Journal archives for June 2019

June 20, 2019

Cormorant Chick Rescued After Fall From Nest.

Rescuers hope this black powder-puff will eventually be released in the wild.

https://patch.com/california/walnutcreek/amp/28143434/cormorant-chick-rescued-after-fall-nest

Posted on June 20, 2019 22:55 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 11, 2019

The Aggie City of Davis is home for over 150 species of birds, among other.

Davis students, community members can appreciate native wildlife, nature right outside their doors

Besides the students, professors and faculty who can be seen on campus, there are also fox squirrels, yellow-billed magpies, gopher snakes, burrowing owls and more that can also be spotted around UC Davis. Over 150 animals call this campus their home, just as any student might.

https://theaggie.org/2019/06/10/city-of-davis-is-home-for-over-150-species-of-birds-among-other-wildlife/

Posted on June 11, 2019 01:17 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 15, 2019

How People Saved the Seabirds of the California Current.

The San Francisco Bay Area is bordered on the west by the California Current, one of five upwelling-driven “boundary currents” on Earth where the vast majority of the world’s fishery harvests occur. These boundaries are the edges of major oceanic gyres, like the North Pacific Gyre in the case of the California Current. The incomparable productivity of these stretches of ocean are generated by strong, persistent winds that bring the upwelling of nutrient-rich water from the depths into the sunlight where phytoplankton, the base of the food web, can thrive.

https://baynature.org/2019/06/14/how-people-saved-the-seabirds-of-the-california-current/

Posted on June 15, 2019 00:04 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 06, 2019

Crows Are Crowding Your Bay Area Skies. Why?

Quick: What's the one bird you see and hear most every day, day in and day out, without fail?

We're willing to bet that for most of us in the Bay Area, there's one avian species that predominates in our daily bird experience: Corvus brachyrhynchos, better known to most of us as "the crow."

https://www.kqed.org/news/11752268/crows-are-crowding-your-bay-area-skies-why

Posted on June 06, 2019 22:20 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 17, 2019

Surf Scoter Decline, Interrupted.

The popular ducks showed up in the Bay in astonishing numbers in winter 2019, pausing a three-decade decline and puzzling scientists.

https://baynature.org/2019/06/17/surf-scoter-decline-interrupted/

Posted on June 17, 2019 18:15 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 29, 2019

This 4th Of July, Think Of Your Feathered Friends As You Plan For Fireworks.

Why does it matter now? The answer is fireworks. Specifically, the noises that accompany fireworks and pose a threat to birds, according to Ray Brown, host of the Talkin' Birds podcast.

https://www.npr.org/2019/06/29/737001802/this-4th-of-july-think-of-your-feathered-friends-as-you-plan-for-fireworks

Posted on June 29, 2019 19:25 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 26, 2019

Golden Eagle Chicks Found in Santa Monica Mountains for 1st Time in 30 Years.

For the first time since the late 1980s, a pair of golden eagle chicks have been spotted in a nest in the Santa Monica Mountains, officials announced Wednesday.

https://ktla.com/2019/06/26/golden-eagle-chicks-found-in-santa-monica-mountains-for-1st-time-in-30-years/amp/

Posted on June 26, 2019 18:43 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment

June 27, 2019

California scientists consider case of poisoned songbirds.

Researchers with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife have closed the case of the poisoned songbirds. Their conclusion: the birds died after eating elm tree seeds exposed to a pesticide synthetically derived from nicotine.

https://www.upi.com/amp/Science_News/2019/06/27/California-scientists-consider-case-of-poisoned-songbirds/8371561578247/

Posted on June 27, 2019 23:26 by biohexx1 biohexx1 | 0 comments | Leave a comment