Field Journal Post 3: Social Behavior and Phenology

This week I did my bird walk in the Cheslin Preserve in Embreeville, Pennsylvania. This is an extensive grassland area with a forested plot around the meadows. Today it was about 50 degrees and partly cloudy. The day before it had rained quite heavily all day and the ground was still quite wet.
I started walking through the meadows and saw numerous grassland birds including Horned Larks, Eastern Bluebirds, and Tree Swallows. I then went into a woodlot and saw many more generalist and forest species. Here, I was able to notice both species and behavioral changes. These changes were obviously linked to the forested area and sub-habitats found within the woodlot.
In terms of communication, I saw a fair amount of direct inter-species communication between the Eastern Bluebirds and Tree Swallows as they dove at each other in competition for the few bird boxes along the meadows. This was a much more obvious communication than others. They were calling and diving, making their communication between the species abundantly clear. These two birds have relatively similar coloration as well. Both are colored with structural pigments that produce two different shades of blue. These colors are also much brighter on the males of each species, indicating that there is some sort of mating aspect to their coloration. There may also be an evolutionary advantage for these aerial insectivores to have white bellies and blue backs and wings.
I chose to focus on one male Northern Cardinal. It was perched on a branch mid-way up a tree calling out and looking around quite alert. This mating or territory call most likely greatly influences the circadian rhythm of the Cardinal because it dictates how the bird spends much of his day. In terms of circannual rhythm, the mating season is a very significant part of the year that the bird spends much of his time and energy on when it is occurring.

Posted by lukebeeson lukebeeson, March 25, 2020 00:35

Observations

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

American Robin Turdus migratorius

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:28 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Red-winged Blackbird Agelaius phoeniceus

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:30 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Eastern Phoebe Sayornis phoebe

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:31 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Horned Lark Eremophila alpestris

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:36 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Tree Swallow Tachycineta bicolor

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:38 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Eastern Bluebird Sialia sialis

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:40 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Northern Cardinal Cardinalis cardinalis

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:41 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

White-breasted Nuthatch Sitta carolinensis

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:43 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

American Goldfinch Spinus tristis

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:44 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

What

Carolina Chickadee Poecile carolinensis

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:44 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Fox Sparrow Passerella iliaca

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:48 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

White-throated Sparrow Zonotrichia albicollis

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:49 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

Square

What

Red-bellied Woodpecker Melanerpes carolinus

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:50 PM ADT

Photos / Sounds

No photos or sounds

What

Black Vulture Coragyps atratus

Observer

lukebeeson

Date

March 24, 2020 06:52 PM ADT

Comments

No comments yet.

Add a Comment

Sign In or Sign Up to add comments

Is this inappropriate, spam, or offensive? Add a Flag