar dit heb natuurlijk ook wel wat. Op den duur.’

    Onkruid

    Kees’ twijfels vinden bijstand bij willekeurige passant Robert uit Onnen. ‘Voor mij is het onkruid wat ik zie. Ik vind het veld niet mooi.’

    Volgens coöperatielid Hans Beck, die ook even naar het veld is komen kijken, is dat een kwestie van onwetendheid. ‘Misschien ziet het er voor die man uit als onkruid, maar boekweit is een heel oud gewas. Het was vroeger één van de basisgranen voor pannenkoeken.’

    Honing met karakter

    De miljoenen Onnense boekweitbloemetjes zijn met hun nectar een belangrijke voedingsbron voor wilde insecten, maar om alles op tijd te bestuiven is assistentie nodig. Imker Elmar Mook uit Drenthe biedt soelaas.

     

    De bijenkasten staan naast het boekweitveld (Foto: Bram Koster)

     

    ‘Boekweit waar geen bijen bij geplaatst zijn, geeft maar een kwart van de opbrengst. Dat komt doordat elk bloemetje dat ’s ochtends open gaat diezelfde dag bestoven moet worden, anders vormt zich geen korreltje,’ zegt Mook.

    De zeven bijenkasten met tienduizenden bijen leveren straks potjes vol boekweithoning op, door de imker omschreven als een donkere honing met een sterke smaak. ‘Echt een honing met karakter.’

    Mozaïek

    Wie net als boer Kees een zwak heeft voor het Onnense grasland, heeft tot volgend jaar om ervan te genieten. Dan gaat de coöperatie aan de slag met de rest van de aangekochte weides. Wittenberg legt uit: ‘Wij gaan hier een mozaïek van verschillende gewassen met bloemrijke akkerlanden aanleggen. Zo verhogen we de biodiversiteit en versterken we het gezonde bodemleven.’

    Intensieve Landbouw WormenOnderzoeker

    Het boerenland is er slecht aan toe. Het gevolg van overmatig gebruik van kunstmest en bestrijdingsmiddelen, van steeds meer dieren en hoge opbrengsten per hectare.

    De intensieve landbouw heeft desastreuze gevolgen voor de bodemvruchtbaarheid. Wormen-onderzoeker Jeroen Onrust steekt zijn schop in het Friese maisland. Het resultaat: één schamele, kleine worm. “We zijn ontaard”, zegt voormalig veearts Kees Scheepens. Als we willen dat ook de generaties na ons nog te eten hebben, zal het systeem fundamenteel moeten veranderen. Maar boeren die willen omschakelen naar biologisch zeggen dat hun bank deze omschakeling frustreert
    https://www.nationaalpark-drents-friese-wold.nl/unieke-natuur/esdorpenlandschap-0
    https://www.oogtv.nl/2021/07/vernietigende-landbouw-maakt-plaats-voor-boekweit-en-insecten-bij-onnen/


    1. Webinar Theunis Piersma
    2. Webinar Bijen Belgie is nog steeds beschikbaar ipv de week
    3. Webinar Bijen KNNV
    4. Webinar Turtles PHD Wageningen Fee Smulders
    5. Webinar Drentse Aa Otters Cindy
    6. Webinar Tinallinge Thea Spek



      Currently when we submit a photo for computer vision classification, we resize the photo down to 299px on the long edge with Lanczos resampling. This is causing people to get some weirdly inaccurate results with the July 2021 model, we think because the new system performs a center crop of a 0.875x square, then resizes that square to 299x299 px with bilinear resampling, which means if we send an image that is 50x299px, it will actually get center cropped then upsampled to 299x299, and we'd be classifying on some interpolated pixels. Yaron and I also did some testing within the app and found that using bilinear resampling with Bitmap.createScaledBitmap actually got better results than using Lanczos, so it seems like even that resampling step can have some impact.

    So my recommendations for what kind of image we should submit are:

    Resize the image to 640px on the long edge (that will avoid the upsampling problem, and this is what the iPhone app does so that will add some consistency)
    Resize the image using bilinear resampling instead of Lanczos (though we should continue to use Lanczos on the image the user sees)


  • Wilde Argentina
    https://livetv.canaldigitaal.nl/asset/Ft1HDQMMuiyOnNNpTLBLxHnchl_4AhkPdLd9yiNq


  • 207-Land van Ons Kees Vlaar boekweit en insecten bij Onnen
    https://livetv.canaldigitaal.nl/asset/0izJS3mE5Q_J7yrBqPSZOQe-XF6ZVnXi6otyGySu
  • Posted on July 27, 2021 07:03 by ahospers ahospers | 0 comments | Leave a comment
    105837 icon thumb

    Week 7 Journal Post

    The marvelous photos and images taken of L.A. wildlife have been inspiring, and your participation is making all the difference. More than 10,000 observations have been made since the start of the challenge. Please continue to contribute your pictures of wild animals, insects and plants as well as any indicator species. When you’re out and about, here are a few yet to be identified: Coachwhip, canyon wren, and roadrunner. Keep up the truly great effort and thank you. #LABioBlitz and #LAPLNeiSci

    Posted on July 27, 2021 04:32 by wanderlustingviv wanderlustingviv | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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    Further thoughts on the caudal flag of the leopard

    In a recent Post (July 23, 2021), we discussed the possibility that the caudal flag of the leopard (Panthera pardus) is indirectly adaptive to a habitat in which its enemies, the lion (Panthera leo), the tiger (Panthera tigris) and/or the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta, see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rFubUfAFgM), are common.

    We saw that one way to test this is by comparison with similar felid species in faunas depauperate in carnivores larger than the leopard. And indeed the puma (Puma concolor) and the jaguar (Panthera onca) do lack any caudal flag.

    However, another test is possible in Sri Lanka, where a distinctive subspecies of the leopard (P. p. kotiya) is the top carnivore because of isolation on an island. The Sri Lankan leopard seldom bothers to hoist its prey into trees, eating on the ground.

    There are many clear photos on the Web from Sri Lanka, because the leopard is unusually bold here. And these do indeed seem to show that the caudal flag is poorly-expressed compared to the African (P. p. pardus) and Indian (P. p. fusca) subspecies. In Sri Lanka the white underside of the tail seems poorly developed (e.g. see the third photo in https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/41229003), and curling up of the tail-tip seems to be infrequent.

    The following video seems typical of the Sri Lankan subspecies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYO3obqi6H8. Compare it with these video from South Africa: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zB7IIc21q0 and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_risCBZtIgc.

    The following is also relevant to how the leopard manages its risk from superior carnivores in the African savannas.

    R D Estes (1991), in The Behavior Guide to African Mammals, pages 367-368, points out that "a barking terrier can easily tree a leopard by daylight, and one even gave way to a yapping jackal (Bertram 1974)...that an animal as well armed and powerful as a leopard would surrender its own kills to a single (brown) hyena is somewhat puzzling." Estes elaborates on page 332: "a lone female (brown hyena) robbed a male leopard of the springbok it had just killed and when the leopard tried to reclaim it, chased it up a tree (Owens and Owens 1978). Yet the same (hyena) species keeps at least 200 m from lions on kills and allows 1/2 hour after the lions leave before moving in (Owens and Owens 1978)".

    For proof that the leopard can be intimidated by a single brown hyena (Parahyaena brunnea), see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HW2OwVreINA.

    These two lines of evidence - that the caudal flag is poorly-expressed in the Sri Lankan leopard and that the African leopard sometimes gives in to inferior carnivores rather than risk attracting the lion or the spotted hyena - support the idea that the caudal flag signifies some sort of indirect appeasement.

    Posted on July 27, 2021 03:11 by milewski milewski | 1 comment | Leave a comment
    93706 icon thumb

    ID feature white cockatoos from Leeuwin Birding Blog

    The below article is from Leeuwin Birding Blog however it is without photos.

    To see the entire article with photos to assist with ID between Baudin's and Carnaby's click on the link at the bottom of the page.

    day, April 3, 2011

    ID Feature: White-tailed Black-Cockatoos

    Although recognised as distinct forms as long ago as 1933 (by none other than ornithologist Ivan Carnaby), Carnaby's (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) and Baudin's (C. baudinii) Black Cockatoos were only officially split by the first Christidis & Boles checklist in 1994 [1]. They are typically described in field guides as 'identical except for bill length', which can be unhelpful for birders who can't get a decent look at the upper mandible. We hope the following information is more useful!

    Bill Length (but don't forget width!)
    This is the obvious and defining difference between the two species, and reflects a difference in feeding habits. Baudin's use their very long mandible tips to carefully extract seeds from woody fruits (e.g. marri gumnuts), leaving little damage on the nut. Carnaby's tend to much more destructive and will chew the rim off marri nuts to access the seeds.

    A male Baudin's Black-Cockatoo carefully hooks the seeds out of a marri nut. Note the brownish tinge to plumage (see General Description below).

    Marri nuts after Baudin's Black-Cockatoos have been at work.

    By contrast, Carnaby's Black-Cockatoos use their shorter, but broad and powerful mandibles to tear woody fruits apart. Unlike the delicate feeding of Baudin's, Carnaby's must break the rim off marri nuts to extract the seed.

    Baudin's bills can be quite strikingly long and thin, hence the rule of thumb "if you only think it's long, it's probably a Carnaby's". However, an examination of multiple specimens in the WA Museum suggests there is variation in the length of the upper mandible tip in both species, and thus a small area of overlap. In fact, the more diagnostic feature of the bill is actually its width - hence Carnaby's gained the specific name latirostris for 'wide-nosed'. Seen from the front, Carnaby's have a broad, arched shape across the top of the bill, whereas Baudin's is more triangular and narrow. The best published illustration of the bills, from Johnstone & Storr [2], is reproduced in WA Bird Notes 89, p. 12 [6] - available online at http://www.birdsaustralia.com.au/the-organisation/wa-bird-notes.html.

    Carnaby's (left) and Baudin's (right) specimens on public display in the galleries of the Western Australian Museum. Note that the bill length of both species is variable (possibly due to wear), so that 'long-billed' Carnaby's can approach 'short-billed' Baudin's in bill length.

    The difference between bill width in Carnaby's (top) and Baudin's (bottom) is obvious from the front even if the mandible tip is hidden by feathers. Note the arch shape across the top of the Carnaby's bill, but more triangular or diamond shape of the Baudin's mandible.

    Call
    The standard line that "calls can be distinguished by experienced birders" seems to be written by people who could not, since they usually offer no further information! Visiting east coast birders should find the 'whee-orr' call of Carnaby's very close to that of the Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo, with which it has been treated as conspecific in the past.

    By comparison, the call of Baudin's is slightly, but noticeably different:

    • calls are shorter (0.47s vs. 0.64s for Carnaby's in Saunders' classic study [7]) and sound clipped compared to Carnaby's
    • the interval between repeat calls in a series is also shorter than in Carnaby's
    • there is less separation of the two 'syllables' of the call (i.e. wheeor, rather than whee-oor; Carnaby's may also stretch their calls to three syllables - i.e. we-EER-oor)
    • calls are more shrill and 'shrieky' on the first syllable, whereas Carnaby's tend to sound 'lazier'.
    Baudin's also have a more diverse repertoire of contact calls and whistles made while feeding, some of which are unique, partcularly a 'clucking' call. However, as always, take care when ID'ing by call as Baudin's can occasionally make Carnaby's-like calls and vice versa, so it's best to hear a few calls from the bird in question to confirm an ID. To help illustrate the differences in call, here is a short video (c. 4min) featuring calls from both species. More comparative audio is available at:
    • YouTube (great work by Don Kimball), see also another clip by Don featuring a group Carnaby's
    • Graeme Chapman's website (Carnaby's and Baudin's)
    • Xeno-Canto
    General Description Scientific texts such as Johnstone & Storr [2] have detailed, but quite literally word-for-word-identical plumage descriptions for the two species. Very few field guides offer any advance on "identical except for bill", but there do appear to be some subtle differences that may be useful, though not diagnostic.
    • Simpson & Day [3] pegs Baudin's as "smaller, browner", and many individuals certainly have a noticeable brownish sheen in strong light. Is it possible scientific descriptions have overlooked this feature while studying museum skins under artificial light?
    A group of Baudin's Black-Cockatoos. Note the brownish sheen visible in strong sunlight. Is this a helpful ID feature - possibly!
    • HANZAB [4] illustrates (but does not confirm in the text) the female Baudin's as having more extensive pale fringing on the breast and belly feathers than female Carnaby's
    • Dimensions are subtly different: measurements in Johnstone & Storr [2] show the total length as very similar, but show a slightly longer tail length (and thus by deduction, slightly shorter body length) for Baudin's: 256-295mm (mean 271mm) against 250-275mm (mean 265mm) in Carnaby's. While there's generally at most a centimetre in it, field impressions of a slightly shorter tail in Carnaby's are supported by the measurements. Similarly, Neil Hamilton (ex-curator of birds at Perth Zoo) is quoted as saying Carnaby's is distinct for its "stockier" body, and "longer appearance of the legs" [5].
    A female Baudin's Black-Cockatoo. Note the extensive grey fringes on the breast & neck feathers, and relatively long tail. Female Carnaby's are rarely this grey. Distribution Whilst both species form quite wide-ranging nomadic flocks in the period after the breeding season (i.e. late summer to winter), Baudin's are generally more predictable in their distribution. Essentially, Baudin's is a forest cockatoo and its heartland is the heavily forested south-west; unlike Carnaby's, it rarely enters the Wheatbelt proper. In the Perth area, Baudin's only rarely stray onto the coastal plain (except for the eastern most foothills), so the large autumn flocks seen in suburban Perth are almost exclusively Carnaby's. Only south of about Lake Clifton-Waroona are Baudin's likely to occur on the coastal plain. The autumn-winter incursions by Baudin's are instead focussed on the Darling Scarp, north to the vicinity of Mundaring. North of a line from Wanneroo to Toodyay, Carnaby's becomes by far the more likely candidate for black-cockatoo sightings, and this area is in fact one of their traditional strongholds. The Black-Cockatoo flocks seen around suburban Perth on the coastal plain (mostly in autumn-winter) are almost exclusively Carnaby's. Feeding Habits Both species feed regularly on Marri 'honkey nuts' (to use their local name), but Baudin's are far more reliant on them. They also feed on Bull Banksia (Banksia grandis), and pears and apples from orchards. Unfortunately, as a result of this, they are still shot illegally by some orchardists in some areas. Carnaby's eat a much wider range of seeds and flowers, including heathland Banksia, Hakea, and Grevillea species, and a wider range of eucalypt and sheok fruits. In the metropolitan area, they also feed on introduced species, particularly pines, but also on occasion liquadamber and almond nuts. Indeed, a good rule of thumb is that if it's feeding in a pine, it's almost certainly a Carnaby's, as this is one of their favoured foods on the coastal plain, whereas Baudin's have rarely, if ever, been recorded using them. Further, because of their more varied feeding strategy, Carnaby's are also more likely to be seen feeding in low scrub or on the ground, though Baudin's do sometimes descend to feed on Erodium or dropped nuts. Carnaby's are often seen feeding in surprisingly small shrubs. If it's feeding in a pine tree, it's almost certainly a Carnaby's! Finally, the usual word of caution - land clearing has progressively resulted in greater incursion of Carnaby's into the Jarrah-Marri forests of the south-west. In these areas, mixed flocks sometimes occur, so it pays to check carefully if in doubt. It would be remiss to end an article on these two species without mentioning their conservation. Both species are threatened in WA due to their low reproduction rates, habitat loss, and in the case case of Baudin's, shooting. Records of their habitat usage can be significant in protecting these species, and we encourage birders in the west to participate in surveys and counts of these species - see the Birds Australia Carnaby's Black-Cockatoo recovery project page for more information about what's being done and how you can get involved. The WA Conservation Council has also launched a web-based petition for black-cockatoo habitat protection. References [1] Christidis L. & Boles W. (1994) The Taxonomy and Species of Birds of Australia and its Territories. RAOU, Melbourne. [2] Johnstone R. & Storr G. (1998) Handbook of Western Australian Birds Volume 1: Non-passerines (Emu to Dollarbird). Western Australian Museum, Perth. [3] Simpson K. & Day N. (1993) Field Guide to Australian Birds 3rd Edition. Penguin Books, Australia. [4] eds. Higgins P.J. & Davies S.J.J.F (1999) Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic Birds Volume 4: Parrots to Dollarbird. Oxford University Press, Melbourne. [5] Chapman T. (2000) Cockies in Crisis. Western Australian Bird Notes 95, p. 9. [6] Burbidge A. & Johnstone R. (1999) Short-billed or Long-billed - which Black-Cockatoo? Western Australian Bird Notes 89, pp. 12-14. [7] Saunders D.A. (1979) The distribution and taxonomy of White-tailed and Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoos Calyptorhynchos spp. Emu 79, pp. 215-227. Further Information
    • WA Museum Fact Sheets for Baudin's and Carnaby's
    • Some food sources of both species here
      Posted by WA Birding Blog at 5:17 PM
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      Labels: Endemics, ID Features

    https://wabirdingblog.blogspot.com/2011/04/id-feature-white-tailed-black-cockatoos.html?fbclid=IwAR2omK58IvrXMhwojmRhc_reu-G3An38wte69lyGp9T1j6WoSqRVWtgTj-E

    Posted on July 27, 2021 02:06 by kezzza4 kezzza4 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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    CNC:NYC 2021 RESULTS (version 2)

    NOTE: I have recreated this post as close to what it was on the day results were announced (May 10, 2021), but since I was rewriting, I figured I might as well add some updated totals. Those are in italics. If you happen to have made a copy of that original post, I'd love to see it so I can figure out if I missed anything. Email it to citynaturechallengeNYC@gmail.com. THANKS!

    The City Nature Challenge 2021 results are in and they are very exciting!

    Global City Nature Challenge Results

    Globally, over 50K (54K) observers in 419 cities made 1.2 million observations! It’s the first time a CNC has broken the 1 million mark AND it’s the first time iNaturalist as a whole has had over 1 million observations in a week. Click here to see an infographic of the global results.

    New York's own Daniel Atha (@danielatha) was the top observer for the whole challenge! Check out his journal post, My Personal Experience of the City Nature Challenge.

    New York City CNC Results

    In NYC, we had the most observers EVER for CNC with 850 (883) people making over 19K observations. We found 1589 species in NYC and we thank 650 identifiers for their help in improving this list.

    On the morning results were announced, (9am May 10, 2021), these were the NYC leaderboards:

    Congrats to @danielatha, @srall, @cmurphy95, @klodonnell, @irag, @glyptostrob0ides, @nycnatureobserver, @matthew_wills, @elharo, and @aberkov for making the leaderboards!

    Emily Dickinson at the Madison Square Park Conservancy organized the NYC Park by Park Competition, which had 19 of the city's parks and greenspaces competing. Bronx Park won for most observations (4459) and species (348) and Green-Wood Cemetery won for most observers (59).


    We also brought back our Battle of the Boroughs! And in a first for a CNC, Manhattan didn't sweep all three categories! The most observations were made in the Bronx, the most species were found in Brooklyn, and the most people making observations were in Manhattan. Click the Battle of the Boroughs project link above to get to the individual borough projects. Here are the rankings as the stood on the morning of May 10, 2021:



    Here are our top observers and species finders in each borough:
    Brooklyn: @elharo (obs) and @matthew_wills (spp)
    Bronx: @danielatha
    Queens: @klodonnell
    Staten Island: @srall
    Manhattan: @aberkov

    Fun Finds

    This section might be missing a few entries from the original version. If you have exciting finds that I missed, please remind me of them in the comments!

    @desmodium_nyc found Birdfoot Violet (Viola pedata), a New York State endangered plant. LINK.

    @morgan2km found an Eastern Red Bat (Lasiurus borealis) snoozing in Prospect Park. LINK.

    @mayacrow found a Brotherly Ground Crab Spider, Xysticus fraternus, one of only 15 observations of this species in iNaturalist and a first for New York state. Thanks to @elharo for looking that up. LINK.

    @jholmes found an Ilia Underwing caterpillar (Catocala ilia) hangin out right in the middle of Broadway. LINK.

    A couple folks documented some exciting species interactions: @mayacrow documented a Great Blue Heron catching a Brown Bullhead on Staten Island and @kevparsonsproject documented a Great Egret catching an eel of some sort in Jamaica Bay.

    MANY THANKS

    We absolutely could not run a successful CNC:NYC without all of our partners: Madison Square Park Conservancy, Hudson River Parks Trust River Project, NYC Parks, NYBG, Greenbelt Conservancy, Genspace, Freshkills Park Alliance, Green-Wood Cemetery, WSP EcoProjects, Bronx River Alliance, LES Ecology Center, Randall's Island Park Alliance, Brooklyn Bridge Park Conservancy, Brooklyn Greenway Initiative, Alliance for Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Battery Park City Authority, Manhattan Land Trust, March for Science NYC, Latino Outdoors, and Brooklyn CNC captain, @xris. Thanks for coming to planning meetings, spreading the word about CNC, making your own observations and identifications, and many thanks especially to those of you who hosted or organized CNC related events this year. It was hard to organize events this year because of ongoing pandemic restrictions and we really appreciate your efforts!

    We also had some great Macaulay Honors College student volunteers who helped moderate and participate in our virtual events. Thanks to @anamariaoliynyk, @ziska_andrew, and especially @danielthomas, who has volunteered for CNC for four years in a row!


    The dates of the 2022 challenge have been set! Mark your calendars for April 29, 2022 - May 2, 2022. Join this project for updates in the late summer/early fall: City Nature Challenge: New York City 2022.

    Posted on July 26, 2021 23:16 by klodonnell klodonnell | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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    Invasive species of particular concern to stop NOW!

    Here are the species being tracked in this project. We will update if species are added or removed:

    Wavyleaf Basketgrass (Oplismenus undulatifolius )
    Italian Arum (Arum italicum)
    Asian Jumpseed (Persicaria filiformis)
    Incised Fumewort (Corydalis incisa)
    Castor-Aralia (Kalopanax septemlobus)
    Amur Corktree (Phellodendron amure..
    Two Horned Water Chestnut (Trapa bispinosa)
    Oriental False Hawksbeard (Youngia japonica)

    Posted on July 26, 2021 21:53 by tobes61 tobes61 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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    Effect of recent heat wave on Douglas-Fir on Highway 20 in the Cascade Range

    The unusually hot weather at the end of June had negative effects of people, plants, and other organisms. However, the damage was patchy. I documented the extent of damage to conifers along Highway 20 in Lincoln and Benton Counties, Oregon by driving the road and stopping to photograph plants, then uploading the photos to iNaturalist. Observation numbers, species, and results are results are listed below, along with the approximate location of the observations.

    No damage was observed close to the coast, but damage was obvious from a little west of Toledo to approximately the Lincoln/Benton County border. No obvious damage was observed east of there into the Willamette Valley at Corvallis. On some hillsides, nearly all the conifers appeared damaged, but that was not always the case.

    Damage consisted of dead young branches on the southwest (to west and south) side of trees. For that reason, it was not obvious when driving west toward Newport but was easily seen when driving east. The great majority of the damaged conifers were Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-Fir) because that is by far the most common conifer in the area, but damage was also seen on Thuja plicata (Western Red Cedar) and Tsuga heterophylla (Western Hemlock). Most deciduous trees appeared undamaged, although those Alnus rubra higher above waterways had lost upper leaves.

    The surprising result of this survey is that the conifers in the eastern Coast Range lacked obvious heat damage, while those in the western Coast Range (except very close to the coast) were damaged.

    Explanation of the table. Observations are sorted by species, then by location, west to east. The phrase "Heat damage" indicates that damage was photographed; if that phrase is lacking, heat damage was not observed. To visit an observation, insert the observation number (Obs_#) into the URL https://www.inaturalist.org/observations/88346965

    Obs_# scientific_name tag latitude longitude
    88333205 Picea sitchensis 44.63607995 -124.0328932
    88333208 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.63610385 -124.0323103
    88333894 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.63440526 -124.0187767
    88333895 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.63411399 -124.0183787
    88334894 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.63122203 -124.0063891
    88334896 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.6314221 -124.006172
    88334899 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.6315 -124.00662
    88335502 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.62938707 -123.9878988
    88335503 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.62832175 -123.985544
    88335943 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.62527 -123.98189
    88335944 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.62527 -123.98189
    88336330 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.62671 -123.9707
    88336331 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.62671 -123.9707
    88336332 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.62678233 -123.9706562
    88338291 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.62923 -123.96184
    88338293 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.630804 -123.9598403
    88339124 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.629454 -123.9550403
    88339125 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.629454 -123.9550403
    88339127 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.629454 -123.9550403
    88339131 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.629454 -123.9550403
    88346964 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6324318 -123.9474903
    88346965 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6324318 -123.9474903
    88347712 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.64085 -123.934
    88347713 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.64085 -123.934
    88348966 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.644036 -123.9240517
    88348969 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.644036 -123.9240517
    88348974 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.643964 -123.9247132
    88413571 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.646373 -123.9195653
    88413572 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.646318 -123.9194544
    88413574 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6471 -123.91927
    88413575 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6471 -123.91927
    88413577 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6471 -123.91927
    88414544 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.65177 -123.91726
    88414545 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.65177 -123.91726
    88414547 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.65177 -123.91726
    88415632 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6605 -123.9118093
    88415633 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.660465 -123.9118093
    88417488 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6631685 -123.904519
    88417489 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6624695-123.9072625
    88417490 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.66159 -123.90747
    88419690 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.674892 -123.8909007
    88419691 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.675017 -123.8900689
    88419692 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.674863 -123.8897006
    88420894 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.66827 -123.85067
    88421558 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.66423 -123.84913
    88421559 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.66423 -123.84913
    88421560 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.66423 -123.84913
    88422206 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.66106 -123.84942
    88422207 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.66106 -123.84942
    88422208 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.66106 -123.84942
    88422773 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.65121 -123.83172
    88422775 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.65121 -123.83172
    88422777 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.65121 -123.83172
    88422779 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.65121 -123.83172
    88422784 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.65121 -123.83172
    88487612 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.64798 -123.8219997
    88487613 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.64798 -123.8219997
    88487621 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.64798 -123.8219997
    88487626 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.64797 -123.8221048
    88488401 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.64373 -123.81301
    88488402 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.64373 -123.81301
    88490931 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.63969 -123.8013472
    88490936 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.63969 -123.8013472
    88490937 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.63969 -123.8013472
    88490938 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.63969 -123.8013472
    88490941 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.63937 -123.799139
    88490942 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.63698 -123.8016364
    88490943 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.63866 -123.7968973
    88491807 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.62763 -123.76401
    88551722 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.61745 -123.73053
    88551724 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.61745 -123.73053
    88551725 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.61745 -123.73053
    88551730 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.61745 -123.73053
    88552778 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.62075 -123.71294
    88552779 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.62075 -123.71294
    88552781 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.62075 -123.71294
    88552784 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.62075 -123.71294
    88553578 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.61874 -123.6836
    88553581 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.61874 -123.6836
    88553582 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.61874 -123.6836
    88553585 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.61874 -123.6836
    88553587 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.61874 -123.6836
    88554532 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6202 -123.6492
    88554533 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.6202 -123.6492
    88554534 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6202 -123.6492
    88554538 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.6202 -123.6492
    88681198 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.61614321 -123.6303367
    88681200 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.61478212 -123.6303738
    88681994 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.60427 -123.6223094
    88681995 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.60427 -123.6223094
    88681996 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.60427 -123.6223094
    88681997 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.60401 -123.6222084
    88682483 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.60229 -123.609793
    88682486 Pseudotsuga menziesii Heat damage 44.60229 -123.609793
    88683531 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59507 -123.58834
    88683532 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59507 -123.58834
    88683533 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59507 -123.58834
    88683535 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59507 -123.58834
    88683536 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59507 -123.58834
    88683537 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59507 -123.58834
    88683540 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59507 -123.58834
    88683543 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59507 -123.58834
    88683545 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59507 -123.58834
    88684345 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59970597 -123.5515906
    88684346 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59970597 -123.5515906
    88684347 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59970597 -123.5515906
    88684352 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59970597 -123.5515906
    88684353 Pseudotsuga menziesii 44.59970597 -123.5515906
    88415631 Thuja plicata Heat damage 44.65981846 -123.9115014
    88417493 Thuja plicata Heat damage 44.66159 -123.90747
    88419696 Thuja plicata Heat damage 44.67441246 -123.8906934
    88490933 Thuja plicata Heat damage 44.63969025 -123.8013472
    88490946 Thuja plicata Heat damage 44.63969025 -123.8013472
    88420887 Tsuga heterophylla Heat damage 44.66853046 -123.8478076
    88420888 Tsuga heterophylla Heat damage 44.66853046 -123.8478076
    88420890 Tsuga heterophylla Heat damage 44.66853046 -123.8478076
    88420891 Tsuga heterophylla Heat damage 44.66853046 -123.8478076
    88487614 Tsuga heterophylla Heat damage 44.64797541 -123.8219997
    88487616 Tsuga heterophylla Heat damage 44.64797541 -123.8219997
    88487618 Tsuga heterophylla Heat damage 44.64797541 -123.8219997
    88487619 Tsuga heterophylla Heat damage 44.64797541 -123.8219997

    Posted on July 26, 2021 21:46 by sedgequeen sedgequeen | 1 observation | 5 comments | Leave a comment
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    Подводим итоги

    Вот и завершилась полевая практика, а вместе с ней и наше соревнование. Борьба была упорной! Окончательные результаты будут подведены чуть позже, дадим время экспертам iNat на просмотр и верификацию всех сделанных наблюдений. А сейчас посмотрим, какая же картина зафиксирована на конец соревнования. Напомню, что в зачёт приняты только наблюдения с исследовательским статусом и точностью местоположения менее 50 м, а в описании проекта показаны все наблюдения и виды, включая и неверифицированные.

    Всего участниками было загружено наблюдений: 2771.

    Из них наблюдений с исследовательским статусом: 1962 (71%).

    Наблюдений с исследовательским статусом и точностью привязки более 50 м (зачёт): 1638 (60%).

    Всего участников с наблюдениями: 28.

    Участников с зачётными наблюдениями: 27.

    Зафиксировано видов в зачёте: 464.

    Ранги участников по числу видов

    Ранг Пользователь Наблюдений Видов
    1 @dmivanov 321 188
    2 @alexandra_emelyanova 269 177
    3 @borisova_tanya 146 111
    4 @konstantinova_elena 127 106
    5 @gabitovyan 158 95
    6 @milana_bagina 104 81
    7 @svetlanarogatykh 89 70
    8 @ksennaturalist 71 61
    9 @ruslansadykov 61 57
    10 @valieva_emiliya_02-901 49 43
    11 @shevchuk_kostya 39 36
    12 @emisitdikova 32 30
    13 @julia_pavlova1 28 26
    14 @guliya_sageeva 27 25
    15 @vladatelnovakpfu 22 22
    16 @adilya_galeeva 21 20
    17 @aminagusamova 17 17
    18 @vasyanova_varvara 14 14
    19 @farit_gazetdinov 12 11
    20 @orcinusorca29 10 10
    21 @a_tachukova 7 7
    22 @bulat_akhiyarov 7 6
    23 @naturalist49900 2 2
    24 @mutaevaalbina 2 2
    25 @sergey02_003 1 1
    26 @razilkhaf 1 1
    27 @pavel_andreev 1 1

    Ранги участников по числу наблюдений

    Ранг Пользователь Наблюдений Видов
    1 @dmivanov 321 188
    2 @alexandra_emelyanova 269 177
    3 @gabitovyan 158 95
    4 @borisova_tanya 146 111
    5 @konstantinova_elena 127 106
    6 @milana_bagina 104 81
    7 @svetlanarogatykh 89 70
    8 @ksennaturalist 71 61
    9 @ruslansadykov 61 57
    10 @valieva_emiliya_02-901 49 43
    11 @shevchuk_kostya 39 36
    12 @emisitdikova 32 30
    13 @julia_pavlova1 28 26
    14 @guliya_sageeva 27 25
    15 @vladatelnovakpfu 22 22
    16 @adilya_galeeva 21 20
    17 @aminagusamova 17 17
    18 @vasyanova_varvara 14 14
    19 @farit_gazetdinov 12 11
    20 @orcinusorca29 10 10
    21 @bulat_akhiyarov 7 6
    22 @a_tachukova 7 7
    23 @naturalist49900 2 2
    24 @mutaevaalbina 2 2
    25 @sergey02_003 1 1
    26 @razilkhaf 1 1
    27 @pavel_andreev 1 1
    Официальное подведение итогов Университетского соревнования и церемония награждения победителей состоится в сентябре. Большое спасибо всем участникам, до встречи!
    Posted on July 26, 2021 20:06 by vadim_prokhorov vadim_prokhorov | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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    Take a Look: Spurges vs Purslane

    While spurges and purslane are not in the same classification, it may be hard to tell them apart by a photo or when you see them out on the street. Here's this guide to distinguish spurges and purslane.

    GROUND COVER: Spurges tend to spread out among the ground, while purslane typically grows in clumps, for lack of a better word. However, sometimes it does come along the ground, and it never grows like a tree, so keep your eye out and use the rest of this guide.

    MANY COLORS: Spurges come in quite a few varieties, from dark green-pinkish to a light sprout green, while purslane comes in usually one shade of green with a touch of pink-red.

    FLESHY LEAVES: Purslane has fleshier, juicier leaves while spurges have flat leaves.

    Can you tell the difference between the spurge and purslane in these two observations below?

    Posted on July 26, 2021 17:00 by iamsharkgirl iamsharkgirl | 2 observations | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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    Wild Roses of Saskatchewan How to tell them apart.

    Links provided for photograph referencing the four SK wild rose species.

    Minnesota Wild Flower has great images of blooms, leaves, fruit. Fruit images especially good for identification after late July

    Glen Lee on Saskatchewan Wild Flower has images going into all the rose parts but not the fruit

    Woods Rose Rosa woodsii
    https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/shrub/woods-wild-rose
    Wood' Rose https://www.saskwildflower.ca/nat_Rosa-woodsii.html
    The only difference between Wood's Rose and Smooth Rose is the pair of prickles just below the wood's rose leaf nodes (infrastipular.) The stem shows broad flattened bases on every bristle. Mainly seen with 7 leaflets. 2-4 blooms at end of stem (can be more) Any shape fruit, mostly globular. Often mixed up with smooth rose.

    Prickly Rose Rosa aciclaris
    Saskatchewan Data conservation centre gives this as Rosa acicularis ssp. sayi
    https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/shrub/prickly-wild-rose
    https://www.saskwildflower.ca/nat_Rosa-acicularis.html
    The tallest of all the prairie roses. 1.2 - 2.5 m (4 - 8 feet) high. Many many prickles on the stem. 5-7 leaflets rarely more. Only one to three flowers at the end of the stem, and usually one deep pink flower only. Most often the rose hip is long, oval and slender not globular. Round globular fruit.

    Prairie Rose Rosa arkansas
    https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/shrub/prairie-rose
    https://www.saskwildflower.ca/nat_Rosa-arkansana.html
    Shortest of all prairie wild roses - low growing 15 to 46 cm high and may bloom after the other roses are finished. Whitish pink flowers. (6 to 18 inches) 9-11 shiny leaflets. 1-4 flowers on end of stem. Round globular fruit.

    Note besides the three roses above, the Saskatchewan Conservation Data Centre SCDC also lists
    Smooth Rose Rosa blanda
    SCDC ranks Smooth rose as S1 Critically Imperiled/ Extremely rare At very high risk of extinction or extirpation due to extreme rarity, very steep declines, high threat level, or other factors.
    https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/shrub/smooth-wild-rose
    Not listed on Sk Wildflowers so no link
    https://gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org/species/rosa/blanda/
    Branches thornless or almost thornless as in images above.
    Upper portions of bush and new growth has no bristles. Usually 7 leaflets. 1-4 blooms at end of stem. Round globular fruit. Often confused with Wood's Rose. The only difference between Wood's Rose and Smooth Rose is the pair of prickles just below the wood's rose leaf nodes (infrastipular.)

    Because there are two rose species very similar, one could say that Wood's Rose/Smooth Rose are the most common species on the prairies.

    Great to take pictures of the bristles, the numbers of leaflets on a leaf, if there are bristles below leaf nodes, and after the bush stops blooming an image of the fruit.

    Posted on July 26, 2021 16:58 by saskatoonafforestationareas saskatoonafforestationareas | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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    Welcome!

    Welcome to the place to post pictures of Nocturnal Insects for the Thursday Aug 19 Extension Master Gardener College Session.

    You are welcome to post any photos of moths or other insects active outdoors prior on or before August 19th. Please include an approximate location or County so we know where these insects are located!

    During the event, we will share a selection of the moths collected.

    -David

    Posted on July 26, 2021 16:13 by lowenst6 lowenst6 | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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    The Moth Ball Returns!

    A two-week vacation 'round California culminated at Club Deluxe in the Haight-Ashbury section of San Francisco July 14 where saxophonist Stephen Lugerner ended every set by remarking on the significance of simply being there, in a crowded club, playing live.

    What has that got to do with iNaturalist?

    It's been a tough year, for us too, most especially because our hopes and plans for the 'Center at Center Hill' had to be put on hold until people felt comfortable being inside again.

    I'm proud of the way that the Pine Barrens Alliance continued its work during the pandemic: we were very busy this past year, but our headquarters was empty on most days and we had to cancel several of our annual events, including the 2020 Moth Ball.

    There were indications that things were changing for the better earlier this year, so we decided to schedule the 2021 Moth Ball for July 23 (during International Moth Week) but, not sure how much we'd be allowed to do, we altered the format, essentially tailoring the event for adults, including scheduling the start for 8 pm.

    Two weeks before the Ball the "Jill S. Crafts" summer scholars took up residency in the Center, exploring the preserve and creating over a half-dozen citizen science projects based on the natural communities, habitat and species of the Massachusetts Coastal Pine Barrens.

    These middle and high school students roamed the preserve, exploring our bog, the tidepools along our coast, the woods and wildlands that we always hoped would become a living classroom for teaching about the unique qualities and intrinsic value of this globally rare ecoregion, and ended their 10-days here with presentations on poison ivy, edible plants, the remarkable pitch pine tree and other subjects - demonstrating both the individual students creativity and the potential of our facility and grounds.

    The 'scholars' last day was followed, that night, by the moth ball, where upwards of 75 people marveled at the dozens of moth species found (lured to 'traps' by special lighting) in the preserve and, by inference, within this special ecoregion while enjoying the traditional beverage of Lepidopterists worldwide, the root beer float.

    Jake McCumber, who manages the second largest tract of undisturbed pine barrens in the ecoregion at Joint Base Cape Cod, attended the Ball with his two young children and, using iNaturalist, recorded over 80 varieties of moths including one that, he believes, has never been seen in Plymouth County.

    The event went on until after 1 a.m.

    It was exciting to see so many people, actually there. It was exciting to see so many moths, lured by the lights. It was exciting to think that, with perseverance and a little luck, this was just the first of many more gatherings, walks, events and educational activities to come at the Center, at Center Hill.

    Posted on July 26, 2021 16:04 by centerhillfrank centerhillfrank | 0 comments | Leave a comment
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